Sleeping pads

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PJ88
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Sleeping pads

Post by PJ88 »

I'm thinking of getting a closed cell sleeping pad for when my inflatable pad eventually starts leaking. I am considering the Nemo Switchback but cannot find any solid feedback on how it would fare in Colorado. A 2 R rating seems a bit low. Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks!
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justiner
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Re: Sleeping pads

Post by justiner »

I use one - it's a closed cell foam sleeping pad - they're not very exciting, but pretty cheap. I've used it this winter alone, as well as with a cut down Xtherm. I've also used it cut down to just 4 panels to use as a padding for my backpack when not pressed into sleeping duties. As long as you're comfortable sleeping on it (not great for side sleepers) should work fine for CO. I never got chilled from below, tho I run fairly warm.
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PJ88
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Re: Sleeping pads

Post by PJ88 »

Yeah that’s a problem- I’m a side sleeper. I usually start on my side and then switch to my back as I drift off. Problem is when I lay on my back I tend to close my mouth and I don’t get enough oxygen through my nose above 9k and wake up. I run warm except for my feet, but there are ways to supplement warmth in the bag for that.
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justiner
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Re: Sleeping pads

Post by justiner »

You could try a SnoreRX which is for snoring/sleep apnea - it'll keep a passageway open in your mouth. Get used to it by using beforehand, or you'll be slobbering too much.

Down booties are great to keep feet warm.
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nyker
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Re: Sleeping pads

Post by nyker »

I've used a couple versions of the classic Thermarest closed cell pad. They were ok. The main thing I liked was no need to set up and the consistency vs. the need to blow up the inflatable and then realize it wasn't inflated enough where I needed padding under my hips and shoulders (side sleeper), it was often lacking while the closed cell pad was consistent. Two pads work better than one, especially in cold weather but obv then you need to carry two. Main downside of the closed cells I've used is bulk and need to usually strap to the outside my pack vs just rolling it up like the inflatable and jam into the pack.
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