Avalanche Instructors and Facilities

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curt86iroc
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Re: Avalanche Instructors and Facilities

Post by curt86iroc »

Skimo95 wrote: Tue Nov 28, 2023 10:03 am What type of homework are you doing outside of classes?
IMO, the largest portion of continued avi education that people consistently miss is partner rescue skills, and specifically refreshing them. skills should be refreshed and tested annually, if for nothing else than dusting off the cobwebs.

how many people can honestly say they go out and practice transceiver searching, probing and shoveling outside of a formal class? get a few friends together and spend a day burying transceivers, searching, probing and strategic shoveling. it's time well spent, and it's free.
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Re: Avalanche Instructors and Facilities

Post by daway8 »

curt86iroc wrote: Wed Nov 29, 2023 11:36 am
Skimo95 wrote: Tue Nov 28, 2023 10:03 am What type of homework are you doing outside of classes?
IMO, the largest portion of continued avi education that people consistently miss is partner rescue skills, and specifically refreshing them. skills should be refreshed and tested annually, if for nothing else than dusting off the cobwebs.

how many people can honestly say they go out and practice transceiver searching, probing and shoveling outside of a formal class? get a few friends together and spend a day burying transceivers, searching, probing and strategic shoveling. it's time well spent, and it's free.
Or easier still, go to the avalanche beacon training park in Hidden Valley in Rocky Mountain National Park - no need to do the burying yourself and don't need to schedule with anyone else - just go there on your own, flip the switch(s) and go find it. Control panel even registers a successful probe strike.

You can easily practice single or multiple burials. I try to do that at least once a year, usually on a bad weather weekend where the high peaks are too stormy for me to want to attempt.

Only thing missing is that your not supposed to actually dig them up, so you miss that part of the practice - but digging in avy compacted snow would be a totally different experience anyways...

https://www.nps.gov/romo/learn/news/pr_ ... l_park.htm

I'll sit back and smile as people cringe at the use of "beacon" instead of transceiver - I'm just copying/pasting what they put.
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Re: Avalanche Instructors and Facilities

Post by Skimo95 »

Thank you very much Angry, Chicago Transplant, and SnowAlien for your contributions. I highly value your opinions.
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Re: Avalanche Instructors and Facilities

Post by rmcpherson »

Does anyone have pointers for how to sign up for the Colorado Mountain College courses as a non-student? I was looking at their course catalog but it's not obvious to me how to enroll in a class with them. https://selfservice.coloradomtn.edu/Stu ... =avalanche
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Re: Avalanche Instructors and Facilities

Post by Jorts »

rmcpherson wrote: Fri Dec 01, 2023 10:48 am Does anyone have pointers for how to sign up for the Colorado Mountain College courses as a non-student? I was looking at their course catalog but it's not obvious to me how to enroll in a class with them. https://selfservice.coloradomtn.edu/Stu ... =avalanche
I think you might have to become a student to enroll. Not certain, it's been a long time.
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Re: Avalanche Instructors and Facilities

Post by uwe »

Lots of good Colorado providers for AIARE courses; which is a great first step into avalanche education. I read in this thread someone took AIARE through the Pikes Peak Alpine School. Me, too. Took it and a 5 day mountaineering course with them. At that time, the owner was Jamie. Cool dude and great teacher. He's how I got into post Appalachian 'mountaineering'...eventually all the way to Denali. CMC is good, as is Silverton's SAS, and of course the juggernaut of Colorado avalanche education, CMS. I've been instructing AIARE for the Colorado Mountain Club for a while. I saw someone else mention Karin. She'll be stoked to get the compliment. I'm thinking all of the providers do a pretty good job of educating students in using a risk management framework particular to travel in avalanche terrain. AIARE does not give out Course Provider status to anyone. I'm stoked no matter where you go to get the education. That is one more person in the winter BC making better decisions and who can help in a rescue situation.
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Re: Avalanche Instructors and Facilities

Post by gb »

uwe wrote: Wed Dec 06, 2023 7:45 pm Lots of good Colorado providers for AIARE courses; which is a great first step into avalanche education. I read in this thread someone took AIARE through the Pikes Peak Alpine School. Me, too. Took it and a 5 day mountaineering course with them. At that time, the owner was Jamie. Cool dude and great teacher. He's how I got into post Appalachian 'mountaineering'...eventually all the way to Denali. CMC is good, as is Silverton's SAS, and of course the juggernaut of Colorado avalanche education, CMS. I've been instructing AIARE for the Colorado Mountain Club for a while. I saw someone else mention Karin. She'll be stoked to get the compliment. I'm thinking all of the providers do a pretty good job of educating students in using a risk management framework particular to travel in avalanche terrain. AIARE does not give out Course Provider status to anyone. I'm stoked no matter where you go to get the education. That is one more person in the winter BC making better decisions and who can help in a rescue situation.
I don't think AIARE is necessary for a good course (I'm not sure if you were trying to imply that or not, I don't think you were). But for those reading and don't know this, not all courses are AIARE- CMS dropped AIARE to go with AAI this season, and Silverton isn't AIARE either. Ultimately the courses are very similar.

Bottom line, if you like a course offered through Silverton, CMS, or an AIARE provider, it will be great and worth doing.
curt86iroc
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Re: Avalanche Instructors and Facilities

Post by curt86iroc »

gb wrote: Thu Dec 07, 2023 8:27 am
uwe wrote: Wed Dec 06, 2023 7:45 pm Lots of good Colorado providers for AIARE courses; which is a great first step into avalanche education. I read in this thread someone took AIARE through the Pikes Peak Alpine School. Me, too. Took it and a 5 day mountaineering course with them. At that time, the owner was Jamie. Cool dude and great teacher. He's how I got into post Appalachian 'mountaineering'...eventually all the way to Denali. CMC is good, as is Silverton's SAS, and of course the juggernaut of Colorado avalanche education, CMS. I've been instructing AIARE for the Colorado Mountain Club for a while. I saw someone else mention Karin. She'll be stoked to get the compliment. I'm thinking all of the providers do a pretty good job of educating students in using a risk management framework particular to travel in avalanche terrain. AIARE does not give out Course Provider status to anyone. I'm stoked no matter where you go to get the education. That is one more person in the winter BC making better decisions and who can help in a rescue situation.
I don't think AIARE is necessary for a good course (I'm not sure if you were trying to imply that or not, I don't think you were). But for those reading and don't know this, not all courses are AIARE- CMS dropped AIARE to go with AAI this season, and Silverton isn't AIARE either. Ultimately the courses are very similar.

Bottom line, if you like a course offered through Silverton, CMS, or an AIARE provider, it will be great and worth doing.
correct me if im wrong, but i believe AIARE and AAI both teach the same curriculum defined by AAA. at the end of the day, AAI and AIARE are course providers and AAA sets the curriculums for the various training levels
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Re: Avalanche Instructors and Facilities

Post by gb »

curt86iroc wrote: Thu Dec 07, 2023 9:14 am

correct me if im wrong, but i believe AIARE and AAI both teach the same curriculum defined by AAA. at the end of the day, AAI and AIARE are course providers and AAA sets the curriculums for the various training levels
Correct. I almost mentioned that (SAS is under AAA too), but I felt like I was already getting in the weeds. I think there is a popular misconception that courses have to be AIARE, but they don't. That's the only point I was trying to make.
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