Question for those familiar with the Wasatch range.

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Jbrow327
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Question for those familiar with the Wasatch range.

Post by Jbrow327 » Sun Apr 18, 2021 3:01 pm

I have lived in the Salt Lake area all 29 years of my life. I have never climbed any of the major peaks except for mount Olympus. This year I'd like to go from beginner to bagging most if not all wasatch eleveners, 1 or 2 Uintah 13ers, and maybe a handful of 14ers in Colorado. Starting late may or mid June at the latest. I'm probably 80 or so pounds overweight but I know I'll get up the mountain. It'll just take me a lot longer lol.

My question is, what are the best beginner peaks starting in June? What are the best beginner eleveners?

Thanks.
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Re: Question for those familiar with the Wasatch range.

Post by Salient » Sun Apr 18, 2021 3:28 pm

I find it funny that the Wasatch range is an anagram of the Sawatch range
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Re: Question for those familiar with the Wasatch range.

Post by seano » Sun Apr 18, 2021 3:40 pm

Timpanogos is "easy" in that it has a trail and is popular; Lone Peak also has a trail. The peaks at the head of Little Cottonwood (Sugarloaf, Baldy, AF Twin) are also pretty easy, since they are surrounded by ski areas and have a high trailhead. They still all had a fair bit of snow when I did them in late April and early May. I suspect you'll find some lingering snow in late May, too.
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Re: Question for those familiar with the Wasatch range.

Post by Geckser » Sun Apr 18, 2021 3:52 pm

For beginner peaks, on the tier of Mount Olympus or slightly easier, I have a few summits I really love.
Firstly, very much on the easier side is Lookout Peak. It's is a very nice spring climb with a decent bit of elevation gain and 7-12 miles of distance depending on which direction you hit it from. It sits above Emmigration and is totally nontechnical but gives good training for tougher peaks. Also very beautiful and not super crowded.

Lookout has a bigger brother of Grandview peak which is a bigger time investment but even more beautiful and even less crowded. It can be done from little mountain as well making for big day, about 23 miles and 4 thousand feet of gain. Really not many people at all in this part of the Wasatch and the best bet for a hiker looking for a relaxing summer (very easy) ridge walk.

Goblers knob/ Mount Raymond are some other nice very achievable hikes, crowded on weekdays but nontechnical with a decent amount of elevation gain from both Millcreek and Big Cottonwood. Some more peaks that are good for getting some pretty, nontechnical elevation in.

Mount Grandeur is a spectacular training mountain, especially on the west face if you are wanting to get in shape, it has 3,238 feet of gain in 2.2 miles. The hike is grim in the dead of summer as the sun will be beating on your back for the entire trip but if you leave early/late enough in the day it makes for a wonderful workout.

Timp is of course a good medium difficulty mountain, stunningly beautiful and crazy crowded but it is certainly a good introduction to the high peaks in the American fork region of the Wasatch. Definitely a must do for someone on the Wasatch front.

This one isn't a peak but I love going to the upper bells canyon reservoir. Though with 6 miles up and 4,300 feet of gain on somewhat rough terrain it kind of feels like it. Once again very beautiful and you won't see too many people after you get past the falls.
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Re: Question for those familiar with the Wasatch range.

Post by greenonion » Sun Apr 18, 2021 4:01 pm

Geckser wrote:
Sun Apr 18, 2021 3:52 pm
For beginner peaks, on the tier of Mount Olympus or slightly easier, I have a few summits I really love.
Firstly, very much on the easier side is Lookout Peak. It's is a very nice spring climb with a decent bit of elevation gain and 7-12 miles of distance depending on which direction you hit it from. It sits above Emmigration and is totally nontechnical but gives good training for tougher peaks. Also very beautiful and not super crowded.

Lookout has a bigger brother of Grandview peak which is a bigger time investment but even more beautiful and even less crowded. It can be done from little mountain as well making for big day, about 23 miles and 4 thousand feet of gain. Really not many people at all in this part of the Wasatch and the best bet for a hiker looking for a relaxing summer (very easy) ridge walk.

Goblers knob/ Mount Raymond are some other nice very achievable hikes, crowded on weekdays but nontechnical with a decent amount of elevation gain from both Millcreek and Big Cottonwood. Some more peaks that are good for getting some pretty, nontechnical elevation in.

Mount Grandeur is a spectacular training mountain, especially on the west face if you are wanting to get in shape, it has 3,238 feet of gain in 2.2 miles. The hike is grim in the dead of summer as the sun will be beating on your back for the entire trip but if you leave early/late enough in the day it makes for a wonderful workout.

Timp is of course a good medium difficulty mountain, stunningly beautiful and crazy crowded but it is certainly a good introduction to the high peaks in the American fork region of the Wasatch. Definitely a must do for someone on the Wasatch front.

This one isn't a peak but I love going to the upper bells canyon reservoir. Though with 6 miles up and 4,300 feet of gain on somewhat rough terrain it kind of feels like it. Once again very beautiful and you won't see too many people after you get past the falls.
+1 on every single point, but with no experience with Lookout. Am quite familiar with all other examples. Add Sunset peak. Access from Brighton and Lake Catherine or from Albion basin up to Catherine Pass.
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Re: Question for those familiar with the Wasatch range.

Post by Jbrow327 » Sun Apr 18, 2021 4:52 pm

Geckser wrote:
Sun Apr 18, 2021 3:52 pm
For beginner peaks, on the tier of Mount Olympus or slightly easier, I have a few summits I really love.
Firstly, very much on the easier side is Lookout Peak. It's is a very nice spring climb with a decent bit of elevation gain and 7-12 miles of distance depending on which direction you hit it from. It sits above Emmigration and is totally nontechnical but gives good training for tougher peaks. Also very beautiful and not super crowded.

Lookout has a bigger brother of Grandview peak which is a bigger time investment but even more beautiful and even less crowded. It can be done from little mountain as well making for big day, about 23 miles and 4 thousand feet of gain. Really not many people at all in this part of the Wasatch and the best bet for a hiker looking for a relaxing summer (very easy) ridge walk.

Goblers knob/ Mount Raymond are some other nice very achievable hikes, crowded on weekdays but nontechnical with a decent amount of elevation gain from both Millcreek and Big Cottonwood. Some more peaks that are good for getting some pretty, nontechnical elevation in.

Mount Grandeur is a spectacular training mountain, especially on the west face if you are wanting to get in shape, it has 3,238 feet of gain in 2.2 miles. The hike is grim in the dead of summer as the sun will be beating on your back for the entire trip but if you leave early/late enough in the day it makes for a wonderful workout.

Timp is of course a good medium difficulty mountain, stunningly beautiful and crazy crowded but it is certainly a good introduction to the high peaks in the American fork region of the Wasatch. Definitely a must do for someone on the Wasatch front.

This one isn't a peak but I love going to the upper bells canyon reservoir. Though with 6 miles up and 4,300 feet of gain on somewhat rough terrain it kind of feels like it. Once again very beautiful and you won't see too many people after you get past the falls.
Thank you very much. The other goal i was considering was climbing the 8 ultra prominent peaks in Utah. Seems like high peaks are scattered all over the state.
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Re: Question for those familiar with the Wasatch range.

Post by Geckser » Sun Apr 18, 2021 6:06 pm

If you get a chance you should do Lookout Peak greenonion. The best trailhead is at Affleck park off of east canyon road 3.5 miles above dell reservoir. Definitely one of my favorite day hikes. Tends to be very relaxing and it provides very nice views year round.
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Re: Question for those familiar with the Wasatch range.

Post by Scott P » Sun Apr 18, 2021 6:21 pm

Jbrow327 wrote:
Sun Apr 18, 2021 3:01 pm
My question is, what are the best beginner peaks starting in June? What are the best beginner eleveners?
You have already asked this multiple times and it has already been answered multiple times.
I'm slow and fat. Unfortunately, those are my good qualities.
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Re: Question for those familiar with the Wasatch range.

Post by greenonion » Sun Apr 18, 2021 10:48 pm

Geckser wrote:
Sun Apr 18, 2021 6:06 pm
If you get a chance you should do Lookout Peak greenonion. The best trailhead is at Affleck park off of east canyon road 3.5 miles above dell reservoir. Definitely one of my favorite day hikes. Tends to be very relaxing and it provides very nice views year round.
Thanks! I know that area pretty well. Always good to hear about new trails!
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