Learning to outdoors rock climb

Need a climbing partner? Trying to form a hiking group for an outing?
Forum rules
Please do not use this forum to advertise, sell photos or other products or promote a commercial website. For more details, please see the Terms of Use you agreed to when joining the forum.
User avatar
+Gravy
Posts: 29
Joined: 1/30/2021
14ers: List not added
13ers: 1

Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by +Gravy »

Anyone interested in doing a gym to crag class for transitioning from indoor to outdoor sport climbing?

..
Last edited by +Gravy on Sun Apr 11, 2021 11:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Jorts
Posts: 569
Joined: 4/12/2013
14ers: 51 3 1
13ers: 66 12 5
Trip Reports (8)

Re: Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by Jorts »

Can take you out in Tenmile Canyon on a weekday for half a day.

What are your concerns about the transition?
Traveling light is the only way to fly.
IG: @summityinzer
Strava: Brent Herring
User avatar
+Gravy
Posts: 29
Joined: 1/30/2021
14ers: List not added
13ers: 1

Re: Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by +Gravy »

...tmi
Last edited by +Gravy on Sun Apr 11, 2021 11:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Conor
Posts: 1033
Joined: 9/2/2014
14ers: 41 6 6
13ers: 50 1 1
Trip Reports (7)

Re: Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by Conor »

I think the crux is learning to belay someone while on lead. If you can put that out there, lots of people are always looking for a catch. After that, learning to lead climb is easy. As far as "outdoor", anchor building is helpful, but a lot of places you just need a quad and some locking biners if setting up a top rope. I can't do anything until june, but maybe some more spcificity in what you are looking to learn outdoors outside of sport....

I would also add, paying for the private guide will be money well spent over the class. It can be tailored to exactly what you need....

Also, check mountain proj, someone might take you up, as is, on meat anchor duties.
TomPierce
Posts: 2535
Joined: 11/21/2007
14ers: List not added
Trip Reports (2)

Re: Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by TomPierce »

Having climbed for several years and thinking through the beginning learning-to-climb process, a few thoughts for +Gravy:

-First, welcome! Welcome to the super cool, great world of techinical climbing (aka "trad climbing")! Some people really like it, it could become a multi-decade passion. It will change you as a climber, and as a person. Again, welcome & good luck in learning a new set of skills.

-Here's something to ponder: Like any new skill/sport, learning maybe 50% comes pretty quickly and easily. But mastering that last 50% can take years. So maybe slow down on the expectations, I wouldn't expect to safely learn outdoor lead climbing in two lessons. Technical/traditional outdoor climbing is not something to whip through quickly. Unfortunately, if you go too fast and make a significant mistake when on lead, climbers can get really messed up or die. This isn't hiking. Taking an airborne fall and hitting rocks always ends badly. Better to learn well than learn quickly. OK, enough with the obvious lectures...

-That said, you can start learning now! There's lots of pretty good stuff in books (e.g. Freedom of the Hills has good intro stuff) and lots of pretty good videos on youtube. Maybe read some intro stuff, go over some intro videos, learn a few basic knots (buy a section of non-climbing rope at Home Depot to practice). Then take a few lessons with a guide. That way you'll already have a bit of a foundation, it will make your lessons more meaningful. On the guide sessions, personally I think a very small group for lessons might be best, you can learn by watching others, etc.

Good luck!

-Tom
User avatar
I Man
Posts: 998
Joined: 7/18/2011
14ers: 58 49
13ers: 73 12
Trip Reports (30)
Contact:

Re: Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by I Man »

CaptCO wrote: Sun Apr 04, 2021 10:08 pm It's not hard, finding someone to teach you multiple times is the toughest bet. Most of the rock climbers around here are very egotistic just a friendly heads up
I would disagree with this statement. I was very lucky to learn from a dozen or so members of this forum who taught me all I needed to know about trad climbing (and all forms of climbing really). The only class I ever took was AVY-1 which I think was a smart move. Some people like to hire a guide to supplement, others don't. It is really up to you.
You can touch the void, just don't fall into it.

I fly a starship across the universe divide....and when I reach the other side...I'll find a place to rest my spirit if I can. Perhaps I may become a Mountain Man again.
User avatar
SchralpTheGnar
Posts: 1716
Joined: 2/26/2008
14ers: 51 49 1
13ers: 28 21
Trip Reports (20)

Re: Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by SchralpTheGnar »

You should take a class or read some books watch multiple videos to equip yourself with some knowledge to critique as opposed to blind faith in learning from one or two people that you meet online.

Outdoor sport climbing with bolted anchors isn’t too complicated but you can mess up here, especially around the anchors, trad climbing is next level up and requires more skill and patience.
User avatar
Alpinefroggy
Posts: 111
Joined: 5/11/2020
14ers: 28 2
13ers: 3
Trip Reports (3)

Re: Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by Alpinefroggy »

I think you should hold up and take your time here.

I would start in a climbing gym and there are millions of options to choose from all over the front range. Pretty much all of them have TR belay classes. You need to build some level of competence with tr belaying and endurance and technique before you jump into more crap.

Then you can learn to lead belay on sport and build toprope and sport anchors. Once you're climbing well and lead belaying well the world can be your oyster to learn gear placement knowledge on the ground. It takes a lot of time and even though I am about 5-6 months in, I haven't started leading yet and will only want to start lead belaying soon. Don't rush this, the mountains are always there.

I am eager as well since there are lots of things that have alpine climbing I want to get to.
User avatar
angry
Posts: 592
Joined: 10/5/2017
14ers: 58 37
13ers: 167 13

Re: Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by angry »

I've never had a climbing gym membership. I learned to climb solely outside with friends. If you can find some willing to go out with you, do it. The college I work at has an outdoor climbing program that will teach you the basics and all coursework is outside (garden, 11 mile, castlewood canyon). Lots of the community colleges in the state run similar programs at $153 per credit hour. Not sure where you're located, but it's worthing checking into.
User avatar
OldTrad
Posts: 257
Joined: 2/12/2017
14ers: 36
13ers: 9
Trip Reports (4)

Re: Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by OldTrad »

I Man wrote: Mon Apr 05, 2021 8:41 am
CaptCO wrote: Sun Apr 04, 2021 10:08 pm It's not hard, finding someone to teach you multiple times is the toughest bet. Most of the rock climbers around here are very egotistic just a friendly heads up
I would disagree with this statement. I was very lucky to learn from a dozen or so members of this forum who taught me all I needed to know about trad climbing (and all forms of climbing really). The only class I ever took was AVY-1 which I think was a smart move. Some people like to hire a guide to supplement, others don't. It is really up to you.
+1
I’ve spent many days out with several different members of this forum who I was happy to share my experience with. They are all folks who I have fun hiking with and their rock climbing skill level ranges anywhere from complete beginner to intermediate. Personally, I’m happy to mentor anyone, as long as they are someone I actually want to be around. Based on his tiresome exchanges here, I suspect that the trouble Capt has (in finding rock climbing mentors here, among other things) is more his own, rather than due to the egos of others.
User avatar
daway8
Posts: 748
Joined: 8/25/2017
14ers: 58 18
13ers: 102 21
Trip Reports (55)

Re: Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by daway8 »

@ +Gravy
One thing you might consider is going over to the Flatirons (SW edge of Boulder) and climbing around on some of the class 4 features such as I described in this Flatirons Intro trip report https://www.14ers.com/php14ers/triprepo ... m=tripmine. That can help you overcome unease with climbing outdoors and open the door for harder climbs.

I wrote that report specifically for people who are still fairly new to climbing (myself included). If you've already done 5.9/5.10 in the gym then you should be able to handle everything in that report (I've still not made it beyond 5.10 on auto-belay in the gym) although it's possible my risk tolerance may be different than yours - you can always back down and try some easier stuff if that turns out to be the case.

Alternately, if those are real easy for you I posted another TR focusing on Der Zerkle here: https://www.14ers.com/php14ers/triprepo ... m=tripmine and it's likely I'll follow up with some more later this year as I get the chance to get down there more (too many competing goals at the moment...)

I'm slowly dipping my toes into rappelling - got some one-on-one instruction in the gym last month and hope to try some at the Flatirons at some point this year, though I'm still working on picking out the best rope and other gear and will probably need a refresher on technique by the time I'm ready to try it "in the wild." But playing on the easy features at the Flatirons has been a huge help in slowly expanding my outdoors climbing confidence.
DaveLanders
Posts: 439
Joined: 3/7/2009
14ers: List not added

Re: Learning to outdoors rock climb

Post by DaveLanders »

There are some additional things you can work on in the climbing gym to get ready to climb outside.

First, you can learn to lead belay in the gym. That should translate directly to outdoor climbing.

Second, if you're toproping 9's and 10's in the gym, you're probably a good enough climber to work on leading in the gym. Clipping preplaced draws in the gym is certainly easier than leading sport routes outside, but it's a good start. Just remember that climbing grades in gyms are usually inflated compared to ratings on real rock.
Post Reply