Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Items that do not fit the categories above.
Forum rules
This forum is for general, mountaineering-related topics. For more details, please see the Terms of Use you agreed to when joining the forum.
User avatar
LTbear
Posts: 147
Joined: 9/24/2009
14er Checklist (24)

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby LTbear » Mon Oct 08, 2012 8:13 pm

Point North wrote:Like it or not, we're ruled by our biology and its software programs, primarily the reproductive program. Meet a girl and your "true self" quickly becomes the man in the suit.

Look deeper, and you may find that "you" are not in control at all. Your genes are. Most of a person's life is dedicated to ensuring that their genes are immortal -- getting passed along forever in successive generations of individuals. "You" are just along for the ride.

So perhaps the "you" behind the scenes really would like to spend a lifetime bummin around doing what you really want, but your genes and their software will have none of it.


Meh. Don't get too defeatist about it all. Your genes don't determine THAT much about your thought processes, I can assure you. Your mind, as you cultivate it, has immense power. (And I'm a genetecist).
Last edited by LTbear on Mon Oct 08, 2012 9:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
LTbear
Posts: 147
Joined: 9/24/2009
14er Checklist (24)

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby LTbear » Mon Oct 08, 2012 8:15 pm

Life's largely about balance. To me, time in the mountains is much more important than many other things in life. I also love science, so I set out early on to get just the life I want.

I'm a college faculty member (biology). I make great money, enjoy my job day to day, and get 3-day weekends almost every week, plus a week at Thanksgiving, a week at spring break, a month at Christmas, and three months in summer to play in the mountains as much as I want.
User avatar
ajkagy
Posts: 2664
Joined: 1/7/2007
14er Checklist Not Entered
Contact:

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby ajkagy » Mon Oct 08, 2012 8:49 pm

Point North wrote:So perhaps the "you" behind the scenes really would like to spend a lifetime bummin around doing what you really want, but your genes and their software will have none of it.


people love routine and safety. For most people, sacrificing that to be apart of the landscape instead of a commuter to the landscape is too much. I know a few people that lived out of their cars for an extended period of time and it was one of the greatest times of their lives...dirt bagging doesn't have to be scary :)
User avatar
coloradokevin
Posts: 1554
Joined: 6/13/2007
14er Checklist (15)

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby coloradokevin » Mon Oct 08, 2012 9:07 pm

This timeless debate never gets old. I have friends that have attacked the life thing from all angles, and for many different reasons.

It seems like most people fall (generally) into one of three distinct categories:

1) Live to work: make yourself the most successful person in your field that you can be (often in a lucrative field for these folks), pursue promotion and money at the expense of everything else, and buy a gigantic mansion you never actually see.

2) Live to play: abandon any idea of being a successful employee, pursue your hobbies at the expense of having a house, possessions, a wife/husband, or any stability. Live for the moment, and don't worry about retirement, savings, or a backup plan.

3) Balance your life: find a way to enjoy many of the thing that you want in life, but recognize that you need to go to work and earn money if you want to be able to enjoy a full and balanced life. Have a home, but not a mansion, perhaps get married, live somewhere you like, do the things you like in your spare time. Don't dedicate yourself to your work to the point that you give up what you love, and don't dedicate yourself to your hobbies to the point that you lose your livelihood.

I try to live with a sense of balance. Life doesn't always feel perfectly balanced, but I do think I often get to enjoy the best of both worlds. It's certainly true that I have to give up on some mountaineering/adventuring goals for the sake of job stability, but it is also true that I know where I'm going to sleep at night, I know that I can keep my cars running, keep food on the table, and won't be destitute if I ever have to miss a paycheck. I also have a viable plan for retirement, so I don't have to worry about working until I'm 70 years old (I'm on a plan to be out of the work world comfortably by age 55). Sometimes achieving balance means having a bit of foresight. There have been periods in my professional career where I've had more time available, and there have been times when I've had to buckle down at work to ensure that I'd be in a better place at a later point in my career. I won't ever get rich doing what I do, but I have enough money to support my lifestyle, and I have 8 weeks of vacation per year, and three days off per week... things could be so much worse.
User avatar
cheeseburglar
Posts: 2734
Joined: 8/7/2006
14er Checklist (58)
14ers in Winter (2)
13er Checklist (73)

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby cheeseburglar » Mon Oct 08, 2012 10:54 pm

I always like to be scheming or training for something outdoors.
I have some fun at work, but it isn't always fun.
When it isn't I think of a photo I saw in Nat Geo many years ago, of a man crawling out of a sewer covered in s**t. His job was to crawl in and clean the sewer. He had no chance of a better career.
Years ago I had the photo taped to my computer at work.
It could be worse. Do work, get money, do stuff.
That is life. Mine is good. If yours doesn't seem good, think of crawling through a sewer to earn money.
The marmot said “Nobody is perfect and you are not nobody.”

Random FoTH Quotes
User avatar
TravelingMatt
Posts: 1914
Joined: 6/29/2005
14er Checklist (56)
13er Checklist (355)

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby TravelingMatt » Tue Oct 09, 2012 2:06 pm

It would be nice to get back in touch with the corporate me.

I moved here because I wanted to do nothing but climb mountains, and there's really no better place in the world to do it while still living a first-world lifestyle. I accomplished what I set out to do, though. I could spend another summer in the San Juans, but really how many Sawatch 13ers do you need to go up. I still have goals that no amount of mountain climbing will fulfill, and that have proven much harder to accomplish than summiting any 14er. Oh well, I knew the risks.
AC 0000000
User avatar
BillMiddlebrook
Site Administrator
Posts: 7587
Joined: 7/25/2004
14er Checklist (58)
14ers Skied (46)
14ers in Winter (21)
Contact:

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby BillMiddlebrook » Tue Oct 09, 2012 2:41 pm

This discussion hits home with me and I ponder it quite often. I spent years balls-to-the-wall in the corporate world and it enabled me to retire very early. I left that world exhausted, angry and never, ever want to return to it. I sometimes wonder how I spent even a dozen years battling my way through it.

Since childhood, I've always been into the outdoors and once I retired, I applied most of my time into hiking, fishing and hunting and have never looked back. I'm pretty sure I'd paint the walls with my own blood if I had to go back to a desk job in the corporate world. No friggin' way. Don't get me wrong, I don't take my past for granted and I'm thankful for what I obtained from working so hard.

I think my point is this... You only live once. Take life by the horns to get what you want but, remember, what you want may change over time. :wink:
User avatar
susanjoypaul
Posts: 1990
Joined: 9/8/2006
14er Checklist (58)
14ers in Winter (2)
13er Checklist (87)

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby susanjoypaul » Wed Oct 10, 2012 6:11 am

BillMiddlebrook wrote:This discussion hits home with me and I ponder it quite often. I spent years balls-to-the-wall in the corporate world and it enabled me to retire very early. I left that world exhausted, angry and never, ever want to return to it. I sometimes wonder how I spent even a dozen years battling my way through it.

Since childhood, I've always been into the outdoors and once I retired, I applied most of my time into hiking, fishing and hunting and have never looked back. I'm pretty sure I'd paint the walls with my own blood if I had to go back to a desk job in the corporate world. No friggin' way. Don't get me wrong, I don't take my past for granted and I'm thankful for what I obtained from working so hard.

I think my point is this... You only live once. Take life by the horns to get what you want but, remember, what you want may change over time. :wink:

Loved your response here... we are all so willing to settle for mediocre lives, and by the time we realize what we settled for versus what could have been, we're too old and it's too late to do anything about it. We give up the opportunities for something better with each day at the office and every night in front of the TV, with each cup of coffee that motivates us to drag ourselves to work and every beer that knocks us out so we don't have to think about what could have been. "It's not so bad... it could be a lot worse," we tell ourselves - well, sure, but it could be a lot better, too! I for one don't even want to think about the thousands of hours I've spent under fluorescent lights, pounding out intellectual property with somebody else's name on it. Our lives are short - a mere blip among millions of years, and of lives - and then it's done, doused, extinguished, kaput. We don't get another light. It's up to each one of us to settle for a faltering flame or make it a blazing bonfire. Don't settle, and don't teach your children to settle. Other people created this existence that you're settling for, for their own benefit, not yours. If you don't have regular moments of introspection you may not even realize the trap that you're in, the day after day of living your life for nameless, faceless, others when you could be living it for yourself and the people you love. I think the best lesson I taught my kids was this, "Figure out what makes you happy, what really makes you happy - not other people happy - and do it."
User avatar
mtndude3737
Posts: 137
Joined: 8/18/2009
14er Checklist (58)
13er Checklist (2)
Contact:

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby mtndude3737 » Wed Oct 10, 2012 6:29 am

Making other people happy makes me happy. I want my obituary to have two sentences: His family loved him. He died completely worn out in the service of others.
What is there, beyond the mountain, if not the man? - Walter Bonatti

The simpler you make things, the richer the experience becomes. - Steve House
User avatar
susanjoypaul
Posts: 1990
Joined: 9/8/2006
14er Checklist (58)
14ers in Winter (2)
13er Checklist (87)

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby susanjoypaul » Wed Oct 10, 2012 6:53 am

susanjoypaul wrote:I think the best lesson I taught my kids was this, "Figure out what makes you happy, what really makes you happy - not other people happy - and do it."

mtndude3737 wrote:Making other people happy makes me happy. I want my obituary to have two sentences: His family loved him. He died completely worn out in the service of others.

The two are not mutually exclusive :-D
User avatar
mtndude3737
Posts: 137
Joined: 8/18/2009
14er Checklist (58)
13er Checklist (2)
Contact:

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby mtndude3737 » Wed Oct 10, 2012 7:13 am

susanjoypaul wrote:The two are not mutually exclusive :-D


:-k Your literary twist of the dissimilar words "mutually" and "exclusive" has confounded me. However, I was not writing in opposition to your well thought-out summary of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. You merely made me think of how the entire thread applies to me personally. Besides, I would never intentionally be negative and argumentative to a climber such as yourself. :P
What is there, beyond the mountain, if not the man? - Walter Bonatti

The simpler you make things, the richer the experience becomes. - Steve House
User avatar
Obese_goat
Posts: 51
Joined: 8/9/2011
14er Checklist (9)
13er Checklist (5)

Re: Does anyone else ever feel like this?

Postby Obese_goat » Wed Oct 10, 2012 2:18 pm

lmao I had to post this on my face book. I think ColoradoKevin said it best. I use to live for play. Slowly became a live to work kind of guy, and now Im struggling to balance it out. I'm a total dirtball stoner snowboarder stuck in a corporate nice shirt and duck shoes body. Seems I will never have a high paying career because of my commitment to the mountains. All day at work I'm daydreaming about being in the mountains but, there always comes a point when I'm actually out there (generally after I get hurt or am completely exhausted) and I think to myself "Damn it, I've wasted so much time, money, effort, and energy to be here in the mountains right now and I really should have been at work making money for my daughter!" lol I'm hope in due time she will understand and be willing to spend more time with me in the mountains. She is only 6. I'm sure that if the mountain version of myself crossed paths with my corporate self, they would totally smoke weed together for hours and argue about who is living their life properly! lol
“The mountain has left me feeling renewed, more content and positive than I’ve been for weeks, as if something has been given back after a long absence, as if my eyes have opened once again. For this time at least, I’ve let myself be rooted in the unshakable sanity of the senses, spared my mind the burden of too much thinking, turned myself outward to experience the world and inward to savor the pleasures it has given me.”― Richard Nelson

"Going to the mountains is going home.”― John Muir

Return to “General Mountaineering Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: ATOMEMT, brerrabbit, claytonwilliams768, Tim A and 27 guests