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Re: Altitude Sickness

Posted: Thu Aug 06, 2020 11:36 am
by ARY
Thanks for all replies.
ker0uac wrote:
Thu Aug 06, 2020 11:02 am
Now, regarding close substitute to Mt Evans. I assume you want to drive to very high altitudes. If you need paved roads, then Pikes is obviously the closes substitute, followed by mountain passes but I think the highest is ~12k. Guanella Pass and Loveland are good options. If you are ok with rougher roads, and depending on the direction you are coming from, you could try other mountain passes further away from Denver. If you are looking for other "acclimatization" hikes, then you could consider the foothill parks. Higher than Denver but below 10k. Evergreen is a good option. Across from Loveland, there's also Herman Gultch, beautiful easy hike.
Yep, thanks! I looked at Guanella and Herman and I think we could do it if we would feel bad after the first day drive-n-walk at higher altitude. I would be as a backup to do a slow hike to some 12K hill west of Loveland pass. What about Independence pass, and walking the ridge to a small mountain on its north side? Pikes peak from Dillon is like 3 hrs drive, Independence pass is twice faster...

Re: Altitude Sickness

Posted: Thu Aug 06, 2020 11:54 am
by mtree
Sounds like you have a solid plan. You should be fine.

I take visitors from sea level hiking almost every summer. Everyone is different. Some huff a bit, but do just fine straight away. Others, not so much. VERY few have gotten any symptoms of altitude sickness. Maybe a headache. No one has failed or bonked. Although the warnings for sickness is real, I think its pretty rare. But being in good physical shape is a must. I won't take anyone up if I question it or if they have underlying medical issues. Over the years I've tried all the old wives tales for getting acclimated. Nothing but time at high altitude matters. Lots of time...as in days or weeks! (Myself included!) But, just like mountain biking, you'll get in shape quick enough if you just get moving.

That said, your acclimating process will start as soon as you reach high altitudes, but you won't acclimate appreciably over a few days. You'll just get used to it from a physiological standpoint which is a positive benefit in itself. Folks who stay hydrated, eat well, and don't get on the party bus the night before seem to do just fine. Sleep? Well, that's overrated. Get good sleep the night before the night before the hike. That's my motto. And most of all have fun!

Re: Altitude Sickness

Posted: Thu Aug 06, 2020 12:51 pm
by ker0uac
ARY wrote:
Thu Aug 06, 2020 11:36 am
Thanks for all replies.
ker0uac wrote:
Thu Aug 06, 2020 11:02 am
Now, regarding close substitute to Mt Evans. I assume you want to drive to very high altitudes. If you need paved roads, then Pikes is obviously the closes substitute, followed by mountain passes but I think the highest is ~12k. Guanella Pass and Loveland are good options. If you are ok with rougher roads, and depending on the direction you are coming from, you could try other mountain passes further away from Denver. If you are looking for other "acclimatization" hikes, then you could consider the foothill parks. Higher than Denver but below 10k. Evergreen is a good option. Across from Loveland, there's also Herman Gultch, beautiful easy hike.
Yep, thanks! I looked at Guanella and Herman and I think we could do it if we would feel bad after the first day drive-n-walk at higher altitude. I would be as a backup to do a slow hike to some 12K hill west of Loveland pass. What about Independence pass, and walking the ridge to a small mountain on its north side? Pikes peak from Dillon is like 3 hrs drive, Independence pass is twice faster...
For your purposes, I don't see much difference between Independent and Guanella pass, about same altitude, so I would pick based on where I'm driving from. But both are about 2k lower than Pikes.

Re: Altitude Sickness

Posted: Tue Apr 06, 2021 4:55 am
by Selinwine
Of course, this can happen to anyone, so you should be wary of it. So you haven't had any similar situations before? Did it happen suddenly? It's possible that you weren't prepared enough to go out into the mountains back then, wasn't it? I think that back then you had some health problems that you hadn't noticed yet and the altitude made them worse. I really like to go out in the mountains, for me it is a feeling of freedom and joy that cannot be described in words, but I also really worry about how to prepare myself for this and regularly take https://www.healthcanal.com/supplements ... itrim.html for confidence in good health

Re: Altitude Sickness

Posted: Tue Apr 06, 2021 6:12 am
by Salient
Selinwine wrote:
Tue Apr 06, 2021 4:55 am
I never had enough energy, so I was looking for ways to find strength in everything.
Thanks for the bump, this is a very helpful thread.