Campfire on Columbia

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highpilgrim
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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by highpilgrim » Wed Mar 03, 2021 11:28 am

jbealer wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 11:01 am
A good lesson was learned in this thread.
Bear Claw Chris Lapp, after Jeremiah's "hot-coal" bed sets fire to his blankets, Bear Claw looks up from his own bed and says: Didn't put enough dirt down. Saw it right off.

https://clip.cafe/jeremiah-johnson-1972 ... dirt-down/
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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by HikerGuy » Wed Mar 03, 2021 11:38 am

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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by ker0uac » Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:16 pm

I am digressing a bit, but I always wondered if there's anything you can do to "fire-proof" your house. Buildings have fire-rated doors which I think are made out of gypsum. Couldn't one build a gypsum wall around the perimeter of their house? Would that be cost prohibitive or cost effective?
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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by justiner » Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:25 pm

Imma just gunna leave this here

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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by dwoodward13 » Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:33 pm

ker0uac wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:16 pm
I am digressing a bit, but I always wondered if there's anything you can do to "fire-proof" your house. Buildings have fire-rated doors which I think are made out of gypsum. Couldn't one build a gypsum wall around the perimeter of their house? Would that be cost prohibitive or cost effective?
You'd also need to consider flying embers as well. Creating defensible space with no brush/trees/ect is essentially creating a "wall" around your house. And also probably looks nicer :lol:
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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by highpilgrim » Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:40 pm

ker0uac wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:16 pm
but I always wondered if there's anything you can do to "fire-proof" your house
Concrete.

.
1379081112755untitled_20120917_169.jpg
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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by ahogling » Wed Mar 03, 2021 1:03 pm

Thanks Scott for demonstrating responsibility, integrity and honesty. Not easy to do when the world is watching. I would like to think I would do the same but I am not sure.
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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by rijaca » Wed Mar 03, 2021 1:10 pm

ker0uac wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:16 pm
I am digressing a bit, but I always wondered if there's anything you can do to "fire-proof" your house. Buildings have fire-rated doors which I think are made out of gypsum. Couldn't one build a gypsum wall around the perimeter of their house? Would that be cost prohibitive or cost effective?
Fire doors are generally metal. As Pilgrim mentioned concrete works well. Also tile, brick, stone, stucco, and metal works. Gypsum is generally used indoors. Ember intrusion can be prevented with metal screens over vents and under decks.
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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by Chicago Transplant » Wed Mar 03, 2021 1:17 pm

dwoodward13 wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:33 pm
ker0uac wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:16 pm
I am digressing a bit, but I always wondered if there's anything you can do to "fire-proof" your house. Buildings have fire-rated doors which I think are made out of gypsum. Couldn't one build a gypsum wall around the perimeter of their house? Would that be cost prohibitive or cost effective?
You'd also need to consider flying embers as well. Creating defensible space with no brush/trees/ect is essentially creating a "wall" around your house. And also probably looks nicer :lol:
There are a lot of things you can do with the exterior materials, but a lot of people don't want to do them for aesthetic reasons. The big one is not to use wood on the exterior, so instead of wood siding use a noncombustible material like stone, stucco, fiber cement. Not using foam for exterior insulation is better for fire-resistance as well, you can use rock wool instead. Not using wood shakes on your roof, use asphalt shingles. Some juristictions in the WUI (wildland-urban interface) ban certain wood material already. Code does not wood above 60' from grade due to fire fighting access and requires it to be fire-resistance treated at 40' and foam plastic insulation does not pass required tests with certain claddings (i.e wood siding). The other design issues come from decks/balconies and trim material (i.e. around windows or eaves). People still tend to do those out of wood but there are fiber cement trim boards available and decking out of Redwood is more fire-resistive than other wood products or even synthetic decking, Redwood is a Class B fire rating.
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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by climbingcue » Wed Mar 03, 2021 2:13 pm

ker0uac wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:16 pm
I am digressing a bit, but I always wondered if there's anything you can do to "fire-proof" your house. Buildings have fire-rated doors which I think are made out of gypsum. Couldn't one build a gypsum wall around the perimeter of their house? Would that be cost prohibitive or cost effective?
I have a friend that had a house that survive the Grand Lake fire last year. If you house makes it through, you still have to deal with all the smoke damage. He also had to replace all the windows in the house because of heat, not because of broken glass.
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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by madbuck » Wed Mar 03, 2021 9:49 pm

Wow, definitely learned a lot myself, especially given that 2 parties thought the fire was out in those winter temps and conditions.
It's almost a paradoxical risk in that a fire that smolders under snow would not consume its fuel source or get as much attention as a flame.

Sorry that you went through that stress and concern, Scott, and very laudable that you spoke up when many would not have. (Heck, nobody would have known, whereas so many people these days will deny things that have direct evidence!)
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Re: Campfire on Columbia

Post by ker0uac » Thu Mar 04, 2021 8:19 am

I understand if you are building or gut rehabbing a house, but I was wondering what to do around the perimeter if you already have a house that was built back when the world wasn't burning down. In LA, so many houses are at constant risk and are being sold below market coz nobody wants a hot potato. But lots of them have plenty of land around the perimeter that could be used to build barriers. Anyways, just curious.
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