Boots

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brankulo
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Boots

Post by brankulo » Sun May 08, 2016 5:17 pm

What is everyones favourite boot/shoe? I am looking for recommendation for ones best suitable for class 3 and up day hikes. I have been doing fine in sneakers so far (510 ascents) but they are falling apart.
Thanks
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polar
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Re: Boots

Post by polar » Sun May 08, 2016 5:55 pm

Whatever shoe fits you the best. It's really personal preference. Some people like trail runners, some people like approach shoes, some people just use regular hiking shoes.

BTW the Five Ten Ascent is more than just sneakers. They have sticky rubber soles, make them better than your regular Nike or Puma for scrambling.
"Getting to the bottom, OPTIONAL. Getting to the top, MANDATORY!" - The Wisest Trail Sign
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fahixson
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Re: Boots

Post by fahixson » Sun May 08, 2016 6:00 pm

You'll find lots of shoe/boot threads on the forum. Seems like the consensus is try a bunch on and see what feels the best cause every foot is different. Admittedly, trying them on in a store, even running around a little or on their treadmill, doesn't really tell you everything you need to know.

My current preference is the New Balance Leadville trail runners for anything Class 1/2 and LS Boulder X approach shoes for Class 3/4. I'll even hike to camp in the Leadvilles and pack the LS for summit day if we're packing in for something like Snowmass or Needle. Carrying two pairs of shoes is probably overkill but I don't mind the extra weight and sacrificial shoes are good for getting around muddy lakes.

I haven't worn boots in a long time but you'll find plenty of others that do. We're also generally hiking spring/summer/fall, so minimal snow travel.
brankulo
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Re: Boots

Post by brankulo » Sun May 08, 2016 8:14 pm

polar wrote: BTW the Five Ten Ascent is more than just sneakers. They have sticky rubber soles, make them better than your regular Nike or Puma for scrambling.
I know, these are primarily my biking shoes but i ended up wearing them for hikes as well, as i like them a lot. might just get another pair. cant really grasp the idea of wearing boots really, especially for day hikes and scrambling over rocks, where i need to feel the rock surface / texture. but thats me. only hike in summer/fall. my hiking buddy wears some sort of high leather hiking boots that weigh a ton for the very same trips. i just find it ridiculous.
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polar
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Re: Boots

Post by polar » Sun May 08, 2016 9:31 pm

No need for high top boots unless you need or believe in the ankle support they offer. Since the Ascent seems to be working for you, I'd just get another pair, or look at some other Five Ten offerings. The Guide Tennie is one of the most popular approach shoes, they offer a pretty good compromise between hiking and scrambling.

http://www.fiveten.com/us/closeouts/outdoor" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Last edited by polar on Tue May 10, 2016 4:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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kingshimmers
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Re: Boots

Post by kingshimmers » Tue May 10, 2016 2:52 pm

I really like hiking in my trail runners too, but it becomes problematic on wet and/or slushy trails. So back last fall, I decided to try out Vasque's goretex running/hiking shoes. They're a heavier than normal trail runners, but still responsive and nowhere near as cumbersome as actual hiking boots. They also seem to hold up way better than Merrells, IMO. Just another option out there for you - it took me an embarrassingly long time to figure out that goretex sneakers were a thing, haha.
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metalmountain
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Re: Boots

Post by metalmountain » Tue May 10, 2016 3:44 pm

polar wrote:No need for hike top boots unless you need or believe in the ankle support they offer. Since the Ascent seems to be working for you, I'd just get another pair, or look at some other Five Ten offerings. The Guide Tennie is one of the most popular approach shoes, they offer a pretty good compromise between hiking and scrambling.

http://www.fiveten.com/us/closeouts/outdoor" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

5.10 guide's come in mid tops as well. My ankles are a bit wobbly so I love them. Still flexible enough to actually rock climb in and I don't roll my ankles all the time, and they are super light as well. The make a goretex version too. Can't say enough good things about these shoes.

http://goo.gl/K5ECKW" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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polar
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Re: Boots

Post by polar » Tue May 10, 2016 4:02 pm

kingshimmers wrote:I really like hiking in my trail runners too.
Nothing useful to add other than love your avatar.

Edited to add: Since I’m wasting screen space, I might as well make my post a bit more useful.

Shoes that climb really well (rock shoes, Gandas, etc) will inevitably not hike very well, and shoes that are super comfy and supportive when hiking will probably not climb very well. You can compensate for this by being a very strong climber (like Alex Honnold and Tommy Caldwell soloing 5.11s in their approach shoes), which bring me to another point: when someone recommends a pair of shoes and say “I can climb 5.9 with these”, take that with a grain of salt. How strong of a climber are they? Were they free soloing, leading, or toproping? Do they warm up on 5.12s, or hangdog 5.9s? There are many variables. I can probably scratch and claw my way up a juggy 5.easy in a pair of snowshoes on toprope, but I wouldn’t say snowshoes are great for scrambling.
Last edited by polar on Tue May 10, 2016 4:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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TallGrass
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Re: Boots

Post by TallGrass » Tue May 10, 2016 4:17 pm

Many just use what they're comfortable with, the devil they know. Others have a list of things they want. The majority (69%) of CO 14er standard routes don't exceed Class 2 so just about anything will "work" in summer.

I've used from light, minimalist to feature-laden, padded footwear and like my jungle boots ala a multi-tool. Some factors I consider are: keeping scree and pebbles out (no need for gaiters), toe and heal protection, breathable, dry quick, tie quick, grip and smear well, flexible forefoot but rigid enough sole for talus (Converse Chuck Taylors grip great but suck for even cobblestone streets). I like to be able go from city to trail, talus, scree, 5.7+, scrambling, strap crampons or spikes, and camping all without needing other footwear. Foot goes in the creek? Shake em out, change socks, and carry on. Sharp rock edge runs against toe, heel, or ankle? Covered. Need to kick or stomp something (like a trailer connector)? All good. Goretex and padding only seem to trap water and perspiration while taking forever to dry.

So what ever you choose, pick what suits you and your demands, including any special needs (support, pronation, toe box room, ...). Even if only flip flops, keep back up footwear back at your vehicle and use trekking poles to minimize foot and knee impact.
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AlexeyD
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Re: Boots

Post by AlexeyD » Tue May 10, 2016 4:29 pm

brankulo wrote:I am looking for recommendation for ones best suitable for class 3 and up day hikes.
For these purposes, I like the La Sportiva Boulder X a lot. Great grip for the slabs and scrambling, but enough support (at least for me) for those long approaches and scree-slogs. Of course, this comes at a price: the Boulder X is far from the lightest approach shoe out there, and the leather outer material isn't ideal for very wet conditions.

For days involving substantial travel on snow and/or mud or wet trails (i.e. early and late season), I like the Vasque Breeze hiking boots. Still fairly lightweight, comfortable, and grippy enough for 3rd or 4th class, but the GTX membrane keeps the moisture out, and the sole is stiff enough for universal crampon us on moderately steep, firm snow.
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kingshimmers
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Re: Boots

Post by kingshimmers » Tue May 31, 2016 3:13 pm

polar wrote:
Nothing useful to add other than love your avatar.
Thanks polar!
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