Hunting Season

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stephakett
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Re: Hunting Season

Post by stephakett »

eaagaard wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 4:24 pm Anyone who doesn’t positively identify their target before pulling the trigger isn’t responsible enough to own a weapon. It makes me sick that this isn’t plain simple common sense. It’s certainly what my dad taught me.

All rights come with associated responsibility. Too many people forget that in today’s culture.

Ok, I am done.
+1 for basic gun safety
+1 for hunter education

negligence is a crime and is what the suspect(s) are being prosecuted for, but please don't blame CPW or the general hunting population (who contributes a GREAT DEAL MORE to conservation efforts than any other outdoor use group) for this mistake. this behavior was reckless.

my sincerest condolences go out to the family of the deceased, but i'll spare little to no sympathy for the suspects.
“My father considered a walk among the mountains as the equivalent of churchgoing.” (Aldous Huxley)
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Trotter
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Re: Hunting Season

Post by Trotter »

stephakett wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 10:37 am
JChitwood wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 10:19 am You need all the help you can get to survive the typical hunter who has been up all night drinking then goes straight to the field with guns loaded.
whoa. easy, dude.

accidents happen and i sincerely hope the hunters involved in this incident are never able to pull tags again. but assuming everyone trying to feed their families for the next year is drunk and irresponsible is pretty overreaching.
+1
After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. -Nelson Mandela
Whenever I climb I am followed by a dog called Ego. -Nietzsche
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stephakett
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Re: Hunting Season

Post by stephakett »

12ersRule wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 4:15 pm I don't get the whole 'wear orange' thing. Aren't some elk almost orange colored? At least, they're a helluva lot closer to orange than the usual blues/gray coloring I have on.
allegedly deer/elk see colors like red and orange differently than humans do. obviously if you cover yourself head to toe in solid, blaze orange, the animal will be able to identify your solid mass, but flashes of blaze or fluoro pink are difficult for them to identify.
“My father considered a walk among the mountains as the equivalent of churchgoing.” (Aldous Huxley)
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mtree
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Re: Hunting Season

Post by mtree »

stephakett wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 4:37 pm
12ersRule wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 4:15 pm I don't get the whole 'wear orange' thing. Aren't some elk almost orange colored? At least, they're a helluva lot closer to orange than the usual blues/gray coloring I have on.
allegedly deer/elk see colors like red and orange differently than humans do. obviously if you cover yourself head to toe in solid, blaze orange, the animal will be able to identify your solid mass, but flashes of blaze or fluoro pink are difficult for them to identify.
That's not quite how it works. Obviously, we can't see what a deer/elk see. The real reason for the bright colors (ORANGE) is virtually ALL HUMANS can see it easily. That's what really matters. The animal has no idea what you are... except not something they want to chat with. They have a keen awareness of movement with both eyes and ears - waaaay better than we do - and they'll use that to spot unsavory movements. Very important tip-off for hunters. Both also have excellent night vision picking up more ultraviolent ends of the spectrum. Who knows what that means in reality? But they probably see you at night long before you see them. Overall, its not really the color that matters. Its the movement and pattern.

That brings us back to the blaze hunting colors. Around 10% of men have some red-green color blind, plus the colors mute quickly in the dark. That makes red a double whammy. Another reason blue isn't used, it appears grey to black very quickly without light on it. So the object of the blaze colors is for humans to see most easily at dawn and dusk. The animals are looking for other cues to spot predators. My guess is the best hunter is probably one who is color blind! They naturally look for sizes, shapes, and movement and aren't throw off by colors.
- I didn't say it was your fault. I said I was blaming you.
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nyker
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Re: Hunting Season

Post by nyker »

I remember hiking in from Frenchman Creek one October morning and passed two bowhunters, one in a treestand and another walking, the tree standguy was in 100% camo and we barely saw him until I saw him move. We had blaze orange caps on and orange vests. I think the key was yes the color but also talking - yea it might have spooked a buck that otherwise could have been fair game for the hunters but talking fairly frequently and not that softly made our presence known. Sound carries pretty well in the quiet predawn hours when there is no wind. By design, archery hunters need to be closer to their prey than when using a rifle.
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Re: Hunting Season

Post by pvnisher »

Forget tree stands and blinds.
Go heli-hunting.
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