Dog Boots

Dogs, dogs and even some cats
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chicagostylehotdog
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Dog Boots

Post by chicagostylehotdog » Mon Jul 16, 2018 2:40 pm

Can anybody provide recommendations for dog booties?
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highpilgrim
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Re: Dog Boots

Post by highpilgrim » Mon Jul 16, 2018 2:42 pm

I recommend you walk your dog on hard surfaces, a little at a time, until they are built up and capable of longer hikes.

This works well.
Call on God, but row away from the rocks.
Hunter S Thompson

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stephakett
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Re: Dog Boots

Post by stephakett » Mon Jul 16, 2018 3:02 pm

i had the luxury of progressing through hiking skills with my dog. in our years together over +90% of my summit list and many, MANY, MANY walks, hikes, runs, camp and backyard-time beyond, he has only mildly scratched a single paw one time skirting off-route around shavano while running from a storm.

if you are not patient enough to work through this with your dog naturally (remember wild dogs, wolves, coyotes, foxes, and any other canidae family members do not wear booties) then i would recommend Ruffwear. it will likely take some adjustment time for your dog to be comfortable with them on, but they make very high quality products and i'd trust them with absolutely anything for my dog.
during the winter i cheat mother nature a little, and use Mushers Secret Paw Wax ~biweekly to help Archer's feet endure the harsh snow-time chemicals used on streets (which are not naturally-occuring).
“My father considered a walk among the mountains as the equivalent of churchgoing.” (Aldous Huxley)
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stoopdude
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Re: Dog Boots

Post by stoopdude » Mon Jul 16, 2018 3:12 pm

Ruffwear. My dog doesn't "like" them, but he forgets about them within minutes. More importantly, they cinch down really tight and he can't easily get them off. They're kind of expensive ($70ish for a set of 4) but they work really well.
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mtcorcoran
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Re: Dog Boots

Post by mtcorcoran » Sat Jul 28, 2018 1:44 pm

Pawz is a thin bootie, a waterproof barrier - not breathable, though
~Meesh the mountain goat
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ATOMEMT
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Re: Dog Boots

Post by ATOMEMT » Sat Jul 28, 2018 2:34 pm

Stephakett kinda' nailed it here.
+1 on Ruffwear products and Mushers Secret too.
Slowly evolving your pups paw tolerance / durability...and one can usually avoid boots all together.
Unless you're going full on beast mode scree/talus suffer fest.
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jbealer
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Re: Dog Boots

Post by jbealer » Mon Jul 30, 2018 11:16 am

Dogbooties.com cheep when you lose one but hold up on our mountains!
No Mountain too steep, No trail too long....
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bwinners
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Re: Dog Boots

Post by bwinners » Tue Jul 31, 2018 11:23 am

I just started using Ruffwear boots on my dog. She wound up going for a swim in them and they were fine. She was used to them pretty quickly.

So I've had my dog for over 3 years now and we've done many, many, MANY hikes. But her paws just don't get used to rocks. She constantly cuts them. I thought overtime they would develop the way you guys are all describing, but that hasn't happened yet, thus why I've started putting her in boots. I'm not sure if this has anything to do with her being 3-legged and perhaps gripping the ground differently, but what else can I do to help her out a little more? I'd prefer for her to not have to wear boots, as would she I'm sure.
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