Running a peak: What it takes

Colorado peak questions, condition requests and other info.
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RETEP 1
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by RETEP 1 » Sat Apr 17, 2021 3:01 pm

jmanner wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 12:43 pm
BillMiddlebrook wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 12:30 pm
And you must not stop running when passing others, even as you blast down Grays on a summer Saturday.
Real runners go before or after work on a week day. Everyone knows this.
We have our first rule!!!✅
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JQDivide
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by JQDivide » Sat Apr 17, 2021 6:10 pm

How much of the trail/route do you have to actually run/jog to count it as running a peak? Is there a percentage?
Does a fast walk count?
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by d_baker » Sat Apr 17, 2021 6:22 pm

Ran to treeline because of thunder and lightning.
There's a checkmark! ✔
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by RETEP 1 » Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:29 pm

JQDivide wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 6:10 pm
How much of the trail/route do you have to actually run/jog to count it as running a peak? Is there a percentage?
Does a fast walk count?
Hmmm...I say put a check mark based on your own convictions. Capitol is the one peak I’ve done but haven’t run. I did it in 2017 with a friend because of all the craziness. I could only get him to run a mile or two. Definitely gonna go back this summer and knock it out...
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jmanner
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by jmanner » Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:31 pm

RETEP 1 wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:29 pm
JQDivide wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 6:10 pm
How much of the trail/route do you have to actually run/jog to count it as running a peak? Is there a percentage?
Does a fast walk count?
Hmmm...I say put a check mark based on your own convictions. Capitol is the one peak I’ve done but haven’t run. I did it in 2017 with a friend because of all the craziness. I could only get him to run a mile or two. Definitely gonna go back this summer and knock it out...
I am fascinated to know what min/mile you consider “running”, particularly as an average over the course of the peak’s distance.
A man has got to know his limitations.-Dr. Jonathan Hemlock or Harry Callahan or something F' it: http://youtu.be/lpzqQst-Sg8

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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by cougar » Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:39 pm

The skimo standard is 5000 ft per hour elevation gain, so running must be much faster than that.

https://14ers.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=59436
Last edited by cougar on Sat Apr 17, 2021 8:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by jmanner » Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:44 pm

cougar wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:39 pm
The skimo standard is 5000 ft per hour elevation gain, so running must be much faster than that.
5,000’/hour! 🤣
A man has got to know his limitations.-Dr. Jonathan Hemlock or Harry Callahan or something F' it: http://youtu.be/lpzqQst-Sg8

'Life is too short to ski groomers'

"That man's only desire was to stand, once only, on the summit of that glorious wedge of rock...I think anyone who loves the mountains as much as that can claim to be a mountaineer, too."-Hermann Buhl, Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by Carl_Healy » Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:47 pm

What about speed walking peaks?
If you can't run, you walk
If you can't walk, you crawl
If you can't crawl, you find someone to carry you
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by BillMiddlebrook » Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:47 pm

jmanner wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:44 pm
cougar wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:39 pm
The skimo standard is 5000 ft per hour elevation gain, so running must be much faster than that.
5,000’/hour! 🤣
Downhill? No probz
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by RETEP 1 » Sat Apr 17, 2021 9:27 pm

jmanner wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:31 pm
RETEP 1 wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:29 pm
JQDivide wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 6:10 pm
How much of the trail/route do you have to actually run/jog to count it as running a peak? Is there a percentage?
Does a fast walk count?
Hmmm...I say put a check mark based on your own convictions. Capitol is the one peak I’ve done but haven’t run. I did it in 2017 with a friend because of all the craziness. I could only get him to run a mile or two. Definitely gonna go back this summer and knock it out...
I am fascinated to know what min/mile you consider “running”, particularly as an average over the course of the peak’s distance.
I guess what Anton considers running vs what I consider running vs what you consider running are all pretty different and depend on the peak. The closest I ever got to Anton was 28 min mile on hourglass, LB-Blanca traverse. I guess running approaches and climbing class 4...but somewhere between 12-15 for a class 2 14er is what I consider running.
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by ekalina » Sat Apr 17, 2021 9:38 pm

What footwear do you running folks wear for an outing that requires running+scrambling? I want to run the approaches but bring something that works for the scrambling that comes later, too.
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by aholle88 » Sat Apr 17, 2021 9:39 pm

According to the Strava, Joe Gray did the uphill portion of Quandary in 47:43, for an avg of ~15min/mi (3.3k gain over 3.18mi). That's 4230ft/hr. So ~15min/mile, or 4230ft/hr is about the fastest anyone is going to move uphill at an average 20% grade on trail, using this single study. Most of the peaks average right around this grade. Some less, some more, but most of the routes that are on a trail, especially the above treeline portion, are about this grade (anywhere from 18-30% typically). So that's the gold standard right there. To delve a little further, there are ~1500 strava logs of the quandary ascent. #150 is around 1:21, or a 25min/mile pace. #75 is at 1:13, 23min/mile. So the top 5-10% of strava-ers have at least a 2500-2800ft/hr uphill pace. Based on this very scientific information, we could presume the top 5-10% of strava-ers that logged these attempts as what is considered "running" up a mountain, in terms of uphill pace.

Round Trip Times:
1. Joe Gray -> 1:15 (11:36/mile)
75. 2:01 (18:32/mile)
150. 2:17 (21:00/mile)

So, if your round trip time on a mountain with an avg of 20% grade is roughly >3mph, then you are "running", according to Strava science. Just a casual walk around the grocery store :-D
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