Running a peak: What it takes

Colorado peak questions, condition requests and other info.
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madbuck
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by madbuck » Sun Apr 18, 2021 10:55 pm

Good riffs and humblebrags here.
But seriously, conditions matter: are we talking average snowpack?
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by timisimaginary » Mon Apr 19, 2021 12:13 pm

pizza-sandwich wrote:
Sun Apr 18, 2021 10:55 am
no no no this is the internet where the stakes are life and death.

we’re going to find out right here and now what running is!
running: sometimes both feet are off the ground, sometimes one foot is on the ground, never are both feet on the ground
walking: sometimes both feet are on the ground, sometimes one foot is on the ground, never are both feet off the ground

you're welcome.

btw, you actually can "run" at speeds of 2mph or slower. i speak from experience.
RETEP 1 wrote:
Sun Apr 18, 2021 11:26 am
I can get on board with adventure running! So start a new thread? 😂😂
can't we just call it "trail running" like everyone else? i think it's pretty well understood that trail running often involves some degree of hiking.
i like "adventure running" for bigger trail running endeavors that entail some added degree of effort or risk. if i'm going out for a really hilly but short or easy trail run that i end up hiking half the time, i'd feel kinda goofy telling someone i'm going out for an adventure run.
social distancing since the day i was born...
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by LarryM » Mon Apr 19, 2021 12:39 pm

I’m old and slow, so this is not a humble brag by any means. But, focusing on the uphill, I’d argue that the strict definitions of mountain running that most of you are advocating don’t comport with how the term is used by most people who consider themselves mountain runners, and are strict enough that they include only elite or near elite athletes.

Let’s look at Strava, Bierstadt specifically. Again, uphill only. 2,081 people have “run” Bierstadt, i.e., posted a Bierstadt climb as a run. Let’s look at the top 10%. An hour and eleven minutes, an average pace of 19:38 puts you in the top 10%. How about the top one third?. I’ll go with my best time, roughly 31st percentile. That’s a time of 1:30, or 24.51 per mile. Is that mountain running? Most Strava users who “run” Bierstadt would consider that a fairly decent time, but by most of the definitions here that would fall far short.

A 13er example, Audubon (again, TH to summit):

top 10%: 1:15, 19:37 / mile. Actually, that's just outside the top 10%, and is ... Cordis Hall (I'm sure though far from a max effort for him).
top 25% (my best time): 1:25, 22:03 / mile.

Of course I’m sure I’ll get a number of “LOL Strava users” type comments. Point is, among people who consider themselves trail runners, the standards for a mountain run are much more lax than most of the responses here.

Moving on to Ultra running, if we go by JManner’s definition, most Ultra-runners are not “runners.” Which seems counter intuitive to me. No disrespect to John, who often gives me kudos on Strava, even for my slow-ass “runs.” :)
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by Monster5 » Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:21 pm

All I know is, I'd take Quad Rock or Dirty 30 over some Moab ultra any day. Mostly because there's 50% more running involved with the latter.
50 mi/3k gain is an effing nightmare. 50 mi and 10k though?? Yeah, buddy. I can hike all day long.
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by LarryM » Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:22 pm

Monster5 wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:21 pm
All I know is, I'd take Quad Rock or Dirty 30 over some Moab ultra any day. Mostly because there's 50% more running involved with the latter.
50 mi/3k gain is an effing nightmare. 50 mi and 10k though?? Yeah, buddy. I can hike all day long.
QFT
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by 12ersRule » Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:32 pm

Monster5 wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:21 pm
All I know is, I'd take Quad Rock or Dirty 30 over some Moab ultra any day. Mostly because there's 50% more running involved with the latter.
50 mi/3k gain is an effing nightmare. 50 mi and 10k though?? Yeah, buddy. I can hike all day long.
Funny. I just ran 50+ miles on the roads, and your QR50 pace was faster than my road pace.
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by LarryM » Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:41 pm

12ersRule wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:32 pm
Monster5 wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:21 pm
All I know is, I'd take Quad Rock or Dirty 30 over some Moab ultra any day. Mostly because there's 50% more running involved with the latter.
50 mi/3k gain is an effing nightmare. 50 mi and 10k though?? Yeah, buddy. I can hike all day long.
Funny. I just ran 50+ miles on the roads, and your QR50 pace was faster than my road pace.
That was a solid effort but I'd rather eat ground glass than run that many miles on the flat/road.
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by FireOnTheMountain » Mon Apr 19, 2021 3:29 pm

Monster5 wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:21 pm
50 mi/3k gain is an effing nightmare. 50 mi and 10k though?? Yeah, buddy. I can hike all day long.
This all day long. Goat legs for the win. Although good luck on that stretch back to the finish...the flat runnable valley floor annihilated me my first go on the 50.
Everyday is a G r A t E f U L Day here in the ID...?
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by madbuck » Mon Apr 19, 2021 3:59 pm

12ersRule wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:32 pm
Funny. I just ran 50+ miles on the roads, and your QR50 pace was faster than my road pace.
That looks like a nice and terrible idea Dave...great job! Wish I'd known and been around to throw empty beer cans at you.
Are you going to do more road stuff, or back to the trails?
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by 12ersRule » Mon Apr 19, 2021 4:07 pm

madbuck wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 3:59 pm
12ersRule wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:32 pm
Funny. I just ran 50+ miles on the roads, and your QR50 pace was faster than my road pace.
That looks like a nice and terrible idea Dave...great job! Wish I'd known and been around to throw empty beer cans at you.
Are you going to do more road stuff, or back to the trails?
Back to the trails if they ever dry out! Will we ever have a trail running season this year? Haha.
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by AnnaG22 » Mon Apr 19, 2021 6:29 pm

LarryM wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 12:39 pm
edited to condense multiple super valid points.

Of course I’m sure I’ll get a number of “LOL Strava users” type comments. Point is, among people who consider themselves trail runners, the standards for a mountain run are much more lax than most of the responses here.

Moving on to Ultra running, if we go by JManner’s definition, most Ultra-runners are not “runners.” Which seems counter intuitive to me. No disrespect to John, who often gives me kudos on Strava, even for my slow-ass “runs.” :)
=D> =D> =D>

Can we get any of the members who have successfully completed (or even just attempted) Nolan's to weigh in? I'd put $50 down that not a single one of them was moving at a run pace for more than 70% max of their total time. And yet I'd argue they all merit the descriptor of mountain runner.
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Re: Running a peak: What it takes

Post by aholle88 » Mon Apr 19, 2021 7:19 pm

AnnaG22 wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 6:29 pm
Can we get any of the members who have successfully completed (or even just attempted) Nolan's to weigh in? I'd put $50 down that not a single one of them was moving at a run pace for more than 70% max of their total time. And yet I'd argue they all merit the descriptor of mountain runner.
I’ve always liked the way Kilgore/Baldwin and crew describe it: “moving efficiently through the mountains”. Ultimately that’s what we are all talking about here. That’s just way too long to be a label lol

And Ryan, how about the Ouray 50/100? That’s really where it’s at for ultras, 20k for the 50 and 40k for the 100. Not much of that flat running crap there!
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