Biggest change in elevation.

14ers in California and Washington state or any other peak in the USA
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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by screeman57 » Sat Mar 21, 2020 7:37 pm

OrngChocD wrote:
Sat Mar 21, 2020 7:05 pm
Both Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa on the Big Island of Hawaii are visible from the coast at some spots.
From Poli Poli state park at about 7,000ft on the side of Haleakala, you can see the entirety of both, from the breakers on the beach to the snow-capped summits.
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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by Scott P » Sun Mar 22, 2020 8:57 am

jdorje wrote:
Sat Mar 21, 2020 12:40 pm
The Diamond on Longs and the Painted Wall in the Black Canyon are probably the tallest sheer faces in Colorado - very roughly 2000 vertical over 0 horizontal.
The Painted Wall is indeed the highest cliff in Colorado, but the Diamond isn't #2. There are cliffs in Dinosaur National Monument that are higher than the Diamond and they are just as sheer. The Diamond is quite a bit less than 2000 feet vertical as well.
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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by Scott P » Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:06 am

Jbrow327 wrote:
Sat Mar 21, 2020 12:02 am
know the Himalayas are the highest but I don't know if they also have the most vertical rise.
They do. Everest does not, but some of the Himalaya rises from almost sea level.

The only peaks that can rival the rise of the Greater Himalyan region are St Elias, Denali, and perhaps the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta.
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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by Jbrow327 » Sun Mar 22, 2020 11:11 am

Scott P wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:06 am
Jbrow327 wrote:
Sat Mar 21, 2020 12:02 am
know the Himalayas are the highest but I don't know if they also have the most vertical rise.
They do. Everest does not, but some of the Himalaya rises from almost sea level.

The only peaks that can rival the rise of the Greater Himalyan region are St Elias, Denali, and perhaps the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta.
Thanks Scott and everyone else. Which Himalayan mountains rise from sea level? If I'm standing in orem looking at the top of mount timpanogas, how does that compare to standing at the bottom of Everest looking at the top? How many times higher would it be than timpanogas? Meaning, how many more timpanogas would I have to visually stack on top to get Everest?
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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by Scott P » Sun Mar 22, 2020 8:34 pm

Jbrow327 wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 11:11 am
Thanks Scott and everyone else. Which Himalayan mountains rise from sea level?
Near sea level rather than sea level.

Some of the peaks around both the eastern and western borders of Nepal rise from near sea level.

Since the peaks aren't quite as high though, there are still areas with greater relief.

Here are some I can think of:

Phewa Lake is at about 2500 feet elevation and some of the peaks visible from it area above 26,000 feet, so the elevation change is around 23,500 feet. The most beautiful peak as seen from the lake (at least in my opinion) is Machupuchare, which is "only" about 20,000 feet above the lake:

Image

Annapurna, Dhalagiri, and Manaslu are all visible from the lake and the hills above the lake.

Nanga Parbat rises 23,500 feet above the Indus Valley in the distance of 15 miles.

Image

Namche Barwa rises about 22,400 feet above the valley:

Image

Outside the Himalayan region, St Elias (18,008 feet) besically rises from the ocean:

Image

The Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta in Colombia rises from the beaches as well, but not quite in the same dramatic fasion as St Elias. You can see glaciers while sitting on the beach along the Caribbean. The highest peak is around 18,800 feet.

If I'm standing in orem looking at the top of mount timpanogas, how does that compare to standing at the bottom of Everest looking at the top?
The base is high, so the relief isn't as great as some other peaks in the Himalaya. Base camp to the summit is around 12,000 feet of gain (at least on the Nepal side) and is just less than double the relief of Mount Timpanogos from the Utah Valley.
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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by Jbrow327 » Sun Mar 22, 2020 10:17 pm

Scott P wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 8:34 pm
Jbrow327 wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 11:11 am
Thanks Scott and everyone else. Which Himalayan mountains rise from sea level?
Near sea level rather than sea level.

Some of the peaks around both the eastern and western borders of Nepal rise from near sea level.

Since the peaks aren't quite as high though, there are still areas with greater relief.

Here are some I can think of:

Phewa Lake is at about 2500 feet elevation and some of the peaks visible from it area above 26,000 feet, so the elevation change is around 23,500 feet. The most beautiful peak as seen from the lake (at least in my opinion) is Machupuchare, which is "only" about 20,000 feet above the lake:

Image

Annapurna, Dhalagiri, and Manaslu are all visible from the lake and the hills above the lake.

Nanga Parbat rises 23,500 feet above the Indus Valley in the distance of 15 miles.

Image

Namche Barwa rises about 22,400 feet above the valley:

Image

Outside the Himalayan region, St Elias (18,008 feet) besically rises from the ocean:

Image

The Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta in Colombia rises from the beaches as well, but not quite in the same dramatic fasion as St Elias. You can see glaciers while sitting on the beach along the Caribbean. The highest peak is around 18,800 feet.

If I'm standing in orem looking at the top of mount timpanogas, how does that compare to standing at the bottom of Everest looking at the top?
The base is high, so the relief isn't as great as some other peaks in the Himalaya. Base camp to the summit is around 12,000 feet of gain (at least on the Nepal side) and is just less than double the relief of Mount Timpanogos from the Utah Valley.
Thanks a bunch Scott. Mount saint elias has that awesome look that makes it look even more prominent than the Himalayan ones, even though it's not. Do you know if there are any unscaled Himalayan mountains? How about any in utah or Colorado? Thanks.
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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by Scott P » Sun Mar 22, 2020 10:52 pm

Jbrow327 wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 10:17 pm
Do you know if there are any unscaled Himalayan mountains?
There are a lot of them that aren't.
How about any in utah or Colorado?
Utah has quite a few, all of them in the desert or the lower elevation ranges. Red Castle was probably the last of the major alpine peaks climbed and wasn't climbed until 6/30/2014.

Colorado has some, mostly in the Western part of the state.
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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by Dontap » Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:00 pm

The Tallest mountain on land measured from the base of the mountain to the summit is Denali. Base of mountain in the tundra is around 2000 feet and summit is over 20,000 with a total relief of 18,005 feet. Highest rise of any land mountain from the bottom of the mountain to the top. However, the Tallest mountain anywhere on the planet from top to bottom.would be Hawaii. Since it is reality the tip.of a much bigger mountain with its summit sticking out of the ocean it is by far the tallest 'peak' on the globe
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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by Scott P » Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:23 pm

Dontap wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:00 pm
The Tallest mountain on land measured from the base of the mountain to the summit is Denali.
Not so. Several Himalayan peaks exceed this. So does Mt St Elias, but not by much. See a few posts back.
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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by MUni Rider » Mon Mar 23, 2020 11:54 pm

If you are looking for the steepest from sea level to peak over the shortest distance, I'd say Ball's Pyramid is hard to beat. It is 1,844 ft high, while measuring only 3,600 ft in length and 980 ft across. It rises directly out of the ocean.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ball%27s_Pyramid

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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by ltlFish99 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 2:13 am

Mauna Kea is the tallest mountain on earth from base to summit at 33,500 feet.
Its summit is 13,803 above sea level, the rest is underwater. The book, "mountains from space" has an incredible picture of it, I don't have an electronic copy to post.
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Re: Biggest change in elevation.

Post by martinleroux » Tue Mar 24, 2020 9:54 am

Scott P wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:23 pm
Dontap wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:00 pm
The Tallest mountain on land measured from the base of the mountain to the summit is Denali.
Not so. Several Himalayan peaks exceed this. So does Mt St Elias, but not by much. See a few posts back.
It depends what you mean by "base", which isn't a clearly-defined concept. Here's a very short list of rough estimates based on my own, arbitrary judgement as to what constitutes a "base":

Denali: 3,600m above the Kahiltna Glacier (9km distance)
Mt Blanc: 3,600m above Les Bossons (8km)
Mt Logan: 4,000m above the Seward Glacier (7km)
Mt St Elias: 4,500m above the Libby Glacier (7km)
Nanga Parbat: 4,500m above the Rupal Valley (4.5km)
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