What's your favorite mountaineering books?

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greenonion
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by greenonion »

highpilgrim wrote: Sun Jan 24, 2021 1:32 pm
CoHi591 wrote: Sun Jan 24, 2021 6:29 am "I didn't want to climb the Eiger, I only wanted to have climbed it"
It’s funny how dangerous and risky the Eiger has been historically and took days to climb as well. And now the current speed record last I looked is about 2 1/3 hours! Amazing how far climbers have progressed.

RIP Ueli.

I still can’t believe he’s gone.
Wakin on a Pretty Day
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Bale
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by Bale »

Ok, you sucked me in with Krakauer, one of my all time faves. The quote is from when he and Mark Twight (known as Marc then), attempted North Face Eiger. “Marc wanted very badly to climb the Eiger, while I wanted very badly only to have climbed the Eiger. Marc, understand, is at that age when the pituitary secretes an overabundance of those hormones that mask the subtler emotions, such as fear. He tends to confuse things like life-or-death climbing with fun. As a friendly gesture, I planned to let Marc lead all the most fun pitches on the Nordwand.”
I have read all of Krakauer’s books except “Missoula”. From where I sit, his critics have some legit nit-picking but not much of a case.
Into Thin Air. It was Jon’s opinion that Boukreev should have been on O2 since he was guiding. I don’t have a problem with it. At worst, he was guilty of not giving Anatoli enough credit for his heroic deeds in the storm.
Three Cups of Deceit. No doubt Greg Mortenson has done some great things with the schools, but I think Jon was right to expose some of the shady finances.
Missoula. Like I said, I haven’t read it but I think the residents of Missoula were pissed at the name since Anytown USA with a college probably has a rape problem.
Under the Banner of Heaven. I think Mormons were the only ones with an issue since they weren’t painted in a flattering light.
Anyhoo, for you “Eiger Dreams” fans, check out “Classic Krakauer”, a collection of some older stuff published in mags but never made into a book. Freaking awesome!
RIP Ueli.
The earth, like the sun, like the air, belongs to everyone - and to no one. - Edward Abbey
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JChitwood
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by JChitwood »

I just finished Missoula and can’t recommend it. Typical left wing whining. Other than the case in which the rapist admitted guilt, nobody knows who was guilty and innocent and the courts sorted it out. For the most part I greatly enjoy Krakauer’s books. Loved Into Thin Air, Into the Wild, and Eiger Dreams. Under the Banner of Heaven is my favorite I’ve read it four times. The Mormons have a fascinating history and do some crazy crap. That they continue to dupe millions in this day and age is something else.
"I'll make it." - Jimmy Chitwood
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by docjohn »

Scrambles Amongst the Alps, Edward Whymper
Travels Amongst the Great Andes of the Equator, Edward Whymper
Everest: the West Ridge, Hornbein
The Hall of the Mountain King, Snyder,
and of course:
The Ascent of Rum Doodle, W. E. Bowman,
...let me remind you of the pilgrim who asked for an audience with the Dalai Lama.
He was told he must first spend five years in contemplation. After the five years, he was ushered into the Dalai Lama's presence, who said, 'Well, my son, what do you wish to know?' So the pilgrim said, 'I wish to know the meaning of life, father.'
And the Dalai Lama smiled and said, 'Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?'

procol harum
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yardman
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by yardman »

"Touching the Void" and "This Game of Ghosts," both by Joe Simpson.
GK83
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by GK83 »

Beyond the Mountain by Steve House, well-written account of both high-level alpinism and the effects that has on a person's psyche...
Conquistadors of the Useless by Lionel Terray, completely mind-blowing if you have spent any time in Patagonia...
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Justin9
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by Justin9 »

greenonion wrote: Sun Jan 24, 2021 1:44 pm
highpilgrim wrote: Sun Jan 24, 2021 1:32 pm
CoHi591 wrote: Sun Jan 24, 2021 6:29 am "I didn't want to climb the Eiger, I only wanted to have climbed it"
It’s funny how dangerous and risky the Eiger has been historically and took days to climb as well. And now the current speed record last I looked is about 2 1/3 hours! Amazing how far climbers have progressed.

RIP Ueli.

I still can’t believe he’s gone.
Uli is missed for sure but he was a huge risk taker. Alex Honnold even commented on how he was about risk when they climbed in Yosemite and Alex is considered by many to be over the top. Regardless, Uli's book, My Life in Climbing, is excellent. His solo of the South face of Annapurna is as nutty as it gets IMHO.
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by seano »

Justin9 wrote: Tue Feb 02, 2021 11:48 am
greenonion wrote: Sun Jan 24, 2021 1:44 pm
highpilgrim wrote: Sun Jan 24, 2021 1:32 pm

It’s funny how dangerous and risky the Eiger has been historically and took days to climb as well. And now the current speed record last I looked is about 2 1/3 hours! Amazing how far climbers have progressed.

RIP Ueli.

I still can’t believe he’s gone.
Uli is missed for sure but he was a huge risk taker. Alex Honnold even commented on how he was about risk when they climbed in Yosemite and Alex is considered by many to be over the top. Regardless, Uli's book, My Life in Climbing, is excellent. His solo of the South face of Annapurna is as nutty as it gets IMHO.
Another vote for My Life in Climbing, though it is not stylish and "literary" like so much of the climbing literature. Ueli Steck was inspiring not just for his skill, but for his honesty about and clear-eyed acceptance of risk.
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Furthermore
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by Furthermore »

Maybe I missed it and someone mentioned it, but the second half of "The Ogre" by Doug Scott is outstanding. The first half is interesting if you're into Himalayan history which I could personally take a pass on.
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jonathanSKIS
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by jonathanSKIS »

yardman wrote: Mon Feb 01, 2021 12:23 pm "Touching the Void" and "This Game of Ghosts," both by Joe Simpson.
Agree with the first book, Touching the Void is a classic!
“Getting to the top is optional. Getting down is mandatory.” – Ed Viesturs.
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coopereitel
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by coopereitel »

+1 for Annapurna by Herzog
boucry
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Re: What's your favorite mountaineering books?

Post by boucry »

Currently reading Mountains of My Life by Bonatti

My top three that I've read thus far:

1. Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage - Buhl
2. Mountain of my Fear - Roberts
3. Everest: The West Ridge - Hornbein

Special mention: Nanda Devi: The Tragic Expedition - Roskelley

Hopper:
Annapurna - Herzog
The White Spider - Harrer
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