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Any good book recommendations for beginners?

FAQ and threads for those just starting to hike the Colorado 14ers.
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Postby lurker » Wed Mar 14, 2007 3:15 pm

the other book posts are all great, I would add this one from CMC press:

Colorado Summit Hikes for Everyone.
quite a few nice family hikes, some are off the beaten path of the hordes.

and Roach has one for the lost creek wilderness.
Colorado's Lost Creek Wilderness: Classic Summit Hikes

cut from amazon's page:
Only 40 miles southwest of Denver and 48 miles northwest of Colorado Springs, the Lost Creek Wilderness area offers some of the state's most breathtaking networks of box canyons, crooked creeks, twisting trails, rock towers, arches, and 150 mountain peaks.
The Mountains are Calling, and I must Go.
--John Muir

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Postby TalusMonkey » Wed Mar 14, 2007 3:46 pm

I second lurker1's endorsement of "Colorado Summit Hikes for Everyone." It's published by the Colorado Mountain Club and is full color on high quality glossy paper. Colored maps, elevation profiles, summit GPS coordinates. Includes hikes from 6,000' to 14,000' but includes only ONE 14er. Most of the hikes are 10-13k.

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If you are looking for easier hikes even closer to Denver, this book is great:

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"When hiking in bear country one doesn't need to be the fastest runner in the party - just not the slowest."

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Topo maps

Postby Ski4Fun » Tue Apr 03, 2007 6:21 pm

Okay.. so after reading a ton of stuff on this website I must say that it's become one of my favorite sites. Mr. Middlebrook has put together a wonderful tool for everyone to use.

Now... on to my question.. I've done some hiking here in Illinois but I've never had to use a topo map. Is there somewhere or something that I could read to learn how to use a topo map and understand the details on the map? I understand that it shows the contour of the land but I'm not sure if I could figure out how to read it out on the trail. Any suggestions?
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Re: Topo maps

Postby mtnmaniac » Tue Apr 03, 2007 10:41 pm

Ski4Fun wrote:Okay.. so after reading a ton of stuff on this website I must say that it's become one of my favorite sites. Mr. Middlebrook has put together a wonderful tool for everyone to use.

Now... on to my question.. I've done some hiking here in Illinois but I've never had to use a topo map. Is there somewhere or something that I could read to learn how to use a topo map and understand the details on the map? I understand that it shows the contour of the land but I'm not sure if I could figure out how to read it out on the trail. Any suggestions?


I bet if you googled "how to read topographic maps" you'd get some pretty helpful quick answers. That google guy is one smart SOB. The longer way would be to look into a cartography 101 book. I can't remember what outdoor stores Illinois may have other that active endeavors and scheels- rei is only in chicago, but most stores usually will hold courses also.
Are you hurt.... or injured?

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Postby hikerguy0 » Wed Apr 11, 2007 6:59 pm

Freedom of the Hills, 7th Ed, has a pretty good section on Land Navigation. It's a bit pricey, but it will tell you a LOT about mountaineering.

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Postby Aubrey » Wed Apr 11, 2007 7:31 pm

I was going to make some suggestions but people are pretty damn quick on here. Thaar, you have plenty to research now ... all very good advice, which seems to be common around here.

Thinking of Englewood's location, I was going to say Roxborough State Park (if I spelled that right) and Lost Creek Wilderness. But I'd also second the peaks just west of Boulder. Do Sanitas, Green Mountain ... and work up to Bear Peak and/or South Boulder Peak (both about 8-1/2k and steep quad/knee burners). If you're fine on those, I'd move up to Rocky Mountain National Park and take some hikes from Bear Lake (like Loch Vale, for example) and then maybe on to Flattop Mountain. If you're still OK, look at some 14ers: Bierstadt, Grays/Torreys, Quandary, Sherman ...

Glad you're taking advantage of heaven in your back yard. Cheers

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