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Where's a geologist when you need one?

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Re: Where's a geologist when you need one?

Postby Porkrind » Tue Feb 26, 2013 2:48 pm

However, all this occurred during the worldwide flood (Noah) about 4,000 years ago, not the erroneously assumed "millions of years".

Using your (geologists) terms shows how massive amounts of water (i.e. flood), caused it.

"Water flowing through this fracture deposited minerals which crystallized and formed the vein."
"...precipitation of a water-transported, silica rich solution..."
"...water flowing along fractures..."
"...water flows easier along the open fractures..."
"The water picks up minerals as it flows through the rock..."

http://www.answersingenesis.org/articles/nab/catastrophic-plate-tetronics

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Re: Where's a geologist when you need one?

Postby jdorje » Tue Feb 26, 2013 2:55 pm

Geology is the study of pressure and time. That's all it takes really, pressure, and time.

Also I could be crazy but I think one of those links mentioned being surrounded by liquid hot magma. EDIT: I was crazy, and it actually refers to "hot brine".
Last edited by jdorje on Tue Feb 26, 2013 7:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Where's a geologist when you need one?

Postby Bean » Tue Feb 26, 2013 2:56 pm

Porkrind wrote:However, all this occurred during the worldwide flood (Noah) about 4,000 years ago, not the erroneously assumed "millions of years".

Using your (geologists) terms shows how massive amounts of water (i.e. flood), caused it.

"Water flowing through this fracture deposited minerals which crystallized and formed the vein."
"...precipitation of a water-transported, silica rich solution..."
"...water flowing along fractures..."
"...water flows easier along the open fractures..."
"The water picks up minerals as it flows through the rock..."

http://www.answersingenesis.org/articles/nab/catastrophic-plate-tetronics

=D>
gdthomas wrote:Bean, you're an idiot.

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Re: Where's a geologist when you need one?

Postby aaronmojica » Tue Feb 26, 2013 3:22 pm

rockeyes1.jpg
rockeyes1.jpg (45.47 KiB) Viewed 314 times

Are the geo super sleuths ready for another?
Taken a few miles east of Trinidad, CO while scouting virgin bouldering

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Re: Where's a geologist when you need one?

Postby Monster5 » Tue Feb 26, 2013 3:26 pm

Expert here.

Can confirm - it was a flood. The Navajo sandstone was deposited 5000 years ago. It lithified after a giant (felled by a rock) collapsed on it. The impact as the giant fell caused the fracturing. The flood filled up the fractures with calcium derived from a sudden abundance of animal bones.

Aaron - that is called a concretion. I'll let wikipedia do the explaining.
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Re: Where's a geologist when you need one?

Postby Mark A Steiner » Tue Feb 26, 2013 4:28 pm

Porkrind wrote:However, all this occurred during the worldwide flood (Noah) about 4,000 years ago, not the erroneously assumed "millions of years".

Using your (geologists) terms shows how massive amounts of water (i.e. flood), caused it.

"Water flowing through this fracture deposited minerals which crystallized and formed the vein."
"...precipitation of a water-transported, silica rich solution..."
"...water flowing along fractures..."
"...water flows easier along the open fractures..."
"The water picks up minerals as it flows through the rock..."

http://www.answersingenesis.org/articles/nab/catastrophic-plate-tetronics

For the Navajo Sandstone, a major problem with traditional geologic interpretation is that the dunes were deposited in aeolian, rather that fluvial conditions. Examination of sand grain cementing agents common in this formation, such as silica (quartz, mentioned above), carbonate (calcite/dolomite), sulfate (gypsum) and iron oxide (limonite and hematite) reveals water, rather that airborne deposition. Also, the remarkable on- or near-surface preservation of primary and secondary structural features, such as cross-bedding, suggests a recent, rather than ancient deposit.

An aeolian sand deposit may be viewed at Great Sand Dunes in Colorado, and clearly lack these cementing agents.
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Re: Where's a geologist when you need one?

Postby Monster5 » Tue Feb 26, 2013 5:30 pm

The cementing agents were not present during deposition. Nor do they tell us about depositional processes; rather, they tell us about later lithification and groundwater flow through numerous units. The large-scale x-sets and mineral composition of the non-cementing agents tell us about depositional environment.

The aeolian grains are simply the dry cake mix. Water, oil, and eggs are added later, along with the baking and frosting.

The Navajo Fm was buried by other sediments which were later eroded. The overlying units are evidenced in other locales. There are also components of geomorphology, changing environments, principles of superposition, lateral continuity, and so forth to consider.

After continued deposition of sediments on top of the aeolian grains, groundwater transported minerals from surrounding formations throughout the porous, high transmissivity qz sediments. Formations both above and below the Glen Canyon group are fluvial, lacustrine, and marine and vary in ability to transmit mineral-laden water.

Sedimentary structures are not particularly "preserved." "Exposed" might be a better word as over-lying sections of the unit have been eroded away.

Colorado's sand dunes may in time look like this, such as the petrified dunes in NE CO or like the beach dune Fox Hills Fm closer to Denver. Cover them up, subject them to pressure, and geochemical alteration with groundwater, and bam. Future liquefaction hazard created.



Mark A Steiner wrote:For the Navajo Sandstone, a major problem with traditional geologic interpretation is that the dunes were deposited in aeolian, rather that fluvial conditions. Examination of sand grain cementing agents common in this formation, such as silica (quartz, mentioned above), carbonate (calcite/dolomite), sulfate (gypsum) and iron oxide (limonite and hematite) reveals water, rather that airborne deposition. Also, the remarkable on- or near-surface preservation of primary and secondary structural features, such as cross-bedding, suggests a recent, rather than ancient deposit.

An aeolian sand deposit may be viewed at Great Sand Dunes in Colorado, and clearly lack these cementing agents.
"Mountains are the means, the man is the end. The goal is not to reach the tops of mountains, but to improve the man." - Walter Bonatti

Re: Where's a geologist when you need one?

Postby mtnfiend » Tue Feb 26, 2013 7:30 pm

Good discussion, thanks everone. I knew there was a reasonable explanation!
Didn't I ever tell you.....Bumble's bounce!!!

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