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WFR in Denver

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WFR in Denver

Postby mtn_nut » Tue Feb 12, 2013 10:23 pm

Does anyone know of a Wilderness First Responder course in Denver that would work with someone like me that can't take any time off work, like an evenings during the week or weekend only classes?

thanks

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Re: WFR in Denver

Postby climbingaggie03 » Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:31 pm

Unfortunately that's not really the way the WFR course is designed. The closest thing I could find is WMA offers a 5 day WFR, you have to do alot of work before the course, and then the course is mostly skills, I think. You might find an EMT class that is evenings and weekends, it's fairly comparable material to a WFR course and it's a much more in depth and thorough course. Why are you interested in the course? would a WFA course suit your needs? they're usually only a few days long.

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Re: WFR in Denver

Postby mtn_nut » Wed Feb 13, 2013 12:55 am

Mostly to feel a bit more competent while in the backcountry. I currently have a CPR/First aid certification that's similar to the WFA, and i don't think i would gain much from a wilderness first aid class with my experience.

it looks like most of the WMA 5 day courses are during the week, which defeats the point of doing it in 5 days IMO since i would still need to take 5 vacation days to complete the course.

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Re: WFR in Denver

Postby DaveLanders » Wed Feb 13, 2013 2:27 pm

You might check the community college course listings. I was able to take a WFR course
many years ago that met in the evenings at FRCC in Ft Collins. It was part of their EMT
curriculum, but I was able to take the class without any pre-requisites.

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Re: WFR in Denver

Postby B-Dog » Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:21 pm

http://wildernessmedicine.com/

Tues/Thurs 6-10 for 6 weeks plus 3 weekend days
$650

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Re: WFR in Denver

Postby schrund » Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:45 pm

B-Dog is right, Wilderness Medicine Outfitters does the curriculum twice a year on evenings and a few weekend days. Carl Weil is the course director and he already started his Boulder course (Tuesday & Thursday evenings) but is starting another on Mon & Wed nights for 6 weeks in Golden starting the week of 3/11. I've done his course twice and am currently expired so I am considering the Golden class.
We did not think of the great open plains, the beautiful rolling hills, and winding streams... as "wild". Only to the white man was nature a "wilderness".
-Luther Standing Bear, Oglala Chief

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Re: WFR in Denver

Postby mtn_nut » Wed Feb 13, 2013 11:16 pm

that wilderness medicine outfitter course would probably work.

i also found this one this morning. does any have any experience with http://www.coloradowildernessfirstresponder.com/ and its director Cory Morrison? I emailed him and he said he will be offering a summer course from the start of june through august. at $400, i feel likes its a pretty good deal, and one evening a week will be more than manageable with my work schedule

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Re: WFR in Denver

Postby MountainMedic » Thu Feb 14, 2013 12:04 am

What's your end goal? Just to feel safer while outdoors? I am neither WFR nor WEMT certified, but have worked with both and must say I am consistently much for impressed with WEMTs. The WFR curriculum is extremely rudimentary; a good WEMT program will teach you some of the finer points of wilderness medicine beyond basic patient assessment and bandaging/splinting. Both WFR and WEMT are fairly serious time commitments, to the point where you're best taking a vacation week or two and taking a course. NOLS and RMI (Remote Medical International) both have excellent reputations and teach classes all over the place.

Below is a description of wilderness medical courses found in the Wilderness Medical Society's quarterly magazine, summer 2012 (found on their site, wms.org).

Answers to your questions concerning wilderness medicine course curriculums: what is appropriate for your level of training, institutions that provide the training and where to take the course. Certification, in most courses, only “confirms” you took the course and does not imply expertise or licensing. The courses listed below represent only a few of the many available programs.
Wilderness First Responder (WFR): This is a course geared to non-medical professionals and designed to meet the needs of wilderness guides, expedition leaders, and outdoor instructors. The course, taught over nine days, includes certification in adult & child CPR and AED. wildmedcenter.com/wilderness-first-responder.html remotemedicine.ie/WEFR.html
Advanced Wilderness First Aid/Essential Wilderness First Aid (AWFA/EWFA): These certification courses are offered as a 90-hour or 50-hour course designed for non-medical professionals such as outdoor educators, guides or trip leaders. They cover the basics wildernessfirstaid.ca
Wilderness Emergency Medical Technician (W-EMT): This certification course is aimed at licensed EMTs, either basic, intermediate, or paramedic with patient care experience. Other licensed health professional can attend and receive a completion card in lieu of a certificate. wildernessmedicine.com
Advanced Wilderness Life Support/Wilderness Advanced Life Support (WALS/AWLS): This is a
certification course appropriate for MD, PhD, PA, NP, RN, Paramedic, EMT or medical professionals in training who have an interest in wilderness medicine. CME credits are achieved and certification lasts four years. awls.org
Fellow of the Academy of Wilderness Medicine
(FAWM): This is a fellowship program offered by the WMS Academy of Wilderness Medicine to all levels of wilderness professionals. Members of the WMS may complete the FAWM curriculum by accumulating a minimum of 100 total credits from required and elective topics. wms.org/fawm
Masters Fellow Degree: The Master’s Fellow degree program is an advanced, post-FAWM certification offered by WMS and created to denote individuals who have completed an advanced program in a specific sub-discipline of wilderness medicine. wms.org/fawm/ masters.asp
Diploma in Mountain Medicine (DiMM): This is an internationally recognized course certifying that the participant has undergone rigorous wilderness medicine training and testing. Designed as continuing wilderness education for doctors, nurses, and paramedics who work in or aspire to work in austere mountain environments. WMS is partnering with the University of Utah and University of Colorado to introduce this advanced program in the USA. wms.org/education/dimm.


If 80 hrs for WFR or 150+ for WEMT sounds like too much, take a look at these books:

JA Wilkerson, Medicine for Mountaineering and other wilderness activities 5th Ed. A good go-to WEMT book. If you're smart and motivated, you can get a ton out of this book and perhaps forego the $600 WFR cost.

Paul Auerbach, Wilderness Medicine 6th Ed. Written for doctors/medics/nurses, but accessible to laymen. 2000 page bible of wilderness medicine; it's my New Years' resolution to read 10 pages/day. I would only recommend this if you find wilderness medicine fascinating, otherwise your eyes will glaze over.

Hope this is helpful.

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Re: WFR in Denver

Postby MountainMedic » Thu Feb 14, 2013 1:12 am

Another way I could offer some help: PM me if you want some of my notes from various classes/readings. They're generally paramedic to MD-level, but should be helpful. Here's what I think might be most helpful to a CO hiker/climber:

High Altitude Physiology and Medicine (not done yet)
Hypothermia and Cold Injury
Heat Illness and Injury
Orthopedics
Wound Management

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