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Winter Hydration

Info on gear, conditioning, and preparation for hiking/climbing. Gear Classifieds
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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby ThuChad » Thu Dec 13, 2012 6:32 am

Haven't seen anyone mention anything like this for bladders. Just wear it as a base layer and blow the water back in or wear a small hydration pack under your coat. It's worked several times for me in harsh skiing weather down to single digits. Never tried it hiking. That one time you forget to blow it back in kinda ruins your day though.

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby B-Dog » Thu Dec 13, 2012 7:51 am

My bladder gets put away in the fall and broken back out in the spring. Even then, I don't use mine much in the summer, it's hard to keep track of how much water I have left and I've run out before. The last time I used mine in the winter, the tube froze in the trunk on the drive up.

There's only so much blowing back you can do before the bladder is puffed full of air. After that, you blow in and the air pushes water out. Also, there will be a little water left in the hose after blowing. If your hose is running at a downward angle towards the mouthpiece (in or out of your shoulder strap), the leftover water droplets in the hose will trickle down to the mouthpiece and could freeze the mouthpiece shut.

No thanks, I'll stick with fumbling around the nalgene bottles.

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby Presto » Thu Dec 13, 2012 8:34 am

by Bean » Thu Dec 13, 2012 6:21 am

Presto wrote:Bury them in the snow. The man and I discovered this by doing a test when winter camping. Beers left outside, or even in the vestibule, will freeze and foam. Beers buried in the snow were insulated and survived just fine. :iluvbeer:


That usually works though isn't foolproof; one time I had a 6-pack freeze up pretty bad despite being buried in a snowbank.


I would wager a guess that you did not have "highly alcoholic" beer in that 6-pak. :wink: I think that makes a difference. Coors Light is certainly going to freeze easier. :-#
As if none of us have ever come back with a cool, quasi-epic story instead of being victim to tragic rockfall, a fatal stumble, a heart attack, an embolism, a lightning strike, a bear attack, collapsing cornice, some psycho with an axe, a falling tree, carbon monoxide, even falling asleep at the wheel getting to a mountain. If you can't accept the fact that sometimes "s**t happens", then you live with the illusion that your epic genius and profound wilderness intelligence has put you in total and complete control of yourself, your partners, and the mountain. How mystified you'll be when "s**t happens" to you! - FM

Re: Winter Hydration

Postby Bean » Thu Dec 13, 2012 9:24 am

Presto wrote:
by Bean » Thu Dec 13, 2012 6:21 am

Presto wrote:Bury them in the snow. The man and I discovered this by doing a test when winter camping. Beers left outside, or even in the vestibule, will freeze and foam. Beers buried in the snow were insulated and survived just fine. :iluvbeer:


That usually works though isn't foolproof; one time I had a 6-pack freeze up pretty bad despite being buried in a snowbank.


I would wager a guess that you did not have "highly alcoholic" beer in that 6-pak. :wink: I think that makes a difference. Coors Light is certainly going to freeze easier. :-#


5.8% if I'm correctly remembering the beer.
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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby Presto » Thu Dec 13, 2012 9:35 am

by Bean » Thu Dec 13, 2012 10:24 am

5.8% if I'm correctly remembering the beer.


Ours was 8% (Old Chub) ... could play in to it. I'm no "beer scientist" though. :lol:
As if none of us have ever come back with a cool, quasi-epic story instead of being victim to tragic rockfall, a fatal stumble, a heart attack, an embolism, a lightning strike, a bear attack, collapsing cornice, some psycho with an axe, a falling tree, carbon monoxide, even falling asleep at the wheel getting to a mountain. If you can't accept the fact that sometimes "s**t happens", then you live with the illusion that your epic genius and profound wilderness intelligence has put you in total and complete control of yourself, your partners, and the mountain. How mystified you'll be when "s**t happens" to you! - FM

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby herdbull » Thu Dec 13, 2012 5:47 pm

pills2619 wrote:at 18,500 he might pass out...


THIS!! :lol:

I'd much rather drop a bottle than take a 2500' slide to the rocks. Lanyards are your friend on a climb like this. Heck, I'm even planning on lanyarding my contacts in :-D

I can see the headlines now.....

"Man gets light headed from blowing his water back into his bladder and slides 2000' to his death. Good news though, the rescue time sent to retrieve his body were able to drink his water that had melted while he lay on the rocks absorbing the warm sunshine" #-o

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby MuchosPixels » Fri Dec 14, 2012 7:01 am

I used a camelback bladder inside my pack with a neophrene sleeve for the hose on a late march hike up pikes peak. It was not that cold (20's) but was extremely windy. There wasnt even the slightest hint of the water freezing. It worked great for hours and hours.

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby Dex » Fri Dec 14, 2012 7:20 am

MuchosPixels wrote:I used a camelback bladder inside my pack with a neophrene sleeve for the hose on a late march hike up pikes peak. It was not that cold (20's) but was extremely windy. There wasnt even the slightest hint of the water freezing. It worked great for hours and hours.


I took a look at my Camelbak Alpine Explorer with a neophrene sleeve. The blatter compartment is fully enclosed, insulated and the tube comes out of a small opening in the top. I'd guess there is 12" of tube exposed from the opening to the bite valve.

Looking at my Ospray Talon 22 the bladder compartment is not insulated and the top is open.

So, I'm guessing pack design & construction has something to do with the problems some people are having.
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