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Winter Hydration

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby susanjoypaul » Wed Dec 12, 2012 3:09 pm

Mindy wrote:
susanjoypaul wrote:

packets of powdered G-2,

two cold bottles of G-2 (raspberry lemonade is pretty good)



Susan what is G-2?

It's the low calorie version of Gatorade. It has the same electrolytic value, but a loss less sugar, carbs and calories. I eat/drink very little sugar, so the "full sugar" drinks are just too sweet for me.

Re: Winter Hydration

Postby Bean » Wed Dec 12, 2012 3:52 pm

jaymz wrote:I recall someone at one point suggesting a tiny dash of vodka in your water - obviously not enough to affect your mental state, but enough to lower the freezing temp. Anyone ever try that, or was I being "punk'd"?

The amount of alcohol required to lower the freezing temp enough to make any sort of practical difference is enough to get you pretty hammered on a long day.

I ran some calculations, and (assuming I didn't screw them up somewhere) a hearty (yet still drinkable) combination of salt, sugar, and alcohol is only going to get you a couple degrees at best.
gdthomas wrote:Bean, you're an idiot.

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby SchralpTheGnar » Wed Dec 12, 2012 4:41 pm

I've noticed that the winter seasonal beers freeze when I leave them outside and it's below 20 degrees or so. After the beer thaws, it then gets really foamy, any thoughts on what to do with this, other than not leave the beer outside, wrap them in a blanket?

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby Presto » Wed Dec 12, 2012 4:51 pm

by SchralpTheGnar » Wed Dec 12, 2012 4:41 pm
I've noticed that the winter seasonal beers freeze when I leave them outside and it's below 20 degrees or so. After the beer thaws, it then gets really foamy, any thoughts on what to do with this, other than not leave the beer outside, wrap them in a blanket?


Bury them in the snow. The man and I discovered this by doing a test when winter camping. Beers left outside, or even in the vestibule, will freeze and foam. Beers buried in the snow were insulated and survived just fine.

:iluvbeer:
As if none of us have ever come back with a cool, quasi-epic story instead of being victim to tragic rockfall, a fatal stumble, a heart attack, an embolism, a lightning strike, a bear attack, collapsing cornice, some psycho with an axe, a falling tree, carbon monoxide, even falling asleep at the wheel getting to a mountain. If you can't accept the fact that sometimes "s**t happens", then you live with the illusion that your epic genius and profound wilderness intelligence has put you in total and complete control of yourself, your partners, and the mountain. How mystified you'll be when "s**t happens" to you! - FM

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby SchralpTheGnar » Wed Dec 12, 2012 5:09 pm

Presto wrote:
by SchralpTheGnar » Wed Dec 12, 2012 4:41 pm
I've noticed that the winter seasonal beers freeze when I leave them outside and it's below 20 degrees or so. After the beer thaws, it then gets really foamy, any thoughts on what to do with this, other than not leave the beer outside, wrap them in a blanket?


Bury them in the snow. The man and I discovered this by doing a test when winter camping. Beers left outside, or even in the vestibule, will freeze and foam. Beers buried in the snow were insulated and survived just fine.

:iluvbeer:



It doesn't snow any more though.

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby herdbull » Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:16 pm

Dex wrote:
herdbull wrote:
You could always blow the water back into the bladder each time emptying the tube but that seems like a big inconvenience.



Really?



Yes really. The last thing I want to be doing while standing on the side of a glacier on a 40 degree incline at 18,500' is blowing bubbles in my water bladder. That could end up not so good #-o .

Lots of good info here everyone. Even the beer in the snow replies. That's good to know as well. Looks like I need to pick up a couple more pieces of gear before the trip.

Re: Winter Hydration

Postby Mountain Ninja » Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:44 pm

Oman wrote:For long days out, I've had good luck with this thermos.
http://www.rei.com/product/811181/rei-bullet-vacuum-bottle-1-liter
A half-liter thermos is better for short (<4 hours) days.


I second this thermos, for sure! If I'm leaving from my house that morning, I fill two of these with the hottest water my tap will provide, and store 'em in my pack. And attached to my front for easy access, I use an upside-down 1L Nalgene in a water bottle insulator, to get me by the first few hours.

On 12+ hour days in the winter, my 2nd REI thermos is still holding warm water, which by that time, anything is better than cold H2O.

I bet tea or filtered water probably tastes better, but let's face it, we aren't expecting luxury & comfort in the windy winter hills. ;)
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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby smoove » Wed Dec 12, 2012 8:04 pm

herdbull wrote:
Dex wrote:
herdbull wrote:
You could always blow the water back into the bladder each time emptying the tube but that seems like a big inconvenience.



Really?



Yes really. The last thing I want to be doing while standing on the side of a glacier on a 40 degree incline at 18,500' is blowing bubbles in my water bladder. That could end up not so good #-o .

Lots of good info here everyone. Even the beer in the snow replies. That's good to know as well. Looks like I need to pick up a couple more pieces of gear before the trip.


Edit: oops, meant to quote this one.

Blowing the liquid back in is a helluva lot easier than fumbling with a Nalgene--getting it out of the insulated container, drinking out of a bottle, putting it back in there. The blowing it back in, tucking the valve under your jacket thing works well to a point. But once you're experiencing typical winter temps, it just isn't practical. If any part of that tube is exposed, it'll freeze up in that spot. I've had success unfreezing the tube by placing the whole thing between my pack and back. But that takes a while and you've gone all that time without drinking (if you didn't have a back up bottle). The tube insulators don't seem to be effective either. I carry one Nalgene with Gatorade (mixed with hot water in the morning) in an insulator hanging off my pack and keep another tucked inside my pack. It has worked perfectly so far. I think kansas mentioned drinking a liter before you start. I do that too. Works wonders.

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby Dex » Wed Dec 12, 2012 8:46 pm

herdbull wrote:
Dex wrote:
herdbull wrote:
You could always blow the water back into the bladder each time emptying the tube but that seems like a big inconvenience.



Really?



Yes really. The last thing I want to be doing while standing on the side of a glacier on a 40 degree incline at 18,500' is blowing bubbles in my water bladder. That could end up not so good #-o .



OK, I'm willing to learn. How is the above "could end up not so good"

be better than:

fumbling with a Nalgene-out of you pack, getting it out of the insulated container, drinking out of a bottle, putting it back in there - as smoove above mentions - while standing on the side of a glacier on a 40 degree incline at 18,500'?
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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby pills2619 » Wed Dec 12, 2012 11:24 pm

at 18,500 he might pass out...
They forget that some crisis is necessary to hone skill. "Near misses," those brief encounters with the reality of mortality, are great learning tools if properly approached. -Denali Climbers Guidebook

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Re: Winter Hydration

Postby Papillon » Wed Dec 12, 2012 11:32 pm

A couple of things...

You can leave the insulated nalgene covers at home by using a $0.99 lanyard around your neck, tying it to the lid of a nalgene and tucking the bottle in your jacket. I have never had my water freeze using this method. The one liter bottle can be a bit bulky under your coat, however, and any photos taken of you will make it seem like you are hitting more buffets than mountains (which may or may not be the case).

I downsized to a 0.5 liter bottle and carry an extra liter (gatorade bottle) wrapped in a layer in my pack. I've never had it freeze. My partner will carry a liter and we'll share the bottle hanging from my neck and refill as needed. I just don't drink as much in winter and make sure I get a liter down before I leave the car.

Those using bladders/dromedaries with a pack that has that air gap separating your back from your pack (Deuter and Osprey are examples) may have problems in addition to a frozen hose and mouthpiece. Wind gets into that gap very easily and the bladder is stored right there with hardly any protection. I recommend wrapping the water reservoir in your pack with some kind of insulation. My partner ended up with ice cubes in there and that was the last time we used those.

There are a ton of gadgets out there but nothing beats good old fashioned body heat.

I've been meaning to give the thermos a try. I think a thermos of warm tomato soup would be fantastic on a cold day.
The look in his eyes when it hit - Kid, it was tasty... - William Seward Burroughs

Re: Winter Hydration

Postby Bean » Thu Dec 13, 2012 6:21 am

Presto wrote:Bury them in the snow. The man and I discovered this by doing a test when winter camping. Beers left outside, or even in the vestibule, will freeze and foam. Beers buried in the snow were insulated and survived just fine.

:iluvbeer:


That usually works though isn't foolproof; one time I had a 6-pack freeze up pretty bad despite being buried in a snowbank.
gdthomas wrote:Bean, you're an idiot.

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