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tents

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Re: tents

Postby Papillon » Mon Dec 10, 2012 10:19 pm

I think the Hubba Hubba is too heavy. I just weighed mine "packed" and it comes in a touch under 5 lbs. Mine was purchased in '09. I think you could find the same quality of tent for 1.5 - 2 lbs less. That is huge. The Big Agnes tents mentioned earlier are on my radar for next spring.

We did eight nights in the Weminuche this past summer and I cut weight everywhere. The thought of being able to cut an additional 1-2 lbs has me salivating. One might think weight does not matter, even on a 1 or 2 nighter, but it does. Trust me.

That is a good take on Hilleberg, RoanMtnMan. I have a Nallo 3GT and am beginning to wonder if it is too beefy for my needs here in Colorado. Trial and error no doubt.

At least when I tell people my tent is nicer than my apartment, I am being truthful.
The look in his eyes when it hit - Kid, it was tasty... - William Seward Burroughs

Re: tents

Postby highplaces » Tue Dec 11, 2012 12:32 pm

I've been happy with the Big Agnes Copper Spur UL3 (for two people).

Sq footage of floor area is 44 vs. Hubba 29.

It was 13 oz more to go from 2 person to 3 person which I thought was a good use of 13oz. No regrets on that.

I couldn't be happier with the tent. We used it 2+ weekends a month for 5 months straight and loved it. Easy to setup. We did it in the middle of a hail storm in about 2 mins flat. Easy to take down. Comfy space inside (floor area and ceiling height) and 2 vestibules outside. But, it's not a 4 season tent.

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Re: tents

Postby climbingaggie03 » Tue Dec 11, 2012 12:44 pm

My newest tent is a big agnes fly creek UL2 and it's great! it's super light at just over 2 lbs and it's always kept me dry. I use it as a solo tent, it could fit 2 but it'd be cozy, I can't quite sit up straight, I have to keep my head ducked just a little bit, and the zipper on the fly is a bit fussy, it tends to get caught on the fabric of the fly. But these are all minor gripes and for the weight, I can't complain at all. It also has many guy outs so I'm pretty comfortable putting it in wind.

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Re: tents

Postby Wish I lived in CO » Tue Dec 11, 2012 2:31 pm

Interesting thread. I'm in the market for an ultralight tent for next year as well. Haven't looked very hard yet, but the Big Agnes Fly Creek impressed me at the store. Encouraging to see mostly thumbs up here also.
I look up to the mountains - does my help come from there? My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth! Psalm 121:1-2

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Re: tents

Postby ebnhils » Tue Dec 11, 2012 3:12 pm

If looking for light weigh 3 season check out tarptents.com. They claim to be able to withstand high wind and some snow and have quite a few models to choose from. I'm thinking of trying out the contrail next season. I have a mountain hardware sprite 1 and a msr fast stash I need to sell first.

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Re: tents

Postby climbingaggie03 » Tue Dec 11, 2012 7:53 pm

Wish I lived in CO wrote:Interesting thread. I'm in the market for an ultralight tent for next year as well. Haven't looked very hard yet, but the Big Agnes Fly Creek impressed me at the store. Encouraging to see mostly thumbs up here also.


definitely a thumbs up, for the weight and convenience I don't think it can be beat. I love sleeping under a tarp and usually do, but when i'm someplace I need a tent, I tend to grab my fly creek. I used it for guiding in NW Wisconsin, the boundary waters, and Isle Royale last summer and couldn't have been happier. Tarps are not an option for most of the summer in the midwest so the fly creek seemed like the obvious choice.

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Re: tents

Postby midwestcoast » Thu Dec 27, 2012 11:37 pm

If you normally carry trekking poles, I have the Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo and love it. I've only had it out 4 nights so far but I had no problems in the Cloud Peak Wilderness with pretty strong winds and about 6 inches of snow overnight. It also withstood a pretty brutal thunderstorm out on the open plains at Badlands NP. 23 ounces and it's roomier than you'd expect.

I've also had an REI quarter dome T2 for about 5 years and was surprised by the comments that it's hard to set-up, even at first. Mine's older but its seems to look pretty much the same as the newer version and I don't remember it ever being difficult to figure out, it's also held up pretty good through the years.

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Re: tents

Postby climbingaggie03 » Fri Dec 28, 2012 2:11 am

I know this doesn't really go with the OP's original question but honestly, I think that you can use a tarp almost year round here in CO. I love my integral designs sil tarp 2. It's 14 ounces (roughly) and it's an 8'x10' tarp. It does take more thought in set up than a tent does, but it also gives tons more flexibility, because you have so many more options on how to set it up. I've been in several snow and rain storms with it and stayed perfectly warm and dry. You can pitch it with trees, or out in the open with trekking poles. You can pitch an A frame (high above the ground in good weather or low to the ground in rough weather. You can pitch a lean-to, flat topped shelter, or several other options. You can also pitch it above a hammock if you want. I've slept 4 under it in a lean-to type shelter in light rain, and I've spent many nights under it solo as an A-frame (including a 16 day backpacking trip in SE oregon in june) I've had nights with 4 inches of snow falling and it held up just fine, maybe a bit better than a tent cause I had no worries cooking under it, and I could very easilly tell when it was getting snow loaded and clear it.

sil tarp a frame.jpg
here's a pic of the a frame
sil tarp a frame.jpg (68.32 KiB) Viewed 342 times


lean to.jpg
this is a lean to I pitched, it's actually with 2 sil tarp 2's we slept 11 people under this shelter
lean to.jpg (79.97 KiB) Viewed 342 times

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Re: tents

Postby RoanMtnMan » Fri Dec 28, 2012 11:21 am

climbingaggie03 wrote:I know this doesn't really go with the OP's original question but honestly, I think that you can use a tarp almost year round here in CO. I love my integral designs sil tarp 2. It's 14 ounces (roughly) and it's an 8'x10' tarp. It does take more thought in set up than a tent does, but it also gives tons more flexibility, because you have so many more options on how to set it up. I've been in several snow and rain storms with it and stayed perfectly warm and dry. You can pitch it with trees, or out in the open with trekking poles. You can pitch an A frame (high above the ground in good weather or low to the ground in rough weather. You can pitch a lean-to, flat topped shelter, or several other options. You can also pitch it above a hammock if you want. I've slept 4 under it in a lean-to type shelter in light rain, and I've spent many nights under it solo as an A-frame (including a 16 day backpacking trip in SE oregon in june) I've had nights with 4 inches of snow falling and it held up just fine, maybe a bit better than a tent cause I had no worries cooking under it, and I could very easilly tell when it was getting snow loaded and clear it.

sil tarp a frame.jpg


lean to.jpg


I like your style. I am also a proponents of the tarp and the hammock in CO for about 5 months a year. However even the thinnest walls sure are nice in blowing snow. It's a lighter setup but not more flexible. Hammocks and tarps often confound me above tree line. If you are at 12k, with 3 inches of snow on the ground, in a 40mph wind, and need to camp, the tarp system is going to be daunting. Overall though, a good tarp setup saves a lot of weight and money without sacrificing comfort in the CO summer environment.

Your comment "It does take more thought in set up than a tent does" is an important one. Just back in September I climbed under my tarp during a hunting trip for some sleep, only to awaken at 1am in a pool of freezing rain and snow draining under me. I should have dug a moat. The issue was bad tarp placement, the result was a desperate night of attempted sleep. My partners in the tent ended up well rested.
Always follow the 7 P's. Proper Planning & Preparation, Prevents Piss-Poor Performance.

"An adventure is misery and discomfort, relived in the safety of reminiscence.” --Marco Polo

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Re: tents

Postby pills2619 » Fri Dec 28, 2012 4:08 pm

Has anyone used the Nemo Tenshi. It looks like one of the lightest 4-season 2 person tents out there that also offers all the creature comforts like vents and vestibules and is also very flexible so you can drop the vestibule and the condensation divider if you would like to save even more weight. I'm thinking this would be a perfect tent for harsh Colorado weather as well as Rainier or Denali. I also have a 50% pro motive discount so that makes this a very attractive option.
They forget that some crisis is necessary to hone skill. "Near misses," those brief encounters with the reality of mortality, are great learning tools if properly approached. -Denali Climbers Guidebook

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Re: tents

Postby seano732 » Fri Dec 28, 2012 5:28 pm

Hey pills- I just picked up the Nemo moki off pro motive. 3p, 4 season. It's more of a base camp type model, but I already have a single wall wedge... We're trying it out this weekend in the Sawatch, so I'll let you know, but my initial impressions are its very well made. I know several peeps with Nemo tents, and they all rave about them, which is one of the reasons I went with them.... It took eight days from the time I ordered from pro motive to get to my door. Peace! :-D

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Re: tents

Postby pills2619 » Sat Dec 29, 2012 12:38 am

Sweet, looking forward to see how it goes. I like that its 7 pounds fully packed and then if you drop the vestibule and the condensation divider its down to 4lbs 3oz. I think that pretty light for a 4 season 2 person tent.
They forget that some crisis is necessary to hone skill. "Near misses," those brief encounters with the reality of mortality, are great learning tools if properly approached. -Denali Climbers Guidebook

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