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Let's talk Nepal Evos

Info on gear, conditioning, and preparation for hiking/climbing. Gear Classifieds
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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby Johnson » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:04 pm

Theodore wrote:Just an FYI, there's a pair in the classifieds right now. 44's, $270.



That is a great deal man! :YY
In his hand are the depths of the earth; the heights of the mountains are his also. - Psalm 95:4

"I would be doing myself a disservice and every member of this band if I didn't perform the hell out of this." - Gene

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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby nkan02 » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:53 pm

dswink wrote:Natalie, are your Trangos silver or red or even the yellow ones (Trango Prime)? Looking at the La Sportiva site, the silver Trango Ext Evo is $100 more than the red Trango S Evo, but it has the same insulation as the Nepals. I have the red Trangos which seem noticeably colder than my Nepals.

Mine are blue and silver - women's version of Trango Evo.

http://www.backcountry.com/la-sportiva-trango-s-evo-gtx-mountaineering-boot-womens?CMP_SKU=LSP0109&MER=0406&CMP_ID=SH_SHP001&mv_pc=r110&003=7163546&010=LSP0109&mr:referralID=c98be49d-2de4-11e2-b779-001b2166c62d

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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby herdbull » Tue Nov 13, 2012 6:51 pm

So after trying them on a dozen times over the last few days I decided to order another pair in size 42, the first pair are 42.5's. Even though the sale was done I signed up to be an EMS member and got them at $382 shipped to my door for free with no tax. One pair will go back as I don't need 2.

I am also looking for a similar boot but a bit of a lesser boot. Something that would take crampons but not quite as stiff as the Nepals. Don't know if I really need them but if I came across that type of boot I might try them out. Currently I have nothing to get me from my Montrail mid ankle glorified trail runner to the Nepals. I feel there's a need for a "tweener" season boot :-k

I also noticed Whitakker Mountaineering had some used boots in my size on sale. The price is awesome but who knows how beat up they are.

http://www.whittakermountaineering.com/brands/mammut/used-mens-mamook-gtx-leather-boot

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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby herdbull » Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:57 pm

UUhhgggg... #-o #-o #-o

so the size 42's showed up today and I think I'm a size 42.25 :lol:

The heel just feels a tad tight on the 42's and the 42.5's just seem all around a little big. I'm trying not to load up on socks as they will only compress over time. Is there any give in these things at all once they are broke in?

Also, how tight should these things be? Are we talking zero, zip, zilch, not even 1/32 of heel slip or foot movement? Guess I'm not quite sure how gosh darn tight these things should be. I have a tendency to wear my hikers really tight. Foot & boot are one so to speak.

Any more thoughts are appreciated as this is a kind of a big $$$$ decision. I know already, just put the damn things and go hike!!

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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby DaveSwink » Fri Nov 16, 2012 5:02 pm

My Nepals do not seem to have "broken in" by expanding any at all. That is, they still fit perfectly. This kind of boot will fit differently than hiking boots with flexible soles. The heel cup should fit your heel (with sock) like a second skin. There should be zero movement at the heel, without it being squeezed. Your toes should be able to wiggle freely, of course.

Edit to add: I would say either go with the smaller size that fits your heel exactly, or if it is too tight you may have to look at other boots. Fine tune the fit with different socks?

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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby pvnisher » Fri Nov 16, 2012 5:06 pm

I do not like tight boots, especially in the cold, since that restricts bloodflow.
A friend of mine cinches his boots down like he's testing the tensile strength of the laces. I generally have mine very loose around the toe, snug mid-foot, mid-around the ankle, and then lace the top few top-to bottom to allow for better shin movement going downhill. I'll admit, it's a complicated system, but when you might spend 14 hours in your boot with gaiters and crampons on, adjusting the laces on the go is out of the question. It's taken me a while to come up with the lacing system and knots.

Your feet are likely different sizes. My left foot is about a 1/2 size (more like 1/3 size) bigger than my right. That is very common. If you do a foot trace I'll bet you'll find the same true for you. Ideally I'd like a 43 for my right and a 43.5 for my left. I need to find a boot buddy with opposite feet but the same preferences!

You could try the additional tongue to adjust the size, keep in mind you might only need it on one foot.

I also like a bit of heel slip. Just a bit.

For a middle boot, try something like the Crispi Eiger GTX. They are awesome.

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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby herdbull » Sat Nov 17, 2012 6:57 am

I think I'm gonna go with the snugger 42's. All my other boots, hikers, trail runners, everything, fits that way so why would these be any other different? It's a question I finally asked meself this morning (must have been the coffee?) To me foot slippage or movement leaves you open for rubbing. I'm one of those guys that also tests the tensile strength of his laces :lol: . On more than one occasion while driving to my morning elk hunting spot my feet have almost fallen asleep because the boots were laced so tight. 5 mins down the trail and they are perfect. I've also drawn blood from pulling so darn hard on the laces.

I think I was trying to make these boots do too much. No boot of this type is going to work with a hiking sock, a heavyweight mountaineering sock or maybe even 2 medium weight socks or any combination of them. I'm a one pair of socks kind of guy and always have been. So these need to work in that scenario and that scenario only. If I feel my feet run cold in them in extreme weather than maybe I'll have to look into an overboot or another pair of mountaineering boots with more insulation (yay more gear!).

There still room in the toe box to wiggle my toes and from what I can tell by imitating toe kicking (inside the house) or utilizing the toe area for climbing, my toes don't mash to the front of the boot. Could I make the larger size work? Absolutely but I think I may have to wear a light and heavy pair of socks, which would be warmer and leave more room for sock compression. While it may only be small, say 1/4 of a size, anything would be too much.

Man I hate being overally anal about gear, especially footwear. For whatever reason my ankles seem to be somewhat smaller too so the extenders help keep that part of the boot snug. I've noticed before on certain boots.

Pvnisher, those Crispi's look like a nice tweener boot. And if I ever see you on the trail don't be surprised if I point over to the mtn range next to us and ask you "do you see that?" and then quickly reach down and tie your boots tight :-"

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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby Johnson » Sat Nov 17, 2012 8:43 am

Herdbull:

Here is fitting recommendation from Scarpa:

General fitting rules depend on the product's intended use... follow the appropriate guidelines below for best results.

TRAIL/MOUNTAIN/APPROACH/LIFESTYLE PRODUCTS:
The bigger/heavier/more supportive the product, the more you may want to upsize .5 - 1full size. Lighter, softer, more supple shoes can be sized closer to your measured size.
Note: SCARPA Plastic mountain boots all use UK sizing; UK converts easily: 1 full size smaller than US men's size, 2 sizes smaller than US women's size.
Try on with appropriate socks for your usage. The bigger the boot, the more appropriate a bigger sock (sounds crazy, huh?)
If you use orthotics or already have aftermarket footbeds, measure against the standard footbed in boot. Fit into boot for sizing/fitting the boot.
Best to try on at the end of the day when your feet are larger/swollen, than when your feet are fresh to ensure good fit after a long day.
Lacing can play an incredibly important part of a good fit. Be sure to play with lacing when analyzing fit.
Make sure your heel isn't slipping.
Make sure your toes aren't hitting the end.
**Approach shoes may be sized smaller for performance purposes but beware... small shoes are really uncomfortable on the trail.
In his hand are the depths of the earth; the heights of the mountains are his also. - Psalm 95:4

"I would be doing myself a disservice and every member of this band if I didn't perform the hell out of this." - Gene

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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby SolarAlex » Sat Nov 17, 2012 9:04 am

I bought evos last year w my dividend at rei, but since i didnt buy until may i didnt really get a chance to test them other than cramponing around abasin...my left foot went a little numb but that was the tongue extender in there...without it, its ok....i suspect that the fit is incorrect but i plan on going over to neptune to ask them what they think. the rei guy didnt really seem to know much about mountaineering boots. Its great in the heel and toe box, just a little tight right before my toes. does that stretch out a little after wearing them more?

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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby Johnson » Sat Nov 17, 2012 9:37 am

SolarAlex wrote: does that stretch out a little after wearing them more?


It is my understanding that he rubber rand prohibits the boot from "breaking in" in the fashion that a regular leather boot would. When I talked to Neptune about this issue last year, they said they could cut the rubber off at the sides to allow the leather underneath to stretch. That, however, would void the warranty on the boot.
In his hand are the depths of the earth; the heights of the mountains are his also. - Psalm 95:4

"I would be doing myself a disservice and every member of this band if I didn't perform the hell out of this." - Gene

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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby TomPierce » Sat Nov 17, 2012 10:00 am

Herdbull: As always, purely my opinions: You might (?) want to reconsider your choice of boots, this is starting to sound like you're forcing a fit. La Sportiva makes great boots, but they are well know in the climbing community for having a fairly narrow fit, ie they fit a low volume foot best. But if I'm wrong on the fit, also consider how you want to use these boots. These are pretty much a fall/early spring boot, and for many whose feet run warm, a full-on winter boot. In other words, a boot where you want enough volume to fit a winter sock and enough room to allow your toes to wiggle. In my opinion a snug fit on a Nepal boot is almost an oxymoron, sort of like saying you want a super loose fit on a pair of rock climbing shoes. Of course I could be wrong, but these are pricey boots and you sure want a good fit, otherwise they could lead to misery. Good luck!
-Tom

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Re: Let's talk Nepal Evos

Postby herdbull » Sat Nov 17, 2012 12:19 pm

Thanks everyone and no, I'm definitely not trying to "force the fit". I'm just looking for input from people that have these and how they fit or how the boots fit them. I have nowhere else to go for this. Living in Wisconsin I am so limited to what's available.

I made the trek to the nearest REI late this summer. $40 in gas later I left shaking my head. I pretty much had a better and bigger selection of footwear in my gear room. It was pretty sad to say the least. They had a lot of stuff I wouldn't even wear to the grocery store. Just wasn't what I expected. Sure, they can order them but so can everyone else and charge you full price plus tax plus the $40 in gas to get there. Then what? Take home 2 different sizes only to have to drive back again ($40) to return them. Will they order 3-4 pairs of 42's, 42.5's and maybe 43's so I can choose the best pair. Nope, so I might as well do it myself.

These boots will be matched up with one pair of socks and that's it. And with those being a heavyweight mountaineering sock I'll be pretty good through most winter conditions. My feet run hot, really hot. Took me over 10 years of experimenting and trying different things while sitting all day for deer hunting to figure this out. I can get away with a lot less insulation in cold winter temps than most people. Don't know why, so I just gave up trying to beat it and joined it.

The 42.5's are all but boxed up and ready to go back. I'm out cutting and splitting wood all day here and I want to try them on after a full days worth of work and see if I get "ahhhhhhh, just like heaven" feeling one more time when I put them on.

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