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Cold hands and physiology

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Re: Cold hands and physiology

Postby rocky » Sun Oct 21, 2012 1:59 pm

Here's a link to info about improving your circulation by including cayenne pepper in your diet:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/216455-how-to-use-cayenne-pepper-to-improve-blood-circulation/

(please no flames about Armstrong - it's just a good source of information)

We discovered a neat little accessory years ago, but haven't seen them on the market for some time. It's a pair of little fabric (microfleece) pockets which velcro around your wrists. You put a handwarmer into the pocket and strap it on with the heat against the veins and arteries in your wrist. The blood is warmed as it goes into your hands and as it returns to the arms. Much easier to deal with something that isn't in your way or falling out of your glove.

Hope you find a good solution to the issue.
rocky
south fork, colorado

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Re: Cold hands and physiology

Postby jsdratm » Mon Oct 22, 2012 7:32 am

I have poor circulation in my hands as well and I've found it necessary to carry hand warmers on winter hikes. You can get a big box at REI pretty reasonably and just put one or two pouches in your pack in case you need them. On very cold days, I will put them inside of my gloves and have no problem warming up. I've also had situations where other people in my hiking party got numb hands and it helped save them from frostbite.

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Re: Cold hands and physiology

Postby Teresa Gergen » Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:03 am

Raynaud's Syndrome is very obvious if you have it. The tips and up to the first or second joint of one or more fingers will turn completely white and corpse-like. Raynaud's feels at first tingly and numb, then painful. If you don't get it under control, the pain will go away as the fingers become frozen. As you later warm the fingers and the blood returns, it's extremely painful. You can also get Raynaud's in your toes, and less commonly on your nose and ears. Some people only have it in their fingers or their toes.

Raynaud's is best treated by taking nifedipine (generic for Procardia). There is a slow-release form as well as an "all at once" form. I've heard that one or the other works best for different people.

Handwarmers work much better in thick expedition mittens than in gloves. Little Hotties last much longer than Grabber Mycoal (sp.). They need to be shaken very well and then left in the mitten a good 5 minutes before you start hiking. I've had them last 12+ hours when used like this. They're available at Costco in a box of 40 pair for $15.

This pole does wonders for the ergonomics of the hands and wrist while hiking, if you do enough of it that standard pole grips become troublesome:
http://www.leki.com/845-wanderfreund-speed-lock.html

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Re: Cold hands and physiology

Postby Dark Helmet » Mon Oct 22, 2012 12:48 pm

I'm sitting here at my desk, it's 70F in here and my hands are like ice-cubes.


so yeah... hand-warmers in my gloves is a requisite in the winter.

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Re: Cold hands and physiology

Postby GregMiller » Mon Oct 22, 2012 12:58 pm

rocky wrote:We discovered a neat little accessory years ago, but haven't seen them on the market for some time. It's a pair of little fabric (microfleece) pockets which velcro around your wrists. You put a handwarmer into the pocket and strap it on with the heat against the veins and arteries in your wrist. The blood is warmed as it goes into your hands and as it returns to the arms. Much easier to deal with something that isn't in your way or falling out of your glove.


Just wondering, I like the sound of these, was wondering about making some myself. Did they have any sort of structure in them? Or did they stay on the inside of your wrist pretty well on their own?
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