Forum
Buying gear? Please use these links to help 14ers.com:

More info...

Other ways to help...

Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Info on gear, conditioning, and preparation for hiking/climbing. Gear Classifieds
User avatar
Posts: 120
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 7:54 pm
Location: Washington, D.C.

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby prone2jodl » Fri Apr 02, 2010 4:17 pm

Dancesatmoonrise wrote:
But then, we're very fortunate to have a free site, and without any obnoxious advertising! =D>
(Thanks Bill!)


+1 on that...

In case you, or anyone else, wants to read the article I'm talking about, I tracked it down. You can read it here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/30/business/media/30photogs.html?src=me&ref=business
Stünd ich, Natur, vor dir ein Mann allein,
Da wär's der Mühe wert, ein Mensch zu sein.

Posts: 647
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 9:09 am

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby kimo » Sat Apr 03, 2010 8:41 am

Interesting article. I know a couple people who made money off their photographs. They did wedding photography for a few years. They were hobbyists with just a few years experience between them. They advertised on Craigslist and some wedding photographer site. They charged less than the average photographer. But they had talent and took great pictures. They paid for all of their camera gear after a handful of weddings. And then they stopped because of the hassle and time involved.

I watermarked my images for a few months. I don't own a good watermark tool, so I'd open each image in PSE, paste the watermark on to the image, and then resave as JPEG. And then I got lazy and quit doing it. I started adding the watermark because a few of my 4-wheeling images were shown on other websites (commercial and public) without my knowledge or consent.

I took the following photo with my D40 on Moab Rim Trail in 2008. I resized it to 1200 x 900 and posted to the Jeep Club forum. I did not watermark it prior. The image then "exploded" across many forums. There was some talk about making a poster. When I was given credit, I received requests asking for the hi-res version of the photograph. Eventually, I contacted re-posters and removed as many of the originals that I could.

Image

I see an opportunity to sell photographs to visitors on Maui. I was tasting wines at the Ulupalakua winery and found a box of photographs next to the bar. They were printed on photo rag and then matted and signed. The guy wanted only $65 each (and that's a fair price) for a nice big 11x17 print. He had photos of Silverswords, the crater, bamboo, flowers - just a nice range of vacation highlights. I'm not sure how my he sells, but the photos were good and the idea seemed grand to me. I would have bought one if I wasn't a hobbyist myself.

Now I've bought a Canon Pixma Pro9000 lab-quality printer, some good paper, and postcard backing. I'm going to test the waters in the Hawaiian postcard business.

+2, thanks for the free resource, Bill.

User avatar
Posts: 2146
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 7:47 pm
Location: Colorado Springs

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby Dancesatmoonrise » Sat Apr 03, 2010 7:37 pm

Kimo, that's a fabulous image. True merit.

I like your idea of the postcards.

I've had similar circumstances - just yesterday saw one of my images used (without notice or consent.) It's not like they're making any money off it. For a while I was putting in a (c) in the lower right corner- then, like you, got lazy and quit doing it. But I try to be careful and use lower-res images, retaining the high-res originals.

Hey, if you have any great ideas for a fun collaboration that might pay for some of this crap we own, I'm up for it. It would be fun to get one of those printers - and free up my dependence on the local photo lab for quality prints. I presume 13" is the maximum width? Still, with a reasonable mat, you can get an 18x24 frame around those prints - not shabby.

Nice to find a kindred spirit in the mountaineering community! I, too, am hopelessly addicted to the art of photography.... :lol: Hmm..... :shock:


Jim :D

User avatar
Posts: 120
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 7:54 pm
Location: Washington, D.C.

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby prone2jodl » Mon Apr 05, 2010 3:10 pm

Dancesatmoonrise wrote:Hey, if you have any great ideas for a fun collaboration that might pay for some of this crap we own, I'm up for it. It would be fun to get one of those printers - and free up my dependence on the local photo lab for quality prints. I presume 13" is the maximum width? Still, with a reasonable mat, you can get an 18x24 frame around those prints - not shabby


Actually my dad just got one (the photography gene is apparently hereditary)... has already sold a couple to friends and coworkers of his... he's not charging grand prices, but still, he's definitely making AT LEAST 400% markup after paper and ink, and he's only selling these things for $15-20... that's why i'm wondering if some sort of internet store might be fruitful... just a thought.
Stünd ich, Natur, vor dir ein Mann allein,
Da wär's der Mühe wert, ein Mensch zu sein.

User avatar
Posts: 1977
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 8:04 am
Location: Denver

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby Presto » Mon Apr 05, 2010 3:53 pm

On a related note ... a current article on summitpost by Steph Abegg (I've admired her work for quite awhile now).

http://www.summitpost.org/article/609987/Night-Photography-Physics-to-Photos.html

And her website:

http://sites.google.com/site/stephabegg/home

Happy trails! :D
As if none of us have ever come back with a cool, quasi-epic story instead of being victim to tragic rockfall, a fatal stumble, a heart attack, an embolism, a lightning strike, a bear attack, collapsing cornice, some psycho with an axe, a falling tree, carbon monoxide, even falling asleep at the wheel getting to a mountain. If you can't accept the fact that sometimes "s**t happens", then you live with the illusion that your epic genius and profound wilderness intelligence has put you in total and complete control of yourself, your partners, and the mountain. How mystified you'll be when "s**t happens" to you! - FM

Posts: 647
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 9:09 am

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby kimo » Mon Apr 05, 2010 9:22 pm

Presto wrote:On a related note ... a current article on summitpost by Steph Abegg (I've admired her work for quite awhile now). Happy trails! :D


I noticed that article this morning and liked what I saw. I've been looking forward to getting home from work so I can read it in detail. Thanks for posting it here.

The timing is excellent - in just a few nights, I'll be sleeping on the summit of 10K Mt. Baldy on a dark and clear night (fingers crossed). The lights of the Los Angeles will spread out at my feet like the embers of fading campfire, an electric campfire. I must not forget the tripod.

prone2jodl wrote:Actually my dad just got one (the photography gene is apparently hereditary)... has already sold a couple to friends and coworkers of his... he's not charging grand prices, but still, he's definitely making AT LEAST 400% markup after paper and ink, and he's only selling these things for $15-20... that's why i'm wondering if some sort of internet store might be fruitful... just a thought.


Seems like friends and coworkers are easy - after all, you know the people - but the internet, well, that might be a tougher sell. But of course it never hurts to try.

I need to do some monitor calibration because my print colors hardly resemble what I see on screen. The calibration tool is not cheap and neither is the ink. I've gone through a lot of ink testing different profiles and settings. And I haven't printed very many keepers. Printing is an art in itself. I don't know my per print cost at this point because I'm too lazy to do the math. But if I were selling prints, $15 to $20 for a large gallery-quality print seems like a reasonable asking price.

Dancesatmoonrise wrote:Nice to find a kindred spirit in the mountaineering community! I, too, am hopelessly addicted to the art of photography.... :lol: Hmm..... :shock:


LIve what you love.

Addicted? Well yes no. It's just something to do while climbing mountains. Or is that the other way around? Sometimes I'm confused #-o We're fortunate to have passions that fuel each other. Photography and mountaineering are both highly visceral arts. I agree with Isamu Noguchi, who said, "We are a landscape of all we have seen."

13" is the maximum width. Send me a full-res photo before we climb again. I'll print it and give it to you when we meet. I'd like to see what you think of the print quality.

User avatar
Posts: 1755
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2007 8:26 pm
Location: New York

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby nyker » Tue Apr 06, 2010 6:36 am

Fr best general purpose lens for your Nikon, use this one:

http://www.nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon/ProductDetail.page?pid=2149

I bring along a DSLR on every hike or climb, the point and shoots just don't have the flexibility for good consistent shots in all conditions, particularly low light conditions. I had used a D70, then D200 replaced that. I've used a half dozen point and shoot models from Nikon, Olympus and Sony, and while convenient due to their small size, their photos could not compare to the SLR.

I also have the 18-200VR by Nikon, and while its a good lens and arguably a replacement for the 18-70, I feel it is a bit soft on the lower end, where most of my photos are (under 70mm for landscapes). When seeing wildlife is more likely, I'll also include a 70-200 2.8 VR, which is far better
than the 18-200VR.

It all comes down to what you want and what quality you want and how much weight is a factor in your packing.

User avatar
Posts: 2146
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 7:47 pm
Location: Colorado Springs

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby Dancesatmoonrise » Tue Apr 06, 2010 9:51 pm

nyker wrote:Fr best general purpose lens for your Nikon, use this one:

http://www.nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon/ProductDetail.page?pid=2149

I bring along a DSLR on every hike or climb, the point and shoots just don't have the flexibility for good consistent shots in all conditions, particularly low light conditions. I had used a D70, then D200 replaced that. I've used a half dozen point and shoot models from Nikon, Olympus and Sony, and while convenient due to their small size, their photos could not compare to the SLR.

I also have the 18-200VR by Nikon, and while its a good lens and arguably a replacement for the 18-70, I feel it is a bit soft on the lower end, where most of my photos are (under 70mm for landscapes). When seeing wildlife is more likely, I'll also include a 70-200 2.8 VR, which is far better
than the 18-200VR.

It all comes down to what you want and what quality you want and how much weight is a factor in your packing.



SLR - good point on wildlife. Much faster shot-to-shot with the SLR vs. P&S.

However - low light - I find I can bring up most reasonable shots pretty well in post processing, and find it hard to justify three to five pounds of camera and lenses against the quality I'm getting with that 4 oz camera that I keep trying to snuff out all winter and it just hangs in there - go look at some of the TR's - none of my winter TRs have been with the SLR. Have had a couple contest winners with the 4oz camera and 9 oz camera as well - both Canon P&S cameras. Key is post processing. In fact, I've had more contest winners with the P&S cameras than the SLR - maybe b/c I'm usually in the backcountry with a P&S. As to SLRs, Nikon makes a very fine camera - I"m not familiar with it (I'm a Canon guy) but many friends shoot Nikon and have some fabulous images.

User avatar
Posts: 1755
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2007 8:26 pm
Location: New York

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby nyker » Wed Apr 07, 2010 9:28 am

Which Canon models have you used? I was actually looking for a P&S to use in a digiscoping setup, where an SLR is not very practical.

User avatar
Posts: 1755
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2007 8:26 pm
Location: New York

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby nyker » Wed Apr 07, 2010 9:30 am

There was ONE model P&S that did take great shots (The Nikon 5700 Coolpix) - the two downsides I had with this one was the shutter lag and also the roving focus that in low light, didn't have enough f-stop range to be effective.

User avatar
Posts: 390
Joined: Sun Nov 13, 2005 1:32 pm
Location: Woodland Park, CO

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby colorado yooper » Wed Apr 07, 2010 12:06 pm

I'm in no way a photo junkie like most of the above posters but I like my Canon G10 for P+S plus an adaptor for extra lenses. Certainly not a DSLR quality but fun to have extra lenses for the Point adn Shoot
To the High Crags!

User avatar
Posts: 2146
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 7:47 pm
Location: Colorado Springs

Re: Lens suggestions for mountain photography

Postby Dancesatmoonrise » Wed Apr 07, 2010 10:11 pm

nyker wrote:Which Canon models have you used? I was actually looking for a P&S to use in a digiscoping setup, where an SLR is not very practical.


I think it was the 790 that I really loved - got rid of it and wishing I hadn't - couldn't find another one; not current production.

It's replacement for me is the 1200. The 1200 has a lot of issues - but at 4 oz, it's my #1 candidate for winter 14ers. It will also shoot when nothing else will - like in 5 degrees and 50 mph winds.

Lag is an issue germaine to the variety - some better than others, but most all P&S cameras will far underperform SLRs in this department. Auto-focus issues have not been too bad in reasonably low light with the Canons.

The "better" camera is the SX 110. It has the older Digic III which offers a more lteral rendering than the new Digic IV processor - the latter being a little more painter-like - but you won't see the differences except at very high crop ratios. The SX 110 and it's newer counterparts have long tele lengths (10x - 36-360mm equivalent for the SX 110) which is impressive. We were out at the garden today, and went over to look at a route I retro'd in 97. It was late, but not last light, and with the full zoom I was able to get some great zoomed images where we could see the condition of the hardware 100' off the deck - even on the 3" viewer. The camera also sports full manual mode, and uses a pair of AA batteries - handy because you can sub the lithiums for lighter weight and more shots. Total weight is about 9 oz. It's still compact enough to fit in the hip-belt pocket of the pack for 14ers.

I had a G9 for a while - great camera. Quite a bit heavier. Lots of flexibility and capabilities the others don't have. However, the lens, if I recall, was not great, and really no better if even as good as the SX 110 lens. All of these will demonstrate chromatic aberration and most have a significant degree of barrel distortion at wide angle. That darned 1200 has some serious vignetting in one of the corners - though pretty repairable in PS.

Overall the best camera for the weight that I've used has probably been the SX 110.

My favorite SLR lens for the Canon is a Tamron 28-75/2.8. It's not very expensive but tack-sharp across most settings. It doesn't have IS (like VR on the Nikons) and I thought this might be a problem with handheld shots - 95% of my shooting - but it really hasn't been an issue. It's a great low-light performer. I'll probably get a prime in the f/2 or better range, perhaps in the 50-100 mm focal length range. There are several relatively inexpensive choices from Canon.

I haven't tried any of that new variety that Panasonic and Olympus have been pioneering - The concept sounds great for SLR quality at much lower weight and size - though the lack of a large assortment of good lenses (and the high price) have kept me away for now. If I had to get one, it would be the Panasonic. Can't recall the model, but it's the micro-four-thirds format. If it catches on and Canon or Nikon get into it, it could be something to consider for the future. Google "micro four thirds" for more info. Looks promising. But I haven't had one in hand.

PreviousNext

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests