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Winter Pack size

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Winter Pack size

Postby JDgreen » Sun Dec 09, 2007 12:41 pm

I am just wondering what pack sizes forum users carry for easier winter 14'er day climbs and simple snowshoe dayhikes. Do many of you use your summer daypacks in winter also? I have been looking at the Osprey Atmos 35 and Stratos 40 as they seem to fit me better. I would like to hear everyones favorites. One pack I could use all year would be nice but not absolutely necesary. I am more in the old and slow category than "light and fast". Currently using an old REI Lookout.
Thanks in advance.

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Re: Winter Pack size

Postby Gary Brady » Sun Dec 09, 2007 1:56 pm

JDgreen wrote:I am just wondering what pack sizes forum users carry for easier winter 14'er day climbs and simple snowshoe dayhikes. Do many of you use your summer daypacks in winter also? I have been looking at the Osprey Atmos 35 and Stratos 40 as they seem to fit me better. I would like to hear everyones favorites. One pack I could use all year would be nice but not absolutely necesary. I am more in the old and slow category than "light and fast". Currently using an old REI Lookout.
Thanks in advance.

I had a similar question earlier this year. Here is the thread http://www.14ers.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=10156&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0
I posed your exact question to the local backpacking store and their advice was the the Osprey Atmos 50. Which I purchased. It is an excellent pack and holds all of the gear I need for winter layering. It also has the room I need for contingencies in case I get stuck on a mountain and need to bivouac the night. The Atmos 35 is also an excellent pack. It is also on sale online at REI for $115. http://www.rei.com/OM/style/721425?cm_mmc=vl_osprey-_-datafeed_m-_-product-_-p2p Down from $159. IMHO Osprey has the best hip belt, back support and is more durable than other packs I looked at. They are also very comformable when weighed down.
Last edited by Gary Brady on Mon Dec 10, 2007 9:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
You guys have fun climbing this weekend. I can't go. Lumbergh's gonna have me come in on Saturday, I just know it.

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Postby hornpeak » Sun Dec 09, 2007 1:59 pm

HMMMM.... good question? Im a bit of a gear collector and have a summer and winter set ups. First I would round up all my winter gear and see if it fits in my summer pack. If not see how much you have left and put it something of a know size. For example you have two day packs of 2000 inches volume. All your winter gear will fit in both of them you might start looking for packs in the 4000-4500 ci area.
Other things to look for in a winter pack are compression straps and lashing points. Both handy to put extra gear on with. ie snowshoes,parka,tarp. I just looked at my Jansport winter pack and it is about 4300 inches capacity. Other packs will be rated in Liters. I dont know the conversion formula off the top of my head. Im sure others will have good sugestions what to use also.
Even though everyone looked at me a bit funny I took all my gear to the store where I bought my pack. Started loading them up them walked around till I found the one I liked most.

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Postby Tim McMarmot » Mon Dec 10, 2007 7:45 am

I use a Marmot Eiger 36 for winter day hikes. Its heavier than I'd like, but it carries all the extra winter gear (snowshoes, axe, crampons, clothing) and weight just fine. If I know I'll be wearing the snowshoes the entire time and don't need the axe or crampons, I drop back to my regular daypack, a REI UL 30.

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Postby strat1080 » Wed Dec 12, 2007 7:56 pm

I use my 50L weekend pack for just about everything I do. It only weighs 2.75lbs and compresses nicely. I can always fit everything I need and can compress it to a smaller size when needed as well. Most of my gear is pretty light and compressible except snow and winter gear(snowshoes, crampons, etc).
Quit whining and move your %$# up that mountain.

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Postby Kojones » Wed Dec 12, 2007 8:48 pm

Gregory Denali Pro pack has lasted me for 7 years. I've used it for winter trips and summer trips. Perfect size, durable, and works well with sleds.

Kojones
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Kojones: "No, only half the hike is uphill."
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Postby lordhelmut » Wed Dec 12, 2007 11:17 pm

I've been trying to find the ideal winter bag for quite some time, used to have a Kelty I got tax free in some indian reservation near Lander, Wy (56$). A few months ago I got the Gregory G-pack (not Z). Its the large size, size about 3000 cc's. Its a tad small for weekend excursions, a tent doesn't fit too well, along with everything else, but its perfect for winter climbs. I usually carry, depending on the mountain, crampons, a down jacket in a stuff sack, a fleece liner just in case, a helmet, and an extra layer of clothes, gloves, hat and goggles. Here's a write up on it, its still on sale on the REI outlet :

http://www.rei.com/REI-Outlet/product/763766

The material feels like it would rip easily, but its actually just the opposite. And its very light and carries weight very well, I've fit up to 35 lbs, anything more than that is pushing its limits.

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Postby austinsnow » Thu Dec 13, 2007 5:13 pm

If you can do it, I would invest in a winter pack as well. Advantages include durability in materials made for winters adverse conditions, special compartments that can easily carry crampons, ice axe, harness, and other gear, and water resistant materials on the pack to keep your possessions inside dry. Check out Gregory & Cold Cold World Packs.
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Re: Winter Pack size

Postby wojo » Fri Dec 14, 2007 7:22 pm

JDgreen wrote:I am just wondering what pack sizes forum users carry for easier winter 14'er day climbs and simple snowshoe dayhikes. Do many of you use your summer daypacks in winter also? I have been looking at the Osprey Atmos 35 and Stratos 40 as they seem to fit me better. I would like to hear everyones favorites. One pack I could use all year would be nice but not absolutely necesary. I am more in the old and slow category than "light and fast". Currently using an old REI Lookout.
Thanks in advance.


I prefer the Osprey Atmos 50...
http://www.ospreypacks.com/Packs/AtmosSeriesMens/Atmos50/
PROS:
Big enough for stuffing bivy and extra cold weather clothing in main compartment.
Easy access waterproof side zippers for top side compartments.
The stretch woven front pocket is great for snow shovel storage or temporary gear storage.
The dual loops are good for multiple pole and ice ax mountings.
I especially like the shock core and daisy chain tie off system on each side.
I also run a 6ft length of 1/8 shock core cross laced thru the side daisy chains over the outside - good for holding quick gear change outs (crampons, sandals, snow shoes and the like...)
that I can secure with the extra tie offs on the daisy chain.
CONS:
I tend to dump things from the top pocket.
Stretch woven side pockets are just big enough for a Nalgene, but can tear when things like snow pickets are stowed there.

There is an Atmos 35 & 65 for differing storage needs.

Hope this helps.

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Re: Winter Pack size

Postby thunderinacircle » Mon Dec 17, 2007 7:54 pm

I can't help but recommend that you look at the Gregory Z55. A little bit cheaper, it is 4 onces heavier unfortunately if you are an once counter, but 350 or so CU larger (assuming M size) and the suspension is great. It touches your shoulders and your hips and that is it! You can fit an entire adult arm through the space between the pack and your back. This is especially nice during the summer; great year-round pack. The only time I use anything else is on a long trips when I need more room.
when the moon first rose tonight, my eyes were met with such a beautiful sight. a feeling deep inside so hard to explain, so familiar yet impossible to name. this is the place where dreams come true, a part of me and a part of you. this is where our spirits fly, on beams of light across the sky...and i'll meet you, in the valley of the full moon. as bright as the sun, in the middle of the afternoon.

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