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Tubbs Snowshoes?

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Postby norseman » Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:21 pm

If you buy the low end model of any brand all they're good for is cruising around the back yard on the flats. If you're going in the mountains you need to upgrade to a model that has some beef to it and durability. You can rent at REI and find one that works for you.
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Postby changingground » Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:37 pm

norseman wrote:If you buy the low end model of any brand all they're good for is cruising around the back yard on the flats. If you're going in the mountains you need to upgrade to a model that has some beef to it and durability. You can rent at REI and find one that works for you.


Snowshoes, like skis, climbing shoes, crampons, and other tools for getting around the mountains and woods, have a certain set of skills to go with them that make them far more useful than one might guess straight out of the parking lot. Having spent many many days tramping around the woods and mountains in deep snow on (gasp) wood frame snowshoes without crampons of any sort I'm here to tell you- most of today's snowshoes are vast improvements over what was widely available 20 years (with the noteworthy exception of Sherpas). If you are careful about how you spend your money, don't let yourself get sucked into buying the most expensive because you've been told that the lower end snoes are only "...good for is cruising around the back yard on the flats."

I'm sure that some of the newer, higher end shoes are very nice. But not having them shouldn't keep you off of the mountains.

Sorry for the rant- just my $0.02. I swear, I sound more and more like my dad every day.

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Postby Presto » Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:56 pm

I agree with the renting first, Norseman. We rented a few different types before we purchased our Tubbs (and, if I recall correctly, we paid over $200 per pair at the time for new Tubbs and that was obviously a long time ago). So, spending the money at the time and getting quality has paid off since they've lasted for so long after much use. That's one piece of equipment worth spending the money on for quality. Not to sound repetitive, though, the customer service of the company you purchase from is very important. The fact that Tubbs, without any charge, replaced parts on our snowshoes has extended the life of those snowshoes.

And, hey ChangingGround, sometimes it's a good thing to sound like your dad! :D
Last edited by Presto on Thu Nov 01, 2007 1:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
As if none of us have ever come back with a cool, quasi-epic story instead of being victim to tragic rockfall, a fatal stumble, a heart attack, an embolism, a lightning strike, a bear attack, collapsing cornice, some psycho with an axe, a falling tree, carbon monoxide, even falling asleep at the wheel getting to a mountain. If you can't accept the fact that sometimes "s**t happens", then you live with the illusion that your epic genius and profound wilderness intelligence has put you in total and complete control of yourself, your partners, and the mountain. How mystified you'll be when "s**t happens" to you! - FM

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Postby CorduroyCalves » Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:59 pm

I own the Tubbs Ridgeline snowshoes and I like them a lot.
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Postby norseman » Thu Nov 01, 2007 1:38 pm

I own a pair of Tubbs Sierras, and at the time not low end snowshoes. I tried a lot of brands and they seemed the most durable of the lot. Just by looking at what you get for $100.00 these days I wouldn't go low end if you carry a heavy pack, go into the mountains alot with varied terrain and conditions. Don't get "sucked" into using equipment you hope will stand up because someone says they'll do. Match them to what you'll use them for, do some research. You want to cruise around the yard by all means go cheap. I own a pair of wooden beavertail snowshoes as well, old school but work well in deep snow.
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Postby thebeave7 » Thu Nov 01, 2007 1:48 pm

As with Jordan I've recently converted to AT gear, thus rarely using my snowshoes, they are just obsolete now. I do still own and like my set of MSR Evo Ascents. The plastic MSR shoes are unrivaled for durability, I've never broken a piece in 5 years of use.

When I worked in industry a few years back I heard numerous stories about durability problems with Tubbs and Atlas shoes. Heck we used to rent Atlas shoes and the plastic hub at the tip would break at least once a season, rivets would occasionally pop out(note these were absurdly abused). Granted everyone has different experiences, but for mountaineering the MSRs are unparalleled for durability and traction on steep stuff(my opinion of course).

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Postby changingground » Thu Nov 01, 2007 2:02 pm

norseman wrote:I own a pair of Tubbs Sierras, and at the time not low end snowshoes. I tried a lot of brands and they seemed the most durable of the lot. Just by looking at what you get for $100.00 these days I wouldn't go low end if you carry a heavy pack, go into the mountains alot with varied terrain and conditions. Don't get "sucked" into using equipment you hope will stand up because someone says they'll do. Match them to what you'll use them for, do some research. You want to cruise around the yard by all means go cheap. I own a pair of wooden beavertail snowshoes as well, old school but work well in deep snow.

Since we seem to be going back and forth, I'll have to admit that I haven't inspected snowshoes recently, and that Tubbs and Atlas may not be paying attention to quality the way they should. That said, I'm always wary of the "you've gotta have the best" mentality, especially when very few people aspire to be world class athletes, nor require world class equipment. On closer reading of your post, I realize that you do stress doing the research and making an educated decision. And that, of course, is always the best way to be sure you have the gear you will need.

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Postby coloradokevin » Thu Nov 01, 2007 2:06 pm

gander4 wrote:Tubbs are fine if you are walking on flat ground. I would never attempt a peak ascent with them. The MSR Lightning Ascents are the only way to go for stability and traction.


Yeah, I looked at the lightning, and even demo'd a set... However, despite being a very nice shoe, I don't really see that it would give me anything that my Evo Ascents don't already give. They aren't really any bigger than the Ascents w/ tails, which is part of the reason I've started to look for an aggressive shoe outside of the MSR line!

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Postby downclimb » Thu Nov 01, 2007 8:16 pm

I have a pair of Tubbs and so far I really like them, but haven't had anything else to compare them to. Tubbs and Atlas are owned by the same parent company, and some searching on the net led me to this interesting look at the snowshoe industry:

http://www.snowshoemag.com/view_content ... ent_id=143

Postby Bean » Thu Nov 01, 2007 8:53 pm

All snowshoes everywhere suck.

Skis + skins + ski crampons (if necessary) + regular crampons (if necessary) will get you anywhere you need to go.
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Postby coloradokevin » Thu Nov 01, 2007 9:35 pm

Bean wrote:All snowshoes everywhere suck.

Skis + skins + ski crampons (if necessary) + regular crampons (if necessary) will get you anywhere you need to go.


Ahh, yeah... But, I don't have $1,500+ to put together the ski setup I'd like at the moment. Right now I have a pseudo-AT setup I occasionally use just for the sake of skiing in the backcountry... it is a Naxo binding mounted on some ancient Fischer (too-skinny) randonee skis, and using my standard heavy downhill boots...w/ G3 skins. Unfortunately that setup is far too heavy for any serious distance in the backcountry!

In fact, I tried it on an outing at Cameron Pass with my better half one time... While I typically smoke her uphill, she smoked me on snowshoes while I was on that exact ski setup. It is just too heavy to be fast! Of course, my downhill time was more than a wee bit faster than hers :)

So, I suppose I have a viable binding... If I just come up with a good ski and a good boot I'd be in decent shape.

What are you skiing with?

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Postby MUni Rider » Thu Nov 01, 2007 10:22 pm

downclimb wrote:I have a pair of Tubbs and so far I really like them, but haven't had anything else to compare them to. Tubbs and Atlas are owned by the same parent company, and some searching on the net led me to this interesting look at the snowshoe industry:

http://www.snowshoemag.com/view_content ... ent_id=143


Really good article. Reminds me of what happend a few years back in the kayak industry. Perception and Dagger, (the two biggest names in the white water kayak industry of the day), are now both under the Watermark umbrella. Sounds kinda like what K2 wants to do to snowshoes.

A couple years later, as to not compete with themselves, the Perception side of the house stopped all whitewater kayak production and went strictly flatwater models. Something that was promised would not happen at the time of the merger.

The big heads at Watermark must of figured that everyone buying a Perception boat would just buy a Dagger boat instead and they would keep their market share. Oops.

Today there are more smaller brands with more models that I can ever keep track of. Instead of 2 or 3 big names and a handfull of smaller guys.....Now there are a bunch of smaller guys who are getting bigger al the time. Some of which had been (I believe) Perception designers/Perception's pro-boaters that now make their own boats, and now compete with the Watermark.

.....but wait, this posting is about snowshoes.

I've only snow shoed once, plan to get some eventully and I will use the info from the acticle to help in selecting a pair of shoes to buy. Thanks for the post.
"It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by the dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions and spends himself in a worthy course; who at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who, at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly; so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory or defeat." (Theodore Roosevelt)

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