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Tubbs Snowshoes?

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Tubbs Snowshoes?

Postby coloradokevin » Thu Nov 01, 2007 1:06 am

Just thought I'd see if any of my fellow climbers have had personal experiences (good or bad) with Tubbs snowshoes?

I've been using MSR snowshoes for a quite a few years now, and have had some experience with Atlas shoes in the past. While I'm happy with the overall performance of my current Denali Evo Ascent shoes, I'm not happy with their flotation when I'm burdened with a heavy winter pack (even with the tails!).

Thus, I'm kind of starting to look for a second set of snowshoes... I've been intrigued by the two shoes at the top of the Tubbs line, though I think they are changing the name and design a bit this year (I think they may have been the Ridgeline and Mountain, or someting... and now they are the Mountaineer and couloir?).

Anyway, I'm looking for a shoe with good performance in the steep and deep, and it needs to be large enough to handle my weight of 165lbs plus an overnight winter pack (thus, I am figuring at least a full width 30 inch shoe... and in my experiences the Evo won't cut it for this particular task in a Colorado snowpack, even with tails).

As I said, I otherwise love the performance of my current snowshoes, they just won't handle the weight for some of my more serious trips.

So, any thoughts on Tubbs?

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Postby gme » Thu Nov 01, 2007 7:44 am

I've used Tubbs and I like them. I'm heavier than you, and Tubbs provide very good flotation for me. I know among users on this site MSRs are prefered, but Tubbs do make a very good snowshoe.

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Postby norseman » Thu Nov 01, 2007 7:49 am

I'm 6'6" and 215 lbs. I've had Tubbs for years, never had a problem. They've taken a beating, float really well. No complaints.
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Postby hurdles » Thu Nov 01, 2007 8:02 am

i have atlases but my wife has tubbs and i had used tubbs for about a yr before getting my atlases and liked them also.
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Postby CO Native » Thu Nov 01, 2007 8:16 am

I hate Tubbs snow shoes. Poor stability and traction. Check out the lightning ascents instead. They have excellent traction and come with the Televator for steep ascents. They are lighter than the tubbs for the same size (though not really all that much lighter). The buckle system is also very easy to use with winter mitts on.
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Postby Presto » Thu Nov 01, 2007 8:33 am

My husband and I have had our Tubbs snowshoes for about 16 years. They've lasted that long because of excellent company customer service. Whenever a part (binding, stitching, etc.) has worn out, we simply take it to REI, they ship it to Tubbs, Tubbs fixes it for free and they send it back to REI. No charge ever. Not even for shipping. In fact, they have replaced an entire binding on one of my husband's snowshoes. We have rather large snowshoes as we tend to pack a lot of weight. Very happy with the product.
As if none of us have ever come back with a cool, quasi-epic story instead of being victim to tragic rockfall, a fatal stumble, a heart attack, an embolism, a lightning strike, a bear attack, collapsing cornice, some psycho with an axe, a falling tree, carbon monoxide, even falling asleep at the wheel getting to a mountain. If you can't accept the fact that sometimes "s**t happens", then you live with the illusion that your epic genius and profound wilderness intelligence has put you in total and complete control of yourself, your partners, and the mountain. How mystified you'll be when "s**t happens" to you! - FM

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Postby gander4 » Thu Nov 01, 2007 9:01 am

Tubbs are fine if you are walking on flat ground. I would never attempt a peak ascent with them. The MSR Lightning Ascents are the only way to go for stability and traction.

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Postby gdthomas » Thu Nov 01, 2007 9:35 am

gander4 wrote:Tubbs are fine if you are walking on flat ground. I would never attempt a peak ascent with them. The MSR Lightning Ascents are the only way to go for stability and traction.


This has been my experience as well. My wife's Tubbs work well on benign terrain but she's complained about slipping on steeper aspects (perhaps there's a more aggressive model). My MSR Evo's, on the other hand, don't slip where hers do.

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Postby Jcwhite » Thu Nov 01, 2007 9:50 am

Just say no to the boats....
Skis are the only REAL way to go.
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming WOW! WHAT A RIDE."- Hunter S Thompson

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Postby Presto » Thu Nov 01, 2007 10:07 am

I would have to concur on the slippage with the Tubbs. No verticality.
As if none of us have ever come back with a cool, quasi-epic story instead of being victim to tragic rockfall, a fatal stumble, a heart attack, an embolism, a lightning strike, a bear attack, collapsing cornice, some psycho with an axe, a falling tree, carbon monoxide, even falling asleep at the wheel getting to a mountain. If you can't accept the fact that sometimes "s**t happens", then you live with the illusion that your epic genius and profound wilderness intelligence has put you in total and complete control of yourself, your partners, and the mountain. How mystified you'll be when "s**t happens" to you! - FM

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Postby Rockymtnhigh69 » Thu Nov 01, 2007 11:25 am

Presto wrote:I would have to concur on the slippage with the Tubbs. No verticality.


Which model of the Tubbs do you all have?

I have had no issues climbing vertically..
On my first take-off, I hit second gear and went through the speed limit on a two-lane blacktop highway full of ranch traffic. By the time I went up to third, I was going 75 and the tach was barely above 4000 rpm....
And that's when the Ducati got its second wind. From 4000 to 6000 in third will take you from 75 mph to 95 in two seconds - and after that, Bubba, you still have fourth, fifth, and sixth. Ho, ho.

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Postby Presto » Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:12 pm

I'd have to check when I get home ... I was thinking they were 16+ years old, but I know I wore them a lot before we finished our 14'ers which was in 1991, so they must be older than that (I'm not familiar with how many models Tubbs came out with that long ago). I can tell you why there is slippage, though. The design is such that the teeth on the bottom of the foot portion only go horizontal across the top and the bottom. There are no side teeth things. Sorry to not be more technically descriptive ... hope I made sense. But, unlike others, I do not HATE my Tubbs. :D
As if none of us have ever come back with a cool, quasi-epic story instead of being victim to tragic rockfall, a fatal stumble, a heart attack, an embolism, a lightning strike, a bear attack, collapsing cornice, some psycho with an axe, a falling tree, carbon monoxide, even falling asleep at the wheel getting to a mountain. If you can't accept the fact that sometimes "s**t happens", then you live with the illusion that your epic genius and profound wilderness intelligence has put you in total and complete control of yourself, your partners, and the mountain. How mystified you'll be when "s**t happens" to you! - FM

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