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Mount Massive with a 9 month old!

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Postby Kate » Wed Aug 01, 2007 1:53 pm

gurlyclimber wrote: If anyone would like to put me in a baby backpack and carry me up a mountain, maybe I'll have a better answer for you then.


LOL, I second that! CODave & I were at the foot surgeon today discussing my stupid fractured toe when he gave me the go ahead to hike up... but not down. Quite frustrated, I looked at the surgeon and said "So how am I supposed to get down?!" The surgeon then turned to Dave and said "Isn't that your job?"

Funny stuff...

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Postby Piker » Wed Aug 01, 2007 2:38 pm

Kate wrote:
gurlyclimber wrote: If anyone would like to put me in a baby backpack and carry me up a mountain, maybe I'll have a better answer for you then.


LOL, I second that! CODave & I were at the foot surgeon today discussing my stupid fractured toe when he gave me the go ahead to hike up... but not down. Quite frustrated, I looked at the surgeon and said "So how am I supposed to get down?!" The surgeon then turned to Dave and said "Isn't that your job?"

Funny stuff...


Both of those comments cracked me up, thanks for the afternoon laughter.
:lol:
Have you ever stopped to think....then forget to start again?

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Postby gurlyclimber » Wed Aug 01, 2007 2:40 pm

Yeah, i have to admit the visual of myself being carried up in a baby carrier kinda made me laugh too.

Bummer about the fracture Kate! If CODave carries you down, you must take photos! :-)
There are some trips you never fully come back from.

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Postby Devin » Wed Aug 01, 2007 4:27 pm

jason415 wrote:There has been studies that show that kids that have spent time at higher elevations are smaller then kids the same age at normal elevations.


Dang. I grew up at 7200 ft and spent alot of time at higher elevation as a kid. If I only would have known that I could be bigger by being a flatlander.

Oh well. I guess that I will just have to settle for being 6'8". :roll: :lol:

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Postby cw » Wed Aug 01, 2007 8:57 pm

gurlyclimber wrote:To the parents who take their babies up, how do you keep them hydrated? My boys always snubbed a bottle or sippy cup full of water. Maybe use Pediasure? I've had many moments in the mountains where I've felt like someone was squeezing my brain so hard that my brain was going to start spilling out of my ears. Since 9 month olds can't talk very well, they lack the ability to tell you that they are in pain. How do you differentiate between altitude sickness crying and teething pain while you're up there? Do you just turn around when they crying gets to be too much? By then I imagine the baby would be in a lot of pain.


Good question, my daughter is breast fed, and also eating solid foods. We follow a strict feeding schedule when not climbing, but usually stick pretty close to her schedule even when climbing. Usually, we'll time our start and finish times around her feeding schedule and take extras along for the chance of being out longer than planned (and even if we run out of solid food Mom's got plenty of reserve :lol: ). Basically, we're usually ready for a break when it's time to feed anyway - so we all get a rest. Prior to departing, same as my wife and I, we properly hydrate our daughter (usually a full sippie cup of water on the road to the TH).

As far as crying goes, well, nobody knows a baby's cries like their mother, and even I can usually get the different cries right. Crying to us usually means, "I have a poopy diaper, please change me," "I'm hungry please feed me," "I'm tired and ready for my nap now," etc. If we meet all these needs and she is still showing signs of irritability, than our assumption should be AMS and we'd descend immediately. As I stated before (and this is from credible sources) the chance of AMS occuring in a child is the same as in an adult and since we live in COS we are comfortable that our daughter is adequately acclimatized.
CW

"Put your mind to it, and your body will follow..."

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Postby Viking4Life » Wed Aug 01, 2007 11:09 pm

grizz wrote:Wow! Climbing a 14er has less risk than driving down I-25 to get to the 14er. Relax, be happy, and don't worry about it. Any child at any age is always at risk, same goes for an adult. Anything can happen at anytime on a 14er or not.

I cross Hampden everyday for lunch. Maybe I should not do that anymore? I'm putting myself in great danger for a taco.

Be real!


I said that I am not against taking an infant up on a 14er. I think that if you keep an eye on the child, and don't do anything stupid or ignore any signs that a problem might occur, than taking an infant to 14,000 feet is just as safe as anything. Now, I could write a long time on all the risks involved in your taco eating, but, I'll stick to the topic...

CW and Pingen, I just read a report by the Department of Pediatrics and Department of Neurology at the University of Innsbruck in conjunction with the Children's Hospital of Salzburg, that suggests that the risk of SIDs increases gradually with increasing altitude of residence.

I am looking at a consensus by the ISMM, International Society of Mountain Medicine, part of which states some information about SIDs and sudden gains in altitude. It said they had not made a direct connection yet due to "conflicting" reports. If you research SIDs, one believed cause of SIDs is malfunction of part of the brain that controls breathing. When a baby's oxygen flow is cutoff or slowed in sleep, a baby's body "adjusts", and it also wakes and crys. Sometimes, that does not happen, the baby fails to get in a better position to breath, and the baby dies. So, therefore, the ISMM voiced a concern that there is an ever so slight possibility that SIDs could occur when a developing baby's body receives lower levels of oxygen than it is used too. The baby simply fails to adjust.

Now, is going to 14,000 feet for a little bit going to make your child that much more suscetible to diseases like this? Probably not, but, the information of that possibility is out there. I found it relevant and hinted at it in my first post.

CW, HAPE and HACE obviously occur because of hypoxia. I wouldn't be afraid to say that if you look around, you'll see many reports that say infants and children have a harder time adjusting than a full grown adult, thus, I wouldn't doubt that an infants risk of developing those two, or any other hypoxia-induced problem is higher than adults. Heck, taking a new born or very young infants to higher altitudes can make their body reverse it's natural pulmonary adaptations and attempt to breath again as if it is in the womb! A grown adult is still suscetible to problems, and I would not doubt a ninth month old is out of the woods either.

Is the risk so high that you cannot take an infant on your hikes? In my opinion, probably not (that does make me right). It's all up to one's personal opinion...

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Postby summit co kc » Thu Aug 02, 2007 3:00 am

i only know that if i dont really force my self to drink i still get headaches and i live at 9000. not something i would want to put anyone through let alone a 9 month old.

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Postby gurlyclimber » Thu Aug 02, 2007 8:09 am

As far as crying goes, well, nobody knows a baby's cries like their mother


Oh I don't know about all that! The last time I pooped my pants it sounded NOTHING like the sounds my sons made when they pooped theirs.

Good luck on your future family hikes.
There are some trips you never fully come back from.

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Postby cheeseburglar » Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:21 am

I blame all my problems on my dad dropping me on my head out of a backpack during a ski tour on Mt Rainier when I was an infant.
At least your child will have better things to blame than the television.
The marmot said “Nobody is perfect and you are not nobody.”

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Re: Mount Massive with a 9 month old!

Postby longmonster » Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:36 pm

pingen wrote: While hiking, I was impressed with the complementing and encouraging comments I received from all the other hikers (not a single negative comment was made). Everybody seemed excited to see a 9 month old on the trail.


It must be OK then....

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Postby mount_quandary » Fri Aug 10, 2007 9:08 pm

As a flatlander....I'm from Wisconsin, one of the things that I think really needs to be mentioned is that you are all from Colorado!!! that is important as others from Sea Level often read posts and then think "Hey" I read it's OK to hike a 14er with a baby...coming from 0 to 14er could be lethal (at least I would think that could be very dangerous) just remember when posting stuff to be bold that others should NOT do something like that with their babies...
we just came back from summiting Mt. Elbert...although we acclimated that altitude was a killer I can't imagine subjecting a baby to those heights ...our daughter at age 11 became quite sick several years ago at 12,000 ft. at least she could tell us what she was feeling a baby would be another story...
anyway just a reminder, we knew coming out what to do and what to look for but seriously many people come to this site and think a 14er is going to be a breeze...
thanks for allowing my input...
Hold your head up high, keep your eyes fixed where the trail meets the sky, live like you're not afraid of dying, don't be scared just enjoy the ride!

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Postby longmonster » Fri Aug 10, 2007 9:37 pm

mount_quandary wrote: As a flatlander....
thanks for allowing my input...


All are welcome.

Don't go into the light.

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