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Another d@mn bad dog-owner

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Another d@mn bad dog-owner

Postby PapaBanucci » Wed Jul 04, 2007 5:58 am

OK, so I've been bit before. I'm a runner and run something like 1,250 miles per year.

Last Christmas day I got bit by a dog while I was running a trail in a park. The other party had a number of jerks, blaming me, etc. I couldn't believe it.

Anyhow, I have a scar, maybe for life, on my left forearm that noticeable from probably 10 feet away. As a guy it's not that big of a deal I suppose.

Saturday I hiked up Shavano and Tabeguache.

On the way down, at maybe 12,000 ft. or so I encounter a dog. Some sort of mid-size mix with a pack.

And he's standing there in the middle of the trail. Off leash of course. Growling at me.

Not in too much of a passive way either. He looks serious enough.

I look over and see the owners. Party of four, two couples, maybe in their 60s. Sitting there. They look exhausted.

And the dog is growling at me.

I try to keep my eyes diverted away so as to not provoke. I've already stopped my descent and am standing there about ten feet up trail from him.

He continues growling.

The owners just sit. Do nothing. Say nothing. I'm thinking, sixty years old and their exhibiting all the wisdom and responsibility of a 16 year old. Sheesh, it's like some people never actually grow up.

"Would you get up and take care of your dog," I say in a direct way.

"Oh she doesn't usually blah, blah, blah," comes out of the woman's mouth.

Like I care.

"Ma'am! Get up and take repsonsibility for your dog. Now!"

She struggles to her feet.

The dog starts to make a bit of a move for me. I'm thinking fight or flight. Get bloody and bash it's head in with a rock if I need to. Or run back up hill. My feet already hurt enough from boots I need to replace anyhow.

As she goes toward her dog, she says something about how she's usually such a good girl.

"Ma'am! The only responsible thing for you to do at this point is to say, 'I am sorry and I will control my dog.' Get over here NOW and take responsibility for your dog."

She gets the dog restrained.

I show her the scar on my left forearm.

I tell her, "I've been bit before and it cost the other party several thousand dollars. You need to take responsibility for your dog and your dog has no business being up here."

She makes a patronizing comment to the others in her party about me being bit before and me being "scared" of her dog.

I wonder if she knows how willingly I would have bashed her dog's skull in with a piece of granite if it attacked me.
Last edited by PapaBanucci on Fri Jul 06, 2007 6:09 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby GoLoaf » Wed Jul 04, 2007 6:41 am

Uptight much?

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Postby Two Headed Boy » Wed Jul 04, 2007 7:12 am

I wonder if she knows how willingly I would have bashed her dog's skull in with a piece of granite if it attacked me.


"They drew first blood not me."

And then after you bash the dog's skull in with sharp granite you can sew up your own lacerations with a fishinghook and fishing line and go after the local dog shelter with an M-60 machine gun and homemade explosives.

I see a possilble Rambo 4 coming very soon.

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Postby GoLoaf » Wed Jul 04, 2007 7:36 am

"Ma'am! Get up and take repsonsibility for your dog. Now!"
Image

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Postby tylermacguire » Wed Jul 04, 2007 8:07 am

Maybe you should discuss some of these feelings with a mental health professional :?

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Postby ThinAir » Wed Jul 04, 2007 8:36 am

Even though there seems to be a consensus that your a high strung headcase, im sympathetic to your view. Its up to a dog owner to be all over his/her animal when on the trail, not relying on the grace of others to abide by fido's little tantrums. If you felt threatened by this unleashed pooch, and the owner reacted slowly and grudgingly to address it, than, imo, you can deal with it however you see fit.

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Postby Two Headed Boy » Wed Jul 04, 2007 8:49 am

Thinair - I agree with you. Notice how you said stuff like -
imo, you can deal with it however you see fit.
and not things like -
She makes a patronizing comment to the others in her party about me being bit before and me being "scared" of her dog. I wonder if she knows how willingly I would have bashed her dog's skull in with a piece of granite if it attacked me.


The point gets across much better when you think before you write.

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run on by!

Postby giarcd » Wed Jul 04, 2007 8:51 am

I have encountered many dogs in the mountains,99% of the owners are very aware and responsible. To bad you had previous encounter that has you spooked a bit.---Best to just go on buy and not give much thought ,stay observant----good luck

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Postby 2_Salukis » Wed Jul 04, 2007 8:59 am

As you can probably tell from my ID, I'm a dog guy and take them 14ing. I have no problem at all with your feelings about what you encountered.

One of my two was bit by an off-leash Shepherd two years ago and hasn't been the same since (she was on leash). She's still never shown aggression towards humans on hikes, but if another dog comes up and wants to do the typical, "let me smell you in the privates," she'll growl and snap. Of course she's not off-leash around dogs for that very reason, but that doesn't prevent off-leash dogs from trying to get close and sniff anyway.

It amazes me how many owners are oblivious to what their dogs are doing, who they are bothering, etc., even when it's obvious that we're trying to keep ours and theirs separated. I'd never considered the granite rock response, but I've been awful close to a boot under the chin.

The biggest issue I have is owner's lack of "ownership" for allowing their dog to get in the situation in the first place. Typically the leash will be right in their hand or hanging out a side pocket of the pack. And the apology rate percentage is something in the single digits, while the dirty looks for my leashed dog snapping at their free dog is probably the majority.

IMO it's the owners, not the dogs that are the problem. Just like with kids - no one else cares how much of a sweet, cute, little angel you think you have.

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Postby mildly neurotic » Wed Jul 04, 2007 9:19 am

I nearly lost my left arm to a German Shepard as a young boy. People in general don't give a damn about who or what their dog is biting or attacking. The typical response will be "he's never bitten anyone before" or "he's usually friendly". As you can tell from the responses so far, most dog owners think it is their right for dogs to roam free and sniff your ass, jump on you, lick you, growl at you, and bite you. If you don't like that you must be an evil dog hater. How many children have been killed by pit bulls, and you still hear people going off about how they still like the breed ,they're fine dogs if you train them right, yada yada... The most problematic situations I have experienced are when I am trying to pass a camping area before dawn and the dogs are left outside while the owners sleep inside the tent. The least I can do is yell some profanities and hope to wake the people up before I am attacked. Personal responsibility and respect for others is long gone in this country.

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Postby kurty[B] » Wed Jul 04, 2007 9:28 am

I feel ya PapaBanucci. I have a few friends who can't stand dogs, and realize not everyone is a dog lover; I personally love them even after having a nice scar on my wrist from being attacked by a pit bull.

I used to have a rottweiler/blue heeler mix who had the colors of a rottie and the body of a blue heeler. Loved to hike, but I taught him to stay within eyesight of myself, and if he heard or saw anything (man or animal) he would stay put, or come right back to me so I could put his leash on; not everyone likes to stumble onto a rottie loose on the trail no matter how nice he is.

I was on top of Gray's with a friend who can't stand dogs. He was enjoying a nice day on the summit, when a yellow lab came to say "hi". It wasn't aggressive, just wanted to check people out and possibly seek some petting attention. He can't stand dogs, he grabbed his trekking pole and was ready to strike. The owner laughed "Oh, he's a nice dog". Unfortunately, my friend didn't want to have a dog trying to lick his face at all (friendly or no). We left the summit ASAP before the situation went south.

My suggestion is if it's an area where "leash laws" are posted I don't care if your dog is roaming free when no one is around, or even when other dog lovers are around, but if you notice somebody being uncomfortable because of the presence of your unleashed dog, well, leash the pup. Technically, you're the one at fault having him off the leash.

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Postby jspydr » Wed Jul 04, 2007 9:32 am

I had several close encounters as a kid too, and will not be a victim of someone else's irresponsibility. I always carry a knife on my person, hiking or otherwise. I'll be dang'd if I let my kids get bit by a dog who's 'never bit anyone before.' If it latches on to me, I'll be the last person it ever bites.
Last edited by jspydr on Wed Jul 04, 2007 9:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
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