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Dog Rescue

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby Floyd » Fri Aug 14, 2009 11:36 am

ktimm wrote:My dogs do plenty of peaks and plenty of long days and have never worn booties or had issues with their feet. It's what you are used to, if your dog never goes out and then gets on scree there will be a problem. Can we get rid of all the deer, elk and bear poo as well ? I really wish the horse people would pack theirs out and the ones who graze livestock on public lands would do the same.


The problem with dog/people poo is not the fact that it's poo, it's actually an issue with the contents. Some animals eat the stuff and the preservatives and chemicals found in our foods can negatively affect their systems. Since wildlife eat organic/local vegatation or animals, their poo isn't an issue. We bring our baggage from civilization with us which may impact the environment in more ways than just aesthetics/scents.

I don't have any backup on this, but it is my understanding... So don't quote me, but this is what I've heard. Personally, I carry a garden trowl in my pack and bury the stuff at least 6 inches underground - so filter your water accordingly.

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby Snowgirl » Sun Aug 16, 2009 12:43 am

Wow, this thread did take an interesting turn.
Back to dog boots for a moment, someone mentioned that "some dog's feet are softer than others" from being indoors. This is a partial truth, however, it is important to note that rocks, especially scree rocks, can be quite sharp and could cut the pads or the delicate skin between the toes. Also, the surface of the pad can wear down over rough terrain as well, no matter how well conditioned they are to being outside. So whether or not you choose to have your dog wear booties, keep a close eye on their feet and have a plan for if your four-legged friend gets a cut or has sore feet. This also applies to dogs that do wear boots, because they can get rubs on their legs and tops of their toes. Just like a person with blisters, a dog with sore feet is not a happy one and you always want it to be a good experience for your dog as well as you. The same for dog packs, which can be used well or, in the case of an overweight Lab I saw hiking a (to remain anonymous) 14er, a hindrance and a health concern. As a general rule, if I'm going on a hike I bring a first-aid kit for me, and one for my dog that includes: hydration salts (mostly for the flavoring that it adds to the water, which encourages my dog to drink), vetwrap, cotton stretch bandaging, zinc oxide sunscreen (for her pink nose) 1/2 inch tape, antibiotic ointment, an instant ice pack, thermometer, bandage scissors, and LOTS of water. Fortunately, most of this is a double of what is in my human pack, so it doesn't take up much space.

To touch on Linda's comment, it saddens me that someone would have such a negative experience with dogs on hiking trails as to want them banned completely. With any hike, but especially with dogs and children, it takes careful planning to insure that you have a good time in the backcountry. Personally, I have had nothing but positive comments while hiking with Taiga, who has been trained to only approach people or other dogs on command and to hike right behind me. If I am not sure that she will follow voice command, she remains leashed. I am always very careful to a: pack out any waste if possible, b: bury it or c: have her go at home before we leave so it isn't an issue. As a biologist, I would never want my animal to have a negative impact on the environment, both flora and fauna. That said, humans leave damage in their wake whenever another path is made up a mountain. Personally, I think it's an issue of balance. Be a responsible owner (which means sometimes leaving furry creatures at home), use leave-no-trace ethics, and respect other hikers and their wishes for a good experience. Thankfully our dogs are legally allowed on many trails, but keeping that privilege rests squarely in the hands of any dog owner that brings their animal into the backcountry.
Such things for example as the grasp of a child's hand in your own, the flavor of an apple, the embrace of a friend or lover...sunlight on rock and leaves, the feel of music, the bark of a tree, the abrasion of granite and sand, the plunge of clear water into a pool, the face of the wind--- what else is there? What else do we need?
--Edward Abbey

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby waolsen » Sun Aug 16, 2009 9:26 am

Snowgirl wrote:Wow, this thread did take an interesting turn.
Back to dog boots for a moment, someone mentioned that "some dog's feet are softer than others" from being indoors. This is a partial truth, however, it is important to note that rocks, especially scree rocks, can be quite sharp and could cut the pads or the delicate skin between the toes. Also, the surface of the pad can wear down over rough terrain as well, no matter how well conditioned they are to being outside. So whether or not you choose to have your dog wear booties, keep a close eye on their feet and have a plan for if your four-legged friend gets a cut or has sore feet. This also applies to dogs that do wear boots, because they can get rubs on their legs and tops of their toes. Just like a person with blisters, a dog with sore feet is not a happy one and you always want it to be a good experience for your dog as well as you. The same for dog packs, which can be used well or, in the case of an overweight Lab I saw hiking a (to remain anonymous) 14er, a hindrance and a health concern. As a general rule, if I'm going on a hike I bring a first-aid kit for me, and one for my dog that includes: hydration salts (mostly for the flavoring that it adds to the water, which encourages my dog to drink), vetwrap, cotton stretch bandaging, zinc oxide sunscreen (for her pink nose) 1/2 inch tape, antibiotic ointment, an instant ice pack, thermometer, bandage scissors, and LOTS of water. Fortunately, most of this is a double of what is in my human pack, so it doesn't take up much space.

To touch on Linda's comment, it saddens me that someone would have such a negative experience with dogs on hiking trails as to want them banned completely. With any hike, but especially with dogs and children, it takes careful planning to insure that you have a good time in the backcountry. Personally, I have had nothing but positive comments while hiking with Taiga, who has been trained to only approach people or other dogs on command and to hike right behind me. If I am not sure that she will follow voice command, she remains leashed. I am always very careful to a: pack out any waste if possible, b: bury it or c: have her go at home before we leave so it isn't an issue. As a biologist, I would never want my animal to have a negative impact on the environment, both flora and fauna. That said, humans leave damage in their wake whenever another path is made up a mountain. Personally, I think it's an issue of balance. Be a responsible owner (which means sometimes leaving furry creatures at home), use leave-no-trace ethics, and respect other hikers and their wishes for a good experience. Thankfully our dogs are legally allowed on many trails, but keeping that privilege rests squarely in the hands of any dog owner that brings their animal into the backcountry.


Thanks for all the great information. This is very helpful.

Regarding dogs on mountains, I have never had an issue with anyones pets. If your dog makes your experience more enjoyable than that is all that matters. As far as I can tell the dogs love it too.
"The mountains are calling and I must go"

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby msc118 » Sun Aug 16, 2009 11:52 am

Thanks, Snowgirl, for some great info. You mentioned hydration salts and I'm curious...do you use the same thing for your dog that you would for yourself? I love the idea of flavoring the water to encourage hydration. My dog is not usually interested in drinking unless she's dying, no matter how much I encourage her, so this is of great interest to me!

Thanks again to everyone that's posting good info, I appreciate it!

~Mindy
"Be very careful then, how you live, not as unwise but as wise, making the most of every opportunity." Ephesians 5:15-16

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby jrosie3 » Sun Aug 16, 2009 11:54 am

thats why I would never take my dog out into the backcountry. i love dogs, so I love seeing other dogs out there, as long as its not mine. I care too much about my dog to put her at that kind of risk

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby Snowgirl » Sun Aug 16, 2009 12:29 pm

The hydration salts are actually formulated for dogs, you can find them at REI. Dogs only sweat through the skin on the pads of their feet (which is another thing to keep in mind if you have boots a dog that's wearing boots) and tend to loose most of their heat through panting, so the effects of electrolyte formulas for dogs are a little controversial. However, everyone at my vet hospital agrees that if it makes the dog drink more (because they like the flavor) then that can't hurt. Many dogs will go 24/7 without stopping, so it's important to know your dog and how often they might need to drink.
Such things for example as the grasp of a child's hand in your own, the flavor of an apple, the embrace of a friend or lover...sunlight on rock and leaves, the feel of music, the bark of a tree, the abrasion of granite and sand, the plunge of clear water into a pool, the face of the wind--- what else is there? What else do we need?
--Edward Abbey

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby skiwall » Sun Aug 16, 2009 12:52 pm

That's really interesting... maybe I should try that. Once when my dog ate something bad and got really bad diarrhea (and was super dehydrated), I tried to give her a little bit of gatorade in her water (just a tiny little bit), and she wouldn't touch the stuff! I've tried since then, and she totally hates it. Maybe the dog stuff would appeal to her.

She does really like water, though, and I can give her water from my camelback. She'll come up and beg for water if she sees me drinking from it. It's cute. :)
"A good woman knows her place is in the backcountry." - PW '08

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby msc118 » Sun Aug 16, 2009 12:54 pm

jrosie3 wrote:thats why I would never take my dog out into the backcountry. i love dogs, so I love seeing other dogs out there, as long as its not mine. I care too much about my dog to put her at that kind of risk


Not sure if this response was in reference to my "dying" comment, but I was exaggerating...just wanted to clarify.
"Be very careful then, how you live, not as unwise but as wise, making the most of every opportunity." Ephesians 5:15-16

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby jrosie3 » Sun Aug 16, 2009 3:13 pm

oh, no. I was just saying that as a general statement refering to the main topic of this threat. sorry for the confusion

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby swoodyut » Fri Apr 01, 2011 3:57 pm

Sorry to revive an old thread, but I'm gearing up for my first hiking season with my new buddy Finegan. When Finn had a bad bought of diarrhea (during the coldest week of the year, of course; apartment living = no easy doggy door for me) and was refusing water, I found that offering chicken broth worked to get fluids into him. Perhaps chicken bullion cubes with salt could be a cheaper alternative to the rehydration salts.

Snowgirl, thanks for all the helpful information you've put out there on these forums w/r/t hiking & camping with dogs. I'm actually searching through your posts to gather all the nuggets.

Here's Finn:
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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby gearhunter » Fri Apr 01, 2011 10:11 pm

swoodyut wrote:When Finn had a bad bought of diarrhea (during the coldest week of the year


Same thing happened to me. After that I started every other day supplementation of pro-biotic powders in his food. He hasn't had diarrhea since.

I use this stuff: http://inclover.com/optagest_dogs.html which you'll have to get at a higher end pet store (ie: not Petsmart)

Feeding the dog a higher quality food will also dramatically reduce chances of digestive upset. (ie: Something that isn't Science Diet)

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby swoodyut » Sat Apr 02, 2011 9:14 am

gearhunter wrote:
swoodyut wrote:When Finn had a bad bought of diarrhea (during the coldest week of the year


Same thing happened to me. After that I started every other day supplementation of pro-biotic powders in his food. He hasn't had diarrhea since.

I use this stuff: http://inclover.com/optagest_dogs.html which you'll have to get at a higher end pet store (ie: not Petsmart)

Feeding the dog a higher quality food will also dramatically reduce chances of digestive upset. (ie: Something that isn't Science Diet)


The diarrhea was from a course of antibiotics he was on due to an infected wound. Didn't even dawn on me that dogs could get a flora imbalance from antibiotics too. I actually just supplement with a tablespoon or two of plain yogurt (homemade for myself, usually) every few days and that seems to work for him - he weighs around 23lbs. He's been on very high-quality food (I get from Quality Paws on SoBo) from day 1. I 100% agree about giving dogs non-crappy food, and am moving toward making his own food myself.... investigating going raw even. Guess I'm a bit of a DIY-er :).

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