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Dog Rescue

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby skiwall » Fri Aug 07, 2009 11:19 am

msc118 wrote: Other dog owners out there, do you use boots? For what kinds of hikes do you use them? All, or just the longer/rockier ones?


I use boots on my dog when skiing (they actually work kind of like snowshoes), running on super hot pavement, and mountain biking (we cover more distance faster, and it seems to be harder on her paws, especially if we have to use roads to connect trails). I've never used them while hiking, but I can't think of any hikes I've taken her on with really sharp rocks or anything. For general trails and mountains that aren't volcanic or something she's totally fine without them.
"A good woman knows her place is in the backcountry." - PW '08

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby Two Headed Boy » Fri Aug 07, 2009 11:34 am

I had a mutt that weighed about 90lbs and I took him up Sherman, at the top I checked his paws and decided to go over to Gemini and then Dyer. On the way down from Dyer he was a bloody mess and I had to carry him the rest of the way. I could only carry him about 50 feet at a time and then I had to rest. That day/night became one of my longest day/nights in the mountains I ever had.

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby djrunner » Fri Aug 07, 2009 4:20 pm

msc118 wrote:
Inky6900 wrote:Other dog owners out there, do you use boots? For what kinds of hikes do you use them? All, or just the longer/rockier ones?


I usually bring the boots, although I do not always need them. My dog runs on roads with me about 15-20 miles per week. His pads are fairly strong. However, at the tops of some peaks, it just gets rocky. Also, We have lost trails before and ended up on talus. It was nice to have the boots at that point. But, you are correct, with enough "training" the dog will be fine on some hikes. It really just depends on the distance and the terrain and the dog. However, I would recommend bringing boots on new hikes you are not familiar with. You just never know.

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby EatinHardtack » Fri Aug 07, 2009 8:46 pm

My pup has done about 20 14ers and I have yet to have her in boots. I do see some wear on her pads after about 25-30 miles of hiking over a few days and she usually needs a day to relax in between (as do I). I did take my dog skiing for the first time this year and saw her pads cut up a little from the corn snow conditions we had, if I do this again I will get her some boots for our descents.
"In our youths our hearts were touched with fire" - Oliver Wendell Holmes

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby Snowgirl » Wed Aug 12, 2009 4:07 pm

I have the Ruff Wear boots for my Bernie. I bought them for snow but they don't have great grip, so I use them mostly for hot sand/pavement (Great Sand Dunes NP, anyone?) and hiking. I definitely think she appreciated them on a recent trip up Quandry. The socks definitely help with rubbing, I pull them all the way up and then fold them over her boots to keep everything in place. One thing I recommend is to get some VetWrap and gauze and put it in your first aid kit. If your furry friend cuts their pad, you can make a quick bandage and hopefully save yourself from having to carry them down the mountain.
Attachments
5572_525705659635_15401086_31340121_5625577_n.jpg
You can see the fold-over technique at work with the socks over the top of the boot
5572_525705659635_15401086_31340121_5625577_n.jpg (91.08 KiB) Viewed 1698 times
Such things for example as the grasp of a child's hand in your own, the flavor of an apple, the embrace of a friend or lover...sunlight on rock and leaves, the feel of music, the bark of a tree, the abrasion of granite and sand, the plunge of clear water into a pool, the face of the wind--- what else is there? What else do we need?
--Edward Abbey

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby skiwall » Wed Aug 12, 2009 5:04 pm

Snowgirl wrote:I have the Ruff Wear boots for my Bernie. I bought them for snow but they don't have great grip, so I use them mostly for hot sand/pavement (Great Sand Dunes NP, anyone?) and hiking. I definitely think she appreciated them on a recent trip up Quandry. The socks definitely help with rubbing, I pull them all the way up and then fold them over her boots to keep everything in place. One thing I recommend is to get some VetWrap and gauze and put it in your first aid kit. If your furry friend cuts their pad, you can make a quick bandage and hopefully save yourself from having to carry them down the mountain.


Do you think socks or that Vet Wrap would help keep snow from getting stuck in the space between the dog's leg and the bootie at the top above the velcro? We got awesome booties (from a company that makes them for dog sledding), but sometimes we have to pick out the little pieces of ice that work their way into the cuff of the bootie. I guess the snow would still stick to the sock, but if it came up above the bootie, then maybe it wouldn't bug her so much? Thoughts?
"A good woman knows her place is in the backcountry." - PW '08

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby Snowgirl » Thu Aug 13, 2009 9:34 pm

Hmmm. I don't know how well Vetwrap would do with the snow because it tends to get soggy and not all that sticky when wet. I would think that your best bet for that might be Elastikon, which has a much stronger adhesive (just keep in mind that if the boots tend to slip around then the Elastikon will pull on the fur). The socks do provide a closer fit. I wonder what dog-sledders do for this problem? If you were to try the Elastikon (which is very durable, and great as an outer layer to a bandage) I would do a very short test-run in snow and see how it goes. Any skijorers/dogsledders out there that could weigh in?
Such things for example as the grasp of a child's hand in your own, the flavor of an apple, the embrace of a friend or lover...sunlight on rock and leaves, the feel of music, the bark of a tree, the abrasion of granite and sand, the plunge of clear water into a pool, the face of the wind--- what else is there? What else do we need?
--Edward Abbey

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby glacierPaul » Fri Aug 14, 2009 5:03 am

I have had the idea for years, to make doggy gaitors. They would have to be adaptable to all makes of dog shoes, or simply make the bootie and legging one piece, similar to knee high boots for us, only for dogs.
Paul

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby skiwall » Fri Aug 14, 2009 8:44 am

oohhhh! Doggy gaiters! That's a good idea, if I can keep them securely on. Maybe that will be a new summer project. :)
"A good woman knows her place is in the backcountry." - PW '08

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Re: Dog Rescue

Postby lodidodi » Fri Aug 14, 2009 8:45 am

why not just build the feet wider to act as snowshoes, or put spikes on them for crampons

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No more dogs in the backcountry!

Postby lindasmith » Fri Aug 14, 2009 9:22 am

Dogs in the backcountry, and on 14ers, are a nusiance. They chase the wildlife, make too much noise, sh*t all over, and insist on pushing their nose into my groin or licking my kids with their slobber. Please, please keep your dogs at home! You really can be alone, for a few hours, without your stupid pets!

Linda

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Re: No more dogs in the backcountry!

Postby Floyd » Fri Aug 14, 2009 9:25 am

lindasmith wrote:Dogs in the backcountry, and on 14ers, are a nusiance. They chase the wildlife, make too much noise, sh*t all over.

Linda


Same goes for many of the hikers I come across.

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