Forum
Buying gear? Please use these links to help 14ers.com:

More info...

Other ways to help...

13ers.com

Colorado 13er questions, conditions, and other info should be posted here. Also includes topics related to 13ers.com. 13er Trip Reports

Re: 13ers.com

Postby AndYouSeeMe » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:07 am

DJ,

While I usually agree with your posts, you are way off base in this thread I think. How you can make such blanket statements without actually climbing many of these horrible 13ers is beyond me. Sure Longs and the Needle are #1 and #2, they are popular 14ers. I would bet that if you asked those who have climbed the tough and awesome 13ers as well, those two 14ers would not be anywhere close to numbers 1 and 2. Just my opinion but you seem stuck in the 14er bubble, and trust me there is nothing wrong with that, I was there for years but never felt the need to rationalize and stick up for why the only thing I cared about was a peak over 14k, which you seem to be doing(poorly IMO).

Re: 13ers.com

Postby lordhelmut » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:10 am

djkest wrote:
lordhelmut wrote:I guess its a lose lose then, cause if you are worried about being obscure, go climb the standard routes on the 14ers and join the hordes. But if you enjoy doing something off the beaten path, you will be, in some way or another, branded a hipster. Hipsters and climbing are a bit of an antithesis, so its a moot point. Are you saying I personally insulted you because you consider yourself a hipster or is calling someone ignorant and narrow minded considered an insult?


Of course calling someone ignorant and narrow minded is an insult.

How's this: "13er enthusiasts, who enjoy (among other things) obscurity and solitude, could be compared to hipsters, who tend to enjoy obscure non-commercialized music, that goes overlooked by the majority of the population. Similarly, 13er enthusiasts enjoy mountains that go relatively un-noticed by the majority of hikers and climbers in Colorado". Hopefully that makes my point clear, but maybe not.


Well, that can make sense, but I personally, much to the displeasure of obscure enthusiasts (think Gore enthusiasts) write TR's of places off the beaten path to bring to light the appeal of those places. I'm not posting in a hipster-like fashion where I figure nobody knows what or where I'm talking about and that they aren't worthy of it. I'm showing simply that there is more to life after 14ers and the appeal of a little solitude. Old time Gore Enthusiasts would give me an earful when I posted Gore TR's cause they thought I would be letting the secret out. But in reality, those TR's might drive 10-20 more people there in a whole year, and a few of those might send me a message, showing gratitude for the heads up. Stuff like that is what makes this site and those TR's all the more worth it.

User avatar
Posts: 626
Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2011 6:41 pm
Location: waiting to see if my doom is impending

Re: 13ers.com

Postby DeucesWild » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:10 am

djkest wrote:Like above 14,000 feet?


There's nothing more valid and enlightening than a mostly uninformed opinion.
Snowflakes, Uber Alles!

www.deuceIRA.com. Put the Douche in your FiDeuceiary needs today!!

Online
User avatar
Posts: 1374
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 7:58 pm
Location: Colorado Springs

Re: 13ers.com

Postby djkest » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:17 am

AndYouSeeMe wrote:DJ,
While I usually agree with your posts, you are way off base in this thread I think. How you can make such blanket statements without actually climbing many of these horrible 13ers is beyond me. Sure Longs and the Needle are #1 and #2, they are popular 14ers. I would bet that if you asked those who have climbed the tough and awesome 13ers as well, those two 14ers would not be anywhere close to numbers 1 and 2. Just my opinion but you seem stuck in the 14er bubble, and trust me there is nothing wrong with that, I was there for years but never felt the need to rationalize and stick up for why the only thing I cared about was a peak over 14k, which you seem to be doing(poorly IMO).


Thanks for your comments. I will keep this in mind. I'm not sure specifically what blanket statements you are referring to, however.

DeucesWild wrote:
djkest wrote:Like above 14,000 feet?


There's nothing more valid and enlightening than a mostly uninformed opinion.


Pink font denotes sarcasm. It's a joke, not meant to be taken seriously. It was a play on the word "lofty".

lordhelmut wrote:edit : I just read your previous edited post. Just go and climb some more 13ers. Sounds like you had fun in the mummies, so I imagine you can have fun elsewhere.


Oh, I will be climbing 13ers for sure, once I am done with my first round on the 14ers. Many people start out on the 14ers as an introduction to mountaineering.
(The reason I edited it was to multi-quote)
I plan on eventually making my way to the highest 100. Although I'm worried about bi-centennials... that might be too much for my family life unless my kids start climbing too.
Last edited by djkest on Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
Life is a mountain, not a beach.
Exploring and Wine, my personal blog

User avatar
Posts: 1285
Joined: Wed May 02, 2007 9:06 pm
Location: Denver

Re: 13ers.com

Postby Papillon » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:23 am

Boggy B wrote:
nkan02 wrote:I really don't get this hoopla about 13ers. ...


-1 :!:

No offense, Nat. You aren't trolling right? It's true, there are lots of "boring" 13ers; I fix them by going in winter. As for the rest--the majority in my experience so far--of the 13ers, it's very easy to find scrambling, and trails! The worst bushwhack I've encountered so far this year was going up Harvard and Columbia from Frenchman Creek on Sunday.

Also you just said this:
nkan02 wrote:Bushwhacking sucks. Off-trailing sucks

And this:
nkan02 wrote:There is just nobody around if you are willing to step off a beaten path.


So which is it? :-s :P :lol:


This post is precisely why we all need to register for Paypal accounts and have Bill set up a "Buy me a Modus" button so instead of "liking" or "+1"-ing a post, you can slide a nice $0.99 somebody's way.

BoggyB, I owe you a pint for this.

This thread is turning into a similar thread from a few weeks back (I forgot the name) that can be summed up as follows:

Whatever I am doing is awesome and whatever everyone else is doing is s**t.
The look in his eyes when it hit - Kid, it was tasty... - William Seward Burroughs

User avatar
Posts: 1975
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 9:04 am
Location: Denver

Re: 13ers.com

Postby Presto » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:26 am

by Papillon » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:23 am

This post is precisely why we all need to register for Paypal accounts and have Bill set up a "Buy me a Modus" button so instead of "liking" or "+1"-ing a post, you can slide a nice $0.99 somebody's way.


\:D/ :iluvu: :iluvbeer: :iluvbeer: :iluvbeer: :bow:

"Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something." .... Plato :wink:
As if none of us have ever come back with a cool, quasi-epic story instead of being victim to tragic rockfall, a fatal stumble, a heart attack, an embolism, a lightning strike, a bear attack, collapsing cornice, some psycho with an axe, a falling tree, carbon monoxide, even falling asleep at the wheel getting to a mountain. If you can't accept the fact that sometimes "s**t happens", then you live with the illusion that your epic genius and profound wilderness intelligence has put you in total and complete control of yourself, your partners, and the mountain. How mystified you'll be when "s**t happens" to you! - FM

User avatar
Posts: 736
Joined: Sun Apr 30, 2006 10:29 am
Location: Centennial, CO

Re: 13ers.com

Postby benners » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:31 am

djkest wrote:How's this: "13er enthusiasts, who enjoy (among other things) obscurity and solitude, could be compared to hipsters, who tend to enjoy obscure non-commercialized music, that goes overlooked by the majority of the population. Similarly, 13er enthusiasts enjoy mountains that go relatively un-noticed by the majority of hikers and climbers in Colorado". Hopefully that makes my point clear, but maybe not.


After delving into the 14ers for a much longer period of time than I probably should have, and then transitioning to 13ers, I can honestly say I prefer 13ers. The reason for this isn't because 13ers are more obscure or overlooked by the majority, or because I'm making some form of "fashion statement" by hiking them, but simply because the 14ers got old after awhile and I wanted to go after something new and refreshing. The facts that 13ers are significantly less crowded and there is far less info on them are just bonuses, but both of those reasons for preferring 13ers to 14ers are completely legitimate. If you used to enjoy solitude and a small sense of pioneering mentality on 14ers which are now being literally overrun by the masses, it's only logical to part ways with them and look for an experience that more closely resembles that which you originally enjoyed about climbing peaks. In summer in Colorado in 2012, the only place this can be done is on the 13ers, unfortunately. The reasoning I listed above is not just unique to myself, but many others as well. I'd venture to guess that many people who now solely climb 13ers were once 14er fanatics that either got burned out, or the increase in 14er popularity Colorado has seen in the past several years has required them to adapt their interests, or both. That is, 13ers for most are much less about a fashion statement or pursuing the obscure for the sake of standing out as different, and much more about simply trying to find some solitude and sense of adventure in the mountains.

User avatar
Posts: 171
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 10:08 pm
Location: Denver

Re: 13ers.com

Postby wooderson » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:39 am

benners wrote:
djkest wrote:How's this: "13er enthusiasts, who enjoy (among other things) obscurity and solitude, could be compared to hipsters, who tend to enjoy obscure non-commercialized music, that goes overlooked by the majority of the population. Similarly, 13er enthusiasts enjoy mountains that go relatively un-noticed by the majority of hikers and climbers in Colorado". Hopefully that makes my point clear, but maybe not.


After delving into the 14ers for a much longer period of time than I probably should have, and then transitioning to 13ers, I can honestly say I prefer 13ers. The reason for this isn't because 13ers are more obscure or overlooked by the majority, or because I'm making some form of "fashion statement", but simply because the 14ers got old after awhile and I wanted to go after something new and refreshing. The fact that 13ers are significantly less crowded and there is far less info on them are just bonuses, but both of those reasons for preferring 13ers to 14ers are completely legitimate. If you used to enjoy solitude and a small sense of pioneering mentality on 14ers which are now being literally overrun by the masses, it's only logical to part ways with them and look for an experience that more closely resembles that which you originally enjoyed about climbing peaks. In summer in Colorado in 2012, the only place this can be done is on the 13ers, unfortunately. The reasoning I listed above is not just unique to myself, but many others as well. I'd venture to guess that many people who now solely climb 13ers were once 14er fanatics, and the increase in popularity Colorado has seen in the past several years has required them to adapt their interests. That is, 13ers for most are much less about a fashion statement or liking the obscure for the sake of standing out as different, and much more about simply trying to find some solitude and sense of adventure in the mountains.


Great post, Ben, and a sound debunking of the "hipster" theory I'd say.

Speaking of hipster, I decided to do a bit of research on the term and stumbled upon this definition from Jack Kerouac, ca. 1944:

"Rising and roaming America, bumming and hitchhiking everywhere, characters of a special spirituality."

If we go by this definition, I wouldn't mind being part of this camp. :wink:

Online
User avatar
Posts: 1374
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 7:58 pm
Location: Colorado Springs

Re: 13ers.com

Postby djkest » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:41 am

Well said benners. I agree that adventure and solitude are both worthwhile pursuits, and as my trip report on Grays and Torreys indicates, there wasn't much of either to be had that day. My blog is called "EXPLORING and wine"- although exploring is relative because going somewhere YOU haven't been before is exploring in some ways.

I'm not a big fan of large crowds. But- this year-
San Luis Peak, Mt. Yale, Crestone Peak, Challenger Point, Blanca Peak, Kit Carson Peak, Mt. Sneffels- we had the summits of these and more to ourselves. Just depends when you go, when you start, and how long it takes you.
Life is a mountain, not a beach.
Exploring and Wine, my personal blog

Re: 13ers.com

Postby lordhelmut » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:47 am

wooderson wrote:
benners wrote:
djkest wrote:How's this: "13er enthusiasts, who enjoy (among other things) obscurity and solitude, could be compared to hipsters, who tend to enjoy obscure non-commercialized music, that goes overlooked by the majority of the population. Similarly, 13er enthusiasts enjoy mountains that go relatively un-noticed by the majority of hikers and climbers in Colorado". Hopefully that makes my point clear, but maybe not.


After delving into the 14ers for a much longer period of time than I probably should have, and then transitioning to 13ers, I can honestly say I prefer 13ers. The reason for this isn't because 13ers are more obscure or overlooked by the majority, or because I'm making some form of "fashion statement", but simply because the 14ers got old after awhile and I wanted to go after something new and refreshing. The fact that 13ers are significantly less crowded and there is far less info on them are just bonuses, but both of those reasons for preferring 13ers to 14ers are completely legitimate. If you used to enjoy solitude and a small sense of pioneering mentality on 14ers which are now being literally overrun by the masses, it's only logical to part ways with them and look for an experience that more closely resembles that which you originally enjoyed about climbing peaks. In summer in Colorado in 2012, the only place this can be done is on the 13ers, unfortunately. The reasoning I listed above is not just unique to myself, but many others as well. I'd venture to guess that many people who now solely climb 13ers were once 14er fanatics, and the increase in popularity Colorado has seen in the past several years has required them to adapt their interests. That is, 13ers for most are much less about a fashion statement or liking the obscure for the sake of standing out as different, and much more about simply trying to find some solitude and sense of adventure in the mountains.


Great post, Ben, and a sound debunking of the "hipster" theory I'd say.

Speaking of hipster, I decided to do a bit of research on the term and stumbled upon this definition from Jack Kerouac, ca. 1944:

"Rising and roaming America, bumming and hitchhiking everywhere, characters of a special spirituality."

If we go by this definition, I wouldn't mind being part of this camp. :wink:


Woody -

Not a bad quote. Too bad the modern day version has veered a little from what Jack was referring to :

Image

I don't think this guy climbs mountains, regardless of its height.

Re: 13ers.com

Postby AndYouSeeMe » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:47 am

Ben, that was the perfect post. It stated exactly how I feel but am not eloquent enough to put into words myself, well done! =D>

And Sarah, if that is the definition we are going by I would be happy to be called a hipster as well(NEVER thought I would say that!) :)

User avatar
Posts: 736
Joined: Sun Apr 30, 2006 10:29 am
Location: Centennial, CO

Re: 13ers.com

Postby benners » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:56 am

djkest wrote:Well said benners. I agree that adventure and solitude are both worthwhile pursuits, and as my trip report on Grays and Torreys indicates, there wasn't much of either to be had that day. My blog is called "EXPLORING and wine"- although exploring is relative because going somewhere YOU haven't been before is exploring in some ways.

I'm not a big fan of large crowds. But- this year-
San Luis Peak, Mt. Yale, Crestone Peak, Challenger Point, Blanca Peak, Kit Carson Peak, Mt. Sneffels- we had the summits of these and more to ourselves. Just depends when you go, when you start, and how long it takes you.


Definitely, I agree. You can absolutely still find solitude on 14er summits (though I'd argue as time passes the odds of doing so are getting smaller), especially in the winter/spring months. The primary reason I stopped doing 14ers is the first I wrote above, and that is simply that I'm sick of them! For a loooooong time they were all I hiked. I will admit I had 14er tunnel vision, and so I can't and don't fault others for having that same mindset now. Like you said something that's new to you should be considered exploring from your own perspective, and there are many great routes on 14ers.

PreviousNext

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: AlexeyD and 14 guests