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Eating and combating nausea on the trails

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Postby bustaheel » Sun Sep 30, 2007 10:45 am

Try bringing some candied ginger. Ginger is very good for nausea. Helps me avoid sea sickness.
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Postby Couloirman » Sun Sep 30, 2007 11:31 am

bustaheel wrote:Ginger is very good for nausea. Helps me avoid sea sickness.


Im pretty sure the Mythbusters debunked that myth. I mean, TV couldn't ever lie to us could they???
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Postby highaltmama » Sun Sep 30, 2007 12:25 pm

Aspirin did seem to help on my last hike, and PBJ's are supposed to be good too, so I'm told. All I can ever seem to choke down during the hike is about 4 Snickers mini bites, especially at the summit.

Curious about the Tums with the aspirin. Read the post about being two different kinds of drugs. Can you take them together or should it be done separately, like an hour or two apart for them to work best?
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Postby Matt » Sun Sep 30, 2007 12:33 pm

Tums have no significant effect on Aspirin, other than to minimize any stomach irritation if you take a non-enteric coated aspirin tab.
BTW:
Q. Who should NOT take aspirin?

A. Generally, people who have:
allergy to aspirin or other salicylates
asthma
uncontrolled high blood pressure
severe liver or kidney disease
bleeding disorders
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Postby bustaheel » Sun Sep 30, 2007 1:37 pm

Couloirman wrote:
bustaheel wrote:Ginger is very good for nausea. Helps me avoid sea sickness.


Im pretty sure the Mythbusters debunked that myth. I mean, TV couldn't ever lie to us could they???


I knew somebody would say something about Mythbusters I thought that is one that they confirmed.

At least in my experience it seemed to have worked.
Probably nowhere but in Boulder would one encounter strippers who spend there vacations trekking in Nepal.

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Postby Couloirman » Sun Sep 30, 2007 4:10 pm

bustaheel wrote:
Couloirman wrote:
bustaheel wrote:Ginger is very good for nausea. Helps me avoid sea sickness.


Im pretty sure the Mythbusters debunked that myth. I mean, TV couldn't ever lie to us could they???


I knew somebody would say something about Mythbusters I thought that is one that they confirmed.

At least in my experience it seemed to have worked.



Yeah, no doubt. Im not saying I dont think it works for you, its all personal. Im pretty sure the mythbusters one was on the sea sickness episode, and it made Jamie have a longer period of tolerance on the boat before vomiting, but he definitley puked both times. Either way though, if it works for you, keep doing it.
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Postby jasper9890 » Mon Oct 01, 2007 9:40 pm

Do you only feel sick when you're at higher elevations? Have you done the same sort of length or strenuous hikes at lower elevations with the same or different results? That'll help figure out if it's your nutrition in general or not. I would think it's either more water or an electrolyte mix/drink that you need.

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Postby mrburns » Mon Oct 01, 2007 11:14 pm

I have had the same problem, I have started taking two aleve before the hike and I find that some yogurt in the morning before the hike seems to help. I don't know if the yogurt has anything to do with it, or if it just getting something in my stomach makes the difference.

I also think that a 32oz Gatorade dumped in my 100oz bladder filled the rest of the way with water helps.
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Postby elims » Mon Oct 01, 2007 11:57 pm

The only time I've felt nauseous is when I haven't eaten before. then again, I always get a few hundred calories into me during the hike either with trail mix, gel shots or shot blocks. and I love a bag of smoked salmon for the summit. I still felt ill on the one hike I did without at least eating a little before starting(but also was very physically active the 24 hours prior, didn't eat a good dinner and didn't really hydrate the night before).

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Postby bcitsthere » Tue Oct 02, 2007 8:24 am

don't take advil, aspirin, tums or whatever. that only alleviates the symptoms and does not solve the problem. the problem is probably a lack of proper hydration or proper nutrients. here are a couple of things you can try, but you will need to experiment around and finding what works best for you.

1) prepare beforehand. 24 hours before keep yourself well hydrated. drink about 2 liters of water in a day. you can try more and less amount of water to see what works best. too much water may be bad as it will dilute electrolytes in your system (sodium, potassium and such). there are many different drinks such as gatorade or various powders to mix in with water that contain electrolytes. check the label for sodium potassium and various vitamins, dont get something that has sugar and flavor only. try different ones and find what you like.

2) along with drinking well, eat well. carbo loading the night before is a good idea. lots of pasta combined with protein (60% carb 30% protein 10% fat (not saturated fat) is a good ratio) also eat well right before the hike. have a good breakfast high in protein and low in fat (greasy bacon and eggs are bad! it takes too long for your body to break down the complex fats) a quick snack 15 min before is also a good idea as your body will be getting the energy from the snack right as you start.

3) continue to eat and drink during the hike. you should drink about 2 liters of fluid through a day long hike, and even more if it is a particularly strenuous hike. some people may need more water, but this is something you need to try yourself, and remember electrolytes, maybe one 16oz bottle of gatorade or such somewhere in the mix. camel backs are good for hiking because you can drink and continue to hike. people tend to drink more when they do this just out of convenience. but keep drinking. if you feel thirsty, then your body is already becoming dehydrated. you should keep drinking so you dont get to the point of feeling very thirsty. bring snacks you like to eat. i like various energy bars. some people like trail mix. bring what you like, because if you dont like the food, then you wont eat it!

4) if you want to get really into it you can start counting calories. you will use about 400 calories an hour or more on a hike. some of this should be eaten before, some during and some after. i thought this was bs until i started counting calories then found i was about 500 short in the span of a day. when i increased my caloric intake my energy shot up and i generally felt better during and after a long hike (or bike ride).

some of this may be a bit overkill. i do all of the above because i am a road biker and will go on rides of 80+ miles. so when i go on a hike i find i need to maintain the same diet. but try different parts (mostly the eat and drink more part before you start to feel bad) and see what works for you.

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Postby ILoveLhotse » Tue Oct 02, 2007 8:38 am

Delta 9 Tetrahydrocannabinol :D Works for chemo nausea, should work for you, too. I don't recommend it for anything harder than Class 2 though...
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Postby icenrock » Tue Oct 02, 2007 9:27 am

ILoveLhotse wrote:Delta 9 Tetrahydrocannabinol :D Works for chemo nausea, should work for you, too. I don't recommend it for anything harder than Class 2 though...
8) [-X


Now thats funny!! I would agree on staying away from any class3 + stuff though,, On a serious note: I agree with an asprin and a stomach settler of your choice, I usualy take an asprin in route to the hike/climb and and then something for the tummy at the start of the hike. Try some PB&J sandwiches, hydrate well the night before and durring, and feed that tummy! you may be supprissed at how much better ya feel if your not hungry.....
"hummmm... is that ice screw suppossed to do that....

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