Forum
Buying gear? Please use these links to help 14ers.com:

More info...

Other ways to help...

GPS--Most User Friendly?

Info on gear, conditioning, and preparation for hiking/climbing. Gear Classifieds
Posts: 546
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2009 11:08 pm

GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby steelfrog » Thu Sep 12, 2013 9:27 am

So, someone gave me the Garmin; I think a 610S? a pretty good one; I got the maps and loaded them on etc. Still couldn't really figure out how to use the dang thing. Small screen, etc etc. So, I gave it to someone else I thought could use it. I am not tech-savy. Is there any product out three now that is GPS-based that is user friendly?

User avatar
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Mar 22, 2013 11:38 am
Location: Lake Ozark, MO

Re: GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby Klinger1986 » Thu Sep 12, 2013 2:44 pm

I own the Garmin 62st. I would not consider myself tech savvy, and I can still use it. I basically just clicked every button until I figured out how to work it. If you are use to traditional car GPS's, then there is a learning curve. I have played around with the Garmin Oregon series, and it is similar to their Car GPS's. I would say that the Oregon is the easiest to use. There are some drawbacks. The reception on the Oregon is not as good as the Garmin 62 and in cold temps the touchscreen is not the best. I love my Garmin 62st. It was expensive, but I love all the data that it produces.
Last edited by Klinger1986 on Fri Sep 13, 2013 3:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.” -Dr. Seuss

User avatar
Posts: 1217
Joined: Wed Jun 16, 2010 2:33 pm
Location: Crestone, CO and/or Chapel Hill, NC

Re: GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby jdorje » Thu Sep 12, 2013 2:49 pm

Android backcountry navigator demo - or any of several other smart phone apps. If you are not familiar with gps this is a good place to start.

Posts: 546
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2009 11:08 pm

Re: GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby steelfrog » Fri Sep 13, 2013 6:44 am

Yes but it is not satellite based? I have I phone 5 and a program called Motion gps bug it doesn't work without cell coverage.

Harmon Oregon sounds worth a try?

Re: GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby forbins_mtn » Fri Sep 13, 2013 7:17 am

I got an Oregon 450 for Christmas last year and I'm still figuring it out. The manual is useless. Basically tells you where to put the batteries and how to turn it on. But, overall it's not that hard - it's just frustrating to know that it has capabilities but no idea how to utilize them

Posts: 2136
Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2009 4:19 pm

Re: GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby peter303 » Fri Sep 13, 2013 7:29 am

jdorje wrote:Android backcountry navigator demo - or any of several other smart phone apps. If you are not familiar with gps this is a good place to start.

The dedicated GPS machines batteries last days, not hours.

Posts: 546
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2009 11:08 pm

Re: GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby steelfrog » Fri Sep 13, 2013 7:41 am

So is the Oregon more user friendly than the 61st?

Posts: 546
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2009 11:08 pm

Re: GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby steelfrog » Fri Sep 13, 2013 8:15 am

OK I have researched this now and it seems possibly the best one would be the Oregon 650 because of the increased memory, includes the battery pack and the built in camera with geotagging.

User avatar
Posts: 1217
Joined: Wed Jun 16, 2010 2:33 pm
Location: Crestone, CO and/or Chapel Hill, NC

Re: GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby jdorje » Fri Sep 13, 2013 8:23 am

A smartphone gps works just the same as any other gps, based on satellite pings. They work just fine without cell coverage.

User avatar
Posts: 1103
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 9:32 am
Location: Englewood, CO

Re: GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby Derek » Fri Sep 13, 2013 10:19 am

Used an Oregon for a while now. 4 years-ish?

I think its pretty easy to figure out, especially compared to others I have had. As mentioned, there was no real manual, but with the big 'ol icons, its quite easy.

Battery: The battery (in my view) is great. I use a standard energizer rechargables (not a special kind at all) and a set will last me two full day-trips on average...even in winter. A set in the GPS and a extra set in the pack has lasted all my backpack trips up to 3 days easily. Its crazy, but I'm still using some sets that I originally bought back when I got the GPS! Can't even imagine how many cycles they've been through.

Reception: Excellent. And I have an old version, so Im sure its improved even more since. Had it on +/- 200 summits, many many miles and have lost reception exactly twice. Once in a cave in the LCW (obviously) and once on Mount Glennon just outside Denver. I'm assuming that was a fluke, and it fixed itself within a matter of minutes and never happened again. Sometimes it takes a while to lock on once you turn it on for the first time in a new area, but nothing terrible.

If mine dies (knock on wood - but I have put it through hell) I'd buy another Oregon.

--D
"I used to think my Dad was Elvis. But I haven't told him that yet. I haven't told my Dad either." -S. Murdoch
LOJ

User avatar
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Mar 22, 2013 11:38 am
Location: Lake Ozark, MO

Re: GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby Klinger1986 » Fri Sep 13, 2013 3:23 pm

jdorje wrote:A smartphone gps works just the same as any other gps, based on satellite pings. They work just fine without cell coverage.


Does it eat up your data, or is it based on something totally different?
“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.” -Dr. Seuss

User avatar
Posts: 1217
Joined: Wed Jun 16, 2010 2:33 pm
Location: Crestone, CO and/or Chapel Hill, NC

Re: GPS--Most User Friendly?

Postby jdorje » Fri Sep 13, 2013 3:38 pm

I use it in airplane mode, though if you have signal it can on theory use agps features. You might want to read about how gps works...the gps receiver is not a transmitter.

There are downsides. The biggest one is the cost of the smartphone.

Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: fahixson, spect and 23 guests