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Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

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Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby djkest » Thu Sep 12, 2013 2:44 pm

winmag4582001 wrote:Son, I grew up in southern Iowa thinking that a 3/4 ton Chevy, 454 with 32's was the roughest toughest vehicle on earth.

:roll:
Whatever "pops". I grew up in Colorado.
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Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby EDollar » Fri Sep 13, 2013 4:07 pm

Klinger1986 wrote:I'm not sure if this is the appropriate thread for this question, but a vehicle could be considered gear. Anyway, does anyone have experience with the Jeep Trailhawk? I am looking around for a new vehicle that has the comfort of an SUV, but still handles rough roads decently. I would just go for the Jeep Wrangler, but I can't justify the purchase considering I don't live in the Rockies. I do a decent amount of hiking every year, which requires traversing some nasty roads, but the majority of my driving is on quality roads. The Trailhawk seems to have decent off-road capabilities, while still maintaing the SUV feel. Any and all help is appreciated. Also, if you have any other vehicle suggestions, I would be open to that.


I don't knock other vehicles and I'm not a brand snob. They all serve their intended purpose. But, one can't compare a Forester to an Xterra to a Rubicon to a Land Cruiser. You said "new vehicle". If you truly meant new, then get ready to spend $80K for a Land Cruiser.

Once you narrow down your budget or what you're willing to spend, then you can narrow down your selection. From what I've seen, the new Cherokee Trailhawk can top out at $40K, fully optioned out. There is no new Grand Cherokee Trailhawk just yet. The Trailhawk 2 picture that TallGrass posted is their concept and has enlarged fender wells and 35's. I don't know when they will release it, but it shouldn't be too different, with regular flares and obviously smaller tires. As for the Cherokee Trailhawk, it hasn't hit the streets just yet, so there are no real world tests, aside from the typical C&D, Edmunds, etc. test drives. No one here can give you an honest, first hand opinion on a vehicle that isn't out yet.

Of the vehicles mentioned so far that I have actual first hand knowledge about, the Xterra and Grand Cherokee would fit the bill just fine. The Jeep is more refined and leans more toward the luxury side. The Xterra has a solid rear and more options for modifications (i.e. bumpers, lifts, etc.). Big price different too. And the Wrangler. Well, you can't always put a price on the ability to take the top off. You don't have to live in the Rockies to enjoy the open air. Subaru's makes some nice vehicles and will do well on dirt roads, if that's what you consider off road.

My ex Pro-4X:

Image

My Grand Cherokee Overland:

Image

My Rubicon:

Image


If you have any specific questions about these, feel free to ask.

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Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby jimmtman » Fri Sep 13, 2013 8:31 pm

Interesting thread - I'm thinking about replacing my old Explorer with something that can get to all 14er trailheads. I'm really enamored with with Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon. The press calls it the most capable stock off road vehicle and it is pretty cool to take the doors and top off. For those who have done the Blanca group it is so much better to drive to 10k instead of parking down at 8k or even 8.8k and not abusing the car too much. Thanks for mentioning the Xterra Pro-4X - it is worth checking out. But I just don't see myself in a Forrester or Outback - perhaps driving on I-70 to go skiing but not off road.

It seems like the Wrangler has improved its quality because 1) they are in tremendous demand (and that wouldn't be logical if they were lemons) and 2) they have very high resale value - many for sale with 100-200 kmiles on them - still running strong. I'd be interested in hearing more about those who own newer Jeeps specifically the Wrangler if there has been any problems with them.

Thanks,

Jim

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Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby Klinger1986 » Sat Sep 14, 2013 10:09 am

EDollar wrote:
Klinger1986 wrote:I'm not sure if this is the appropriate thread for this question, but a vehicle could be considered gear. Anyway, does anyone have experience with the Jeep Trailhawk? I am looking around for a new vehicle that has the comfort of an SUV, but still handles rough roads decently. I would just go for the Jeep Wrangler, but I can't justify the purchase considering I don't live in the Rockies. I do a decent amount of hiking every year, which requires traversing some nasty roads, but the majority of my driving is on quality roads. The Trailhawk seems to have decent off-road capabilities, while still maintaing the SUV feel. Any and all help is appreciated. Also, if you have any other vehicle suggestions, I would be open to that.


I don't knock other vehicles and I'm not a brand snob. They all serve their intended purpose. But, one can't compare a Forester to an Xterra to a Rubicon to a Land Cruiser. You said "new vehicle". If you truly meant new, then get ready to spend $80K for a Land Cruiser.

Once you narrow down your budget or what you're willing to spend, then you can narrow down your selection.


I would say my top priorities are performance(on/off road), MPG, and reliability. I guess I could throw cost in there also. I don't want to spend over 40k, but anything cheaper is obviously GREAT news :-D. After reading through everyones posts, I think I am down to two options. The Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk(not GC) or the Xterra Pro-4x. They both seem to be equal in reliability and off-road performance.(I would't mind hearing some opinions on off road capabilities of both these vehicles) I understand that the Cherokee Trailhawk has not been released yet, but I still would like to hear your opinions. So, I guess that leaves MPG.

After doing some Math this is what I have come up with:

Cherokee Trailhawk

Fully loaded price:$37,065
Avg MPG:26mpg
Avg gas price:$3.60
Life-time mileage:150,000
Lift-time gas consumption:$20,769
Life-time cost:$57,834

Xterra Pro-4x

Fully loaded price:$32,161
Avg MPG:18mpg
Avg gas price:$3.60
Life-time mileage:150,000
Lift-time gas consumption:$30,000
Life-time cost:$62,161

I know there are many more variables in this equation, but this is just a rough estimate. The final difference in savings, between the two, is $4,327. I also noticed that the Jeep has many more comfort features than the Xterra. In fact, the starting price of the Trailhawk is only $1,050 more than the Xterra Pro-4x. So, if you go with base model of both, then the savings difference is $8,181. Oddly enough, the Jeep wins in the price category. So which one is more expensive to maintain? That would be my next question. Also, can these vehicles be compared, or is one clearly superior to the other?
“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.” -Dr. Seuss

Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby its_not_a_tuba » Sat Sep 14, 2013 3:10 pm

One thing to think about is that the Pro4x includes a locking rear differential which I believe the Trailhawk does not, a rear locker makes a world of difference off road. I chose my Xterra primarily because it does not have a ton of unnecessary bells and whistles that are expensive to maintain when they break. Quadra-Lift sounds nice at the dealership but you won't like it so much when it comes time to replace your shocks.
"Wilderness settles peace on the soul because it needs no help. It is beyond human contrivance." -- E.O. Wilson

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Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby shearmodulus » Sat Sep 14, 2013 9:50 pm

As a hardcore four-wheeler, I cannot over-state the value of locking differentials to trail performance.

Most 4-wheel drive cars are not actually "four-wheel drive," they are "one wheel spins in the front and one wheel spins in the back," because even though they have a transfer case to put power to the front axles, they still use some form of automatic locker or limited slip differential. A selectable locker allows you to lock both sides of an axle together for true traction, and then unlock them when you're out of the conditions you needed it for because driving even on a heavy gravel road or trail is a beeeyotch with a front locker engaged.

The VAST majority of "4-wheel" or "all-wheel" drive vehicles do not come with lockers. Rubicons are one f the few exceptions.

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Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby SuperiorTrailHiker » Sun Sep 15, 2013 12:28 am

jimmtman wrote: I'd be interested in hearing more about those who own newer Jeeps specifically the Wrangler if there has been any problems with them.




I have a 2010 Wrangler Sport JK, the 4-door model. 80K on it so far, zero problems. And surprisingly, if the onboard computer can be trusted, I average 19.2 MPG with it.

I posted earlier about still looking at it when it's parked - I've wanted a Wrangler since I could drive, so I am not the most unbiased responder, but I utterly love it.

I have not pushed the performance envelope with it, but it got around some very low maintenance tracks in Colorado without breaking a sweat, and has gotten me into some serious backcountry in northern Minnesota in January. It's not a Rubicon, but it's got more capability than I will ever need.

And as mentioned - you can take the top and doors off of it. There's just nothing wrong with that at all.

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Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby Roald » Sun Sep 15, 2013 6:57 am

jimmtman wrote:For those who have done the Blanca group it is so much better to drive to 10k instead of parking down at 8k or even 8.8k and not abusing the car too much.


Completely agree. Going up to 10,100 saved more than 2 miles of walking each way on that miserable road. Never hurt my Cherokee, and it was fun seeing how far up I could get.
chrismjx wrote:

Roald, in that one sentence you managed to demonstrate that A) you're an idiot and B) you're a hypocrite, and a perfect example of the cause of the modern-day problems in this country.

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Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby TallGrass » Sun Sep 15, 2013 11:40 am

shearmodulus wrote:As a hardcore four-wheeler, I cannot over-state the value of locking differentials to trail performance.
What about a TorSen rear instead?
Not sure if I'll do more 14ers. The trip reports are too tiring. :wink:

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Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby TomPierce » Sun Sep 15, 2013 11:58 am

Klinger: I'd also toss a Toyota 4Runner Trail Edition into the mix. It's a 4Runner, but the off road version with more ground clearance, a locking differential, crawl control, a kinetic suspension (decouples for more wheel travel), skid plates, etc. Toyota reliability. I made it up to 10,100' on the Como road with no drama, and stopped there only because the stock skid plates were sort of lame. I've since remedied that with fuller coverage 3/16" stainless steel plates, and bumped up the tires one size to all-terrain tires that give a shade more ground clearance and are a tad wider with better rubber and tread. But it still doesn't look too "off roady;" it's my daily driver and even my wife will occasionally drive it. :lol:

The Jeep you mentioned initially in your post looks far better than the Liberty, but some warning signs emerged when I looked at some reviews. Jeeps have usually scored poorly in Consumer Report and other reviews for reliability. Fully agree with shearmodulus that a locking rear diff is a must-have, and the ground clearance of the Jeep and stock tire size (the review I saw didn't mention 33's) were underwhelming. Finally, note that IMO the phrase "skid plates" means almost nothing; they could be fuller coverage hard core plates and you're good to go. Alternatively they could be partial coverage sheet metal plates that will be seriously dented and possibly ripped after a few sporty outings. As always, just my opinions.

Good luck with your shopping!

-Tom

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Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby TallGrass » Sun Sep 15, 2013 2:29 pm

stateside wrote:
TallGrass wrote: What about a TorSen rear instead?
Its still a limited slip dif.
No. It is not. Look it up.
Both "worm" gears have to be moving or it's locked, unlike LS which common uses cones or clutch packs.
Not sure if I'll do more 14ers. The trip reports are too tiring. :wink:

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Re: Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk

Postby Klinger1986 » Sun Sep 15, 2013 5:41 pm

So does the Trailhawk have locking differentials? It sounds like it does, but I might be mistaken.

http://jeremysaysyes.com/dealer/2014-jeep-cherokee-trailhawk-v-6-4x4-driven-the-small-crossover-with-the-big-name/#comments

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