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Trekking poles as carry on

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Trekking poles as carry on

Postby JsinDeAZ » Tue Aug 27, 2013 10:32 am

I couldn't find this topic with the search. My google search turned up a hodge podge of answers. So, does anyone have experience taking their collapsed trekking poles through airport security in a carry on bag (recently, since Apr 25 change to rules)? From what I'm reading, it looks like it was more of an issue in the past, but has been removed. Any firsthand experience would be greatly appreciated.

Gracias,
jsin
-----------------------------
I only went out for a walk and finally concluded to stay out till sundown, for going out, I found, was really going in. - John Muir

...I love not man the less, but Nature more... - Lord Byron

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Re: Trekking poles as carry on

Postby dnye » Tue Aug 27, 2013 10:35 am

I am wrong #-o
Last edited by dnye on Tue Aug 27, 2013 1:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Trekking poles as carry on

Postby pbakwin » Tue Aug 27, 2013 10:49 am

The TSA wanted to allow poles and some other sports equipment as carry on, but the flight attendants objected & so the rule was not changed. Poles are not allowed, though you might get through security with them. Or not.

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Re: Trekking poles as carry on

Postby Wilderness_hike » Tue Aug 27, 2013 10:52 am

According to this site the April 25th changes were scrapped:

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/national_world/2013/06/06/tsa-chief-reconsiders-scraps-new-knife-rule.html

The TSA website also has ski poles listed as a non carry-on item, and I'm pretty sure most TSA agents would view trekking poles as ski poles.

http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/prohibited-items

No first hand experience, but based upon this I would be surprised if they let you on with trekking poles.

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Re: Trekking poles as carry on

Postby Bill Cummings » Tue Aug 27, 2013 11:10 am

Slightly off-topic, but this may help some fellow travelers: I recently got in a minor urinating contest with the TSA screening agents at BWI (Baltimore). They insisted I give up my very small nylon wallet (which has all my ID, credit cards, money, etc.) and put it in one of the x-ray bins. I've never had to do this before and refused--I consider this too much of a theft risk risk. After some tense back-and-forth, the solution we hit on: They were content to let me hold on to my cards and money and go through the body scanner, as long as I put the wallet in the x-ray bin. Problem solved!
Bill "Blind Willie" Cummings

"God loves you just the way you are. But He loves you way too much to let you stay that way." --"Junebug"
"You can't argue with the truth when it comes up and bites you on the buttocks." --Peter Lang

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Re: Trekking poles as carry on

Postby Bullwinkle » Tue Aug 27, 2013 12:41 pm

No can do. Just went through DIA last weekend. I usually check a bag and carry my pack, sans prohibited items. I forgot to move my mini swiss knife to my checked bag, and even though those are supposedly now allowed, I was advised that they are not allowed yet. Also took my small magnesium fire starter at DIA, though that passed on the way in. Matches should pass, so long as they are not "strike anywhere".

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Re: Trekking poles as carry on

Postby tlongpine » Tue Aug 27, 2013 1:03 pm

I don't know what the rules say, but the gate agents at Frontier wouldn't allow trekking poles as carry-ons.
I am unable to walk away from the mountain without climbing it. An unclimbed mountain tugs at my consciousness with the eternal weight of time itself. Until I've pressed my face into it's alpine winds, hugged it's ancient granite walls, and put it's weathered summit beneath my heal I'm unable to resist it's attraction.Knowing nature gives the mountain more time than she gives us adds urgency to the obsession. As has been said before; the mountain doesn't care.

It can wait forever. I cannot.

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Re: Trekking poles as carry on

Postby highpilgrim » Tue Aug 27, 2013 1:07 pm

tlongpine wrote:I don't know what the rules say, but the gate agents at Frontier wouldn't allow trekking poles as carry-ons.


Nor would Southwest. And, for the first time they made me sign a waiver to attach them to the outside of my North Face duffel bag. That had never happened before.

I think there is a discretionary piece to this discussion; catch the check-in person on a bad day and they can prevent you from carrying a number of things that others might allow.

I make sure I pack anything I don't want to lose...
Call on God, but row away from the rocks.
Hunter S Thompson

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Re: Trekking poles as carry on

Postby MountainHiker » Tue Aug 27, 2013 3:30 pm

A long metal stick with a pointed end going through security? When 9-11 was achieved with box cutters?

I’ve had the same flack holding on to my wallet and passport. That BS seemed to come along with the magic body scanners. I hold my wallet and passport in my hand when I get scanned. After giving me crap they then rifle through my wallet. I had a stare off after one guy gave me crap, and I pointed out if my wallet and passport get lost I’m f**ked.

But “Scissors - metal with pointed tips and blades shorter than 4 inches are allowed, but blades longer than 4 inches are prohibited”

There are inconsistencies at best with this security theatre.

http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/prohibited-items

Item Carry-on? Checked?
Baseball Bats NO OK
Bows and Arrows NO OK
Cricket Bats NO OK
Golf Clubs NO OK
Hockey Sticks NO OK
Lacrosse Sticks NO OK
Pool Cues NO OK
Skates (including ice skates and rollerblades) OK OK
Ski Poles NO OK
Spear Guns NO OK
Red, Rugged, and Rotten: The Elk Range - Borneman & Lampert

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Re: Trekking poles as carry on

Postby mountaingoat-G » Wed Aug 28, 2013 9:16 am

Does anyone really think you can hijack a plane with a ski pole ????

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Re: Trekking poles as carry on

Postby Derby Ale » Wed Aug 28, 2013 11:03 am

Does anyone even think you could hijack a plane with box cutters anymore? The only reason it worked then was because no one ever imagined the plan was crash the plane. Suicide missions hadn't previously been experienced with plane hijackings. If someone tried that now, they damn well better outnumber the innocent passengers, because no one is going to stand by while some hijacker takes over control.

There have only been 11 significant hijackings in the world since 9/11, and in the last 3 cases, the hijackers were subdued by passengers every time.

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Re: Trekking poles as carry on

Postby MountainHiker » Wed Aug 28, 2013 12:02 pm

Derby Ale wrote:Does anyone even think you could hijack a plane with box cutters anymore? The only reason it worked then was because no one ever imagined the plan was crash the plane. Suicide missions hadn't previously been experienced with plane hijackings. If someone tried that now, they damn well better outnumber the innocent passengers, because no one is going to stand by while some hijacker takes over control.

There have only been 11 significant hijackings in the world since 9/11, and in the last 3 cases, the hijackers were subdued by passengers every time.

Agree. There are so many ways a terrorist could mess with us that airport security is like having a metal door on a paper house. Unless we’re willing to live like prisoners in every aspect of our lives, going overboard in one area is pointless.
Red, Rugged, and Rotten: The Elk Range - Borneman & Lampert

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