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Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

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Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby Indigomountain » Mon May 20, 2013 11:46 am

I tried to use the search function for this topic but my search engine skills are not very refined. So here is my question.

I recently started to use trekking poles while hiking which has been a huge relief to my knees. (most of my hiking happens in the Ouray area) I currently use my Tubbs from snowshoes (which are pretty old) but I didn't want to buy new if I wasn't going like using poles. I do like using them and I really have no other issues with my poles other than lots of vibration. Will better quality trekking poles eliminate some/most vibration? In your folks opinion do you think I should invest in new. I have done some research and think this may be a good decision but I was thinking folks on this site with more trekking pole experience may have some valuable input. Thanks in advance.
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Re: Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby GregMiller » Mon May 20, 2013 12:01 pm

I have the black diamond trailshock poles, which are supposed to dampen out vibrations, and have never noticed any vibration. That being said, they're the only poles I've ever hiked with, so I don't really have a baseline to compare to.

In what I've seen, the major thing you get with more expensive poles is a more robust adjustment system. The black diamond flick lock system (edit, as opposed to the various twist lock systems) is pretty bomber, but their patent on it expired a couple years back iirc, so you're starting to see similar systems on poles from REI and others.
Last edited by GregMiller on Mon May 20, 2013 12:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby Duffus Kentucky Climber » Mon May 20, 2013 12:03 pm

Trekking poles: good
Trekking poles with shock absorbers: better
Trekking poles with ergonomic grips and shock absorbers: best
If you can break them down to go in luggage: opps! I peed myself. :oops:
It looks like the ridge is just right up there!

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Re: Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby jaymz » Mon May 20, 2013 12:57 pm

As soon as I get paid this week I'm picking up some BD flicklocks. I'm going new, because I got a couple of used pairs at an REI garage sale, and they were pretty much useless on the trail - they're twist-locking, and the whole locking mechanisms were shot.
I'm sure you could find some good used ones, but as for me and my knees, I'll only trust poles that I know haven't been beaten all to heck. Good trekking poles are one of those pieces of equipment you'll be glad you paid a little extra for, in my opinion.

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Re: Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby halfdomer » Mon May 20, 2013 2:26 pm

I believe BD trekking poles are 25% off as part of REI's anniversary sale right now.

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Re: Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby Dex » Mon May 20, 2013 3:17 pm

Indigomountain wrote:I tried to use the search function for this topic but my search engine skills are not very refined. So here is my question.

I recently started to use trekking poles while hiking which has been a huge relief to my knees. (most of my hiking happens in the Ouray area) I currently use my Tubbs from snowshoes (which are pretty old) but I didn't want to buy new if I wasn't going like using poles. I do like using them and I really have no other issues with my poles other than lots of vibration. Will better quality trekking poles eliminate some/most vibration? In your folks opinion do you think I should invest in new. I have done some research and think this may be a good decision but I was thinking folks on this site with more trekking pole experience may have some valuable input. Thanks in advance.


Question - how are you holding the poles - are you gripping the grips with your hand & fingers

or

Are you relying on the straps - weight on the straps - not gripping the grips?
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Re: Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby Cruiser » Mon May 20, 2013 3:21 pm

I have been hiking with trekking poles for about 15 years now. After going through several sets I have found that I really don't prefer the anti-shock kind. In my experience the antishock seems to like to turn on and off randomly which bugs the heck out of me on the ascents. Further, I find non-antishock poles to be more stable. Stability is really important to me when using poles in rocky terrain since there are lots of occasions that I want to put a lot of my body weight on a single pole in order to clear an obstacle.

BD flicklocks FTW!
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Re: Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby Indigomountain » Mon May 20, 2013 3:31 pm

Dex wrote:
Indigomountain wrote:I tried to use the search function for this topic but my search engine skills are not very refined. So here is my question.

I recently started to use trekking poles while hiking which has been a huge relief to my knees. (most of my hiking happens in the Ouray area) I currently use my Tubbs from snowshoes (which are pretty old) but I didn't want to buy new if I wasn't going like using poles. I do like using them and I really have no other issues with my poles other than lots of vibration. Will better quality trekking poles eliminate some/most vibration? In your folks opinion do you think I should invest in new. I have done some research and think this may be a good decision but I was thinking folks on this site with more trekking pole experience may have some valuable input. Thanks in advance.


Question - how are you holding the poles - are you gripping the grips with your hand & fingers

or

Are you relying on the straps - weight on the straps - not gripping the grips?



I actually do both. Sometimes I find that I have a "death grip" on the poles. I then try to relax my hands and put more weight on the straps. I really try to find a happy medium with a balanced grip on my poles and not too much weight on the straps. What's your insight on this?
"Peace, Love and Fresh Mountain Air"

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Re: Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby rlw49 » Mon May 20, 2013 4:13 pm

+1 to Cruiser BD's are great

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Re: Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby jaymz » Mon May 20, 2013 4:48 pm

halfdomer wrote:I believe BD trekking poles are 25% off as part of REI's anniversary sale right now.

Yep, and I still have my dividend and about $35 bucks on a gift card! The hiking gods are telling me to get new poles.

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Re: Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby Dex » Mon May 20, 2013 4:59 pm

Indigomountain wrote:e]

Question - how are you holding the poles - are you gripping the grips with your hand & fingers

or

Are you relying on the straps - weight on the straps - not gripping the grips?

I actually do both. Sometimes I find that I have a "death grip" on the poles. I then try to relax my hands and put more weight on the straps. I really try to find a happy medium with a balanced grip on my poles and not too much weight on the straps. What's your insight on this?


I suggest the problem isn't with the poles but with your technique.

I've learned not to hold the grips - I rely on the straps. I steer the poles with my pinky or the last two fingers.

I can't go into all of the benefits but - with the straps you are using larger muscles. Also, when you trust the straps you can protect against a fall faster and more securely then with gripping.

I also adjust the length of the poles according to the terrain. On 14ers I start out at 125 and on the way down 140 mm(?).

Look on line for some instructions.


I have these and they work well.
http://www.rei.com/product/830470/black-diamond-trail-back-trekking-poles-pair
Montani Semper Liberi
"Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous." Barry Ritholtz

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Re: Better quality trekking poles = less vibration?

Postby Indigomountain » Mon May 20, 2013 5:28 pm

Dex wrote:
Indigomountain wrote:e]

Question - how are you holding the poles - are you gripping the grips with your hand & fingers

or

Are you relying on the straps - weight on the straps - not gripping the grips?

I actually do both. Sometimes I find that I have a "death grip" on the poles. I then try to relax my hands and put more weight on the straps. I really try to find a happy medium with a balanced grip on my poles and not too much weight on the straps. What's your insight on this?


I suggest the problem isn't with the poles but with your technique.

I've learned not to hold the grips - I rely on the straps. I steer the poles with my pinky or the last two fingers.

I can't go into all of the benefits but - with the straps you are using larger muscles. Also, when you trust the straps you can protect against a fall faster and more securely then with gripping.

I also adjust the length of the poles according to the terrain. On 14ers I start out at 125 and on the way down 140 mm(?).

Look on line for some instructions.


I have these and they work well.
http://www.rei.com/product/830470/black-diamond-trail-back-trekking-poles-pair


Thanks for the advice. I have been doing a bit of reading and trying different things while on the trail since I just started using. I think I have my pole lengths correct in terms of going up/down different terrain. I will try your suggestion, trust the straps a bit and see what happens. Thanks again.
"Peace, Love and Fresh Mountain Air"

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