Forum
Buying gear? Please use these links to help 14ers.com:

More info...

Other ways to help...

Sleeping Pads

Info on gear, conditioning, and preparation for hiking/climbing. Gear Classifieds
User avatar
Posts: 11
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2013 4:45 pm
Location: South Dakota

Sleeping Pads

Postby Fire_on_High » Wed May 01, 2013 11:50 am

I'm wondering what the community is using for sleeping pads (if anyone is)? I have an older Therm-a-Rest, that was gifted to me, and while it is better than the hard earth it doesn't exactly blow me away either.
I've noticed on a lot of reviews for other pads that some folks feel many pads are too thin. So, what're you guys packing? :!:

Re: Sleeping Pads

Postby lordhelmut » Wed May 01, 2013 11:57 am

Time, tested thermarests are tough to beat. They inflate/deflate with ease. Big Agnes Q-core are solid, but you pass out at least twice trying to blow them up and they are pricey, but the weight : warmth ratio is top notch and they are comfortable. I personally took the middle ground and have the BA Insulated Aircore.

Online
User avatar
Posts: 760
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2011 4:58 pm
Location: Louisville, CO

Re: Sleeping Pads

Postby GregMiller » Wed May 01, 2013 12:10 pm

I have a Big Agnes Insulated Air core that I'm happy enough with, but yes, I feel like I'm going to pass out when I'm blowing it up. The space/weight savings over traditional thermarest pads is worth it, though.

In winter I've been putting a Thermarest Z Lite Sol beneath it, and have been pretty happy with that (it makes a great sit platform on winter hikes, especially if you have it strapped to the outside of your pack for easy access).

In an ideal world (where I have as much money and gear storage space as I'd want), I'd grab an Exped Downmat for winter stuff, and probably a Thermarest NeoAir or a Big Agnes Q-Core for summer stuff.
Still Here
been scared and battered. My hopes the wind done scattered. Snow has friz me, Sun has baked me,
Looks like between 'em they done Tried to make me
Stop laughin', stop lovin', stop livin'-- But I don't care! I'm still here!
Langston Hughes

Moderator
User avatar
Posts: 4903
Joined: Mon Jul 26, 2004 8:54 am
Location: Woodland Park, Colorado

Re: Sleeping Pads

Postby CO Native » Wed May 01, 2013 12:16 pm

BA Insulated Air Core here too. The old heavy "self-inflating" pads are just not practical in comparison. In winter I also carry a closed cell in addition to my Air Core. Adds extra insulation and is nice just in case I get a leak in the air core.
Remember what your knees are for.
http://www.hikingintherockies.com

User avatar
Posts: 81
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 10:45 pm
Location: Littleton, CO

Re: Sleeping Pads

Postby 3rdGenNative » Wed May 01, 2013 12:17 pm

I've never done any cold weather camping but I use an Insulmat. Looks just like the BA Air Core referenced above but doesn't have the insulation. As far as cushion, it's great, something like 2 1/2" thick. As a side-sleeper it keeps my hips off of the ground really well. The Air Cores weren't on the market when I got my pad. I'd give them a serious look now.
"There is more in us than we know. If we can be made to see it, perhaps, for the rest of our lives, we will never again settle for less."
Kurt Hahn-Founder of Outward Bound

"Reading about nature is fine, but if a person walks in the woods and listens carefully, he can learn more than what is in books, for they speak with the voice of God." George Washington Carver

Moderator
User avatar
Posts: 4903
Joined: Mon Jul 26, 2004 8:54 am
Location: Woodland Park, Colorado

Re: Sleeping Pads

Postby CO Native » Wed May 01, 2013 12:28 pm

Well it looks like my Insulated Air Core has been replaced by the insulated Q-Core. Main difference being they added an inch of thickness and some extra insulation. Still comes in at just one pound though. I wonder how many extra breaths it takes to blow up that additional inch though. Certainly not my favorite part, especially after an exhausting day and camping over 12,000 feet. Worth it though for a comfortable night of sleep. Just don't try blowing it up while standing or you could hurt your self when you pass out.
Remember what your knees are for.
http://www.hikingintherockies.com

User avatar
Posts: 194
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2006 7:36 pm
Location: Fayetteville, AR

Re: Sleeping Pads

Postby Kent McLemore » Wed May 01, 2013 12:36 pm

Over the last several years, I've taken great pains to lighten the weight and decrease the bulk of my gear. With one exception: sleeping pads. As I've aged, the hard ground bothers me than it used to. So I've gone to a two piece system consisting of a Neo-Air and an old Z-Lite Thermarest cut down to about two thirds its original length. I use the piece of Z-lite as a trail/campground seat and at night tuck it under the Neo_Air for more warmth and cushioning from my shoulders to my knees. Heavier? Yes. Bulkier? Yes. Easier on old hips and shoulders? Yesiree.
"Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." - John Muir

User avatar
Posts: 75
Joined: Tue Jun 01, 2010 8:35 am
Location: Parker

Re: Sleeping Pads

Postby sheller » Wed May 01, 2013 12:37 pm

BA insulated core. I don't think blowing it up is that big of a deal, especially when you gain so much in comfort and a better night's sleep. It also packs down really small and sits around 1 lb.

User avatar
Posts: 63
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2007 9:58 pm
Location: Laramie, WY

Re: Sleeping Pads

Postby atbaritone » Wed May 01, 2013 12:59 pm

REI 2.5 inch camp bed, all the way, all the time. It is bulky and heavy and I wake up rested with no sore spots or aches. I have gladly carried it hundreds of miles and will gladly carry it for hundreds more. And I never feel the cold ground seeping through as I did in my whimpy 1 inch thermarest. Not trying to invoke the princess and the pea here, but I do sleep like royalty :-D Next step for me is sewing a fleece blanket for my pad and using a square down bag like a blanket. No more confined legs for me!
An unsuccessful day climbing is better than a successful day working.--Me.

User avatar
Posts: 1503
Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2009 2:27 pm
Location: Denver/Golden

Re: Sleeping Pads

Postby SurfNTurf » Wed May 01, 2013 1:06 pm

I've used an old Thermarest Trail Pro since 2008. Still going strong. It's heavy and packs down to about the size of a Volkswagen, but it's never let me down. Usually combine it with a standard blue closed-cell pad from REI (the $20 variety) cut to 3/4-length when on snow or frozen ground.

I did just purchase a Kelty Alpine pad, which appears to already not be in production anymore. That's a good sign, right? It's a combination inflatable pad with a removable closed-cell insert. Seems like a pretty cool idea for winter, and the entire contraption weighs as much and packs down about the same as my old Thermarest. Looking forward to testing it in the next few weeks, as well as without the closed-cell insert this summer.

I may not own the fanciest sleeping pads on the market, but any price tag over $100 just doesn't seem worth it to me. Disclaimer: I prefer carrying my pads on the outside bottom of my pack anyway, so compressibility is very far down on my list of priorities.
Last edited by SurfNTurf on Tue May 07, 2013 9:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
Many Miles to Go (Blog)

“There are two kinds of climbers: those who climb because their heart sings when they’re in the mountains, and all the rest.” - Alex Lowe

"There have been joys too great to describe in words, and there have been griefs upon which I cannot dare to dwell; and with those in mind I say, 'Climb if you will, but remember that courage and strength are nought without prudence, and that a momentary negligence may destroy the happiness of a lifetime. Do nothing in haste, look well to each step, and from the beginning think what may be the end.'" - Edward Whymper

Re: Sleeping Pads

Postby KyleS » Wed May 01, 2013 1:28 pm

I'm on a Q-Core and it's great. If I remember correctly, cheaper and thicker than the neo-air plus no crinkle noise when you roll around. Don't listen to the melodrama, blowing it up is cake and well worth the time for the additional comfort. I've used it on snow and wasn't cold at all - no extra pad needed. Plus by buying Big Agnes, you're supporting a Colorado company.

One thing I'll recommend is buying a Big Agnes sleeping bag as well. The integration of the bag and pad lowers the overall volume and weight and keeps you from rolling off the pad in the middle of the night.

Online
User avatar
Posts: 760
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2011 4:58 pm
Location: Louisville, CO

Re: Sleeping Pads

Postby GregMiller » Wed May 01, 2013 1:58 pm

KyleS wrote:One thing I'll recommend is buying a Big Agnes sleeping bag as well. The integration of the bag and pad lowers the overall volume and weight and keeps you from rolling off the pad in the middle of the night.


I have a 'square' big agnes pad and bag that do this, and it's pretty handy. Anyone have a 'mummy' bag/bad from them that do this? That's what might actually be next on my list, if they're good.
Still Here
been scared and battered. My hopes the wind done scattered. Snow has friz me, Sun has baked me,
Looks like between 'em they done Tried to make me
Stop laughin', stop lovin', stop livin'-- But I don't care! I'm still here!
Langston Hughes

Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: ParanoidJoe and 12 guests