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Hilleberg tents

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Hilleberg tents

Postby SarahT » Tue Nov 27, 2007 11:25 am

Does anybody out there have a Hilleberg tent? I am strongly considering buying one for an upcoming expedition where I will be camping around 18-19K in the Andes. Specifically, I'm trying to decide whether I can get by with the lighter weight Nallo series or whether I should go with the heavier Nammatj. So far I have only found one opinion on the matter from somebody who has been on the mountain and they say that they WOULD NOT take the lighter weight version. I'm hoping to get a second, third.... opinion.

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Postby Neil » Wed Nov 28, 2007 9:48 pm

SarahT -- did you get any additional info re the Hilleberg tent? I am strongly considering one as well for use in similar conditions as you discuss (high Andes, Alps, winter CO, and Pacific NW). I have been through Neptune Mountaineering's selection a few times and the sales crew there loves these things. Despite my faith in Neptune as a knowledgable (if sometimes a little cocky!) shop, I would definitely like additional info and independent verification. I couldn't find much on Summit Post or other sites with equipment reviews. Anything on your end? Thanks...

Jared -- have you found the Staika's strength to be worth the weight?
"On the edge of the porch in the warm evening night
Throwing the bone for the dog I see two passing lights
Well, I wonder where that driver's bound
Is there someone, somewhere, someway out there that I've not found"
-Driving Song

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Postby Cruiser » Wed Nov 28, 2007 10:41 pm

One of my hiking partners has a Hilleberg. I can't remember the name, but it's one of the dome style tents. It is absolutely bullet proof. Not the lightweigh version though. It's fairly heavy, but I can't say enough about the venting, guy points, and build quality of that tent. It's a cut abouve anything else I've used or tested out. If I were you, I'd skip the lite version and go for one of the regular weight ones. At the end of the day you're going to want a bombproof shelter up there.
Where ever you are... There you are.

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Postby MyFeetHurt » Wed Nov 28, 2007 11:22 pm

I have 2, the Jannu and the Akto. Both are awesome in their own way. I know the Jannu uses the lighter weight fabric and I was worried about that, but when I went to Neptune and did the rip test between the 2 Hilleberg fabrics and the silnylon, and it was obvious that both Hilleberg fabrics are FAR stronger then you would think. I couldnt rip them and the silnylon was like tissue paper. I bought the tent immediately. The Jannu is nice because you can set up, cook and vent in a raging blizzard and not get the inside wet. I wouldnt hesitate to throw rocks at it when it's fully staked out because it pitches so tight. Biblers are nice too but keep in mind that the fuzzy fabric can freeze and be hard to pack, and they are not summer friendly. I bought my Jannu for cold windy winters, with hopes of using it in the Andes, but I found that it works well in the summer too.

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Postby Neil » Thu Nov 29, 2007 6:37 am

Thanks everyone...all of your responses are very helpful.

My lingering concern is comparing the Staika with the Mountain Hardware EV2. They are roughtly the same price, but the EV2 can pack down to almost 3 lbs. less than the Staika. Jared, I'm with you to a degree. I dont really mind weight, but I also like to shed it where possible.

That being said, are any of you aware of substantive performance differences between the Staika and EV2 (aside from the dual vestible, which may be enough on its own for me to go with the Staika)? I am still having trouble finding good reviews on the Staika, so any insight on its strength, convenience, performance, etc. vs. the EV2 would be appreciated. Thanks!
"On the edge of the porch in the warm evening night
Throwing the bone for the dog I see two passing lights
Well, I wonder where that driver's bound
Is there someone, somewhere, someway out there that I've not found"
-Driving Song

Climb14er

Postby Climb14er » Thu Nov 29, 2007 7:18 am

For serious alpine mountaineering, can the Hilleberg and get yourself either a Bibler or an Integral Designs single wall!

The extra pound or two is the added security of walls shedding both snow and wind and the ability to erect one and get into it in an emergency if you need to. The single wall has a smaller footprint as well which can be important on ledges and snow shelfs.

Hilleys are fine tents but up high, IMHO, they don't come close to a high quality single wall.

I've had both Biblers and Integral designs, in various sizes and still have my ID.

I wouldn't substitute the ID for a Hilley at fifty cents on the dollar at high altitude conditions. My life is worth a lot more than either saving some weight or money. :wink:

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Postby Neil » Thu Nov 29, 2007 7:57 am

Thank you all again for taking the time to answer this. I've been hauling around a pretty beat-up and worn out Trango 2.1 for 10 years now and it's time to upgrade. More soon...
"On the edge of the porch in the warm evening night
Throwing the bone for the dog I see two passing lights
Well, I wonder where that driver's bound
Is there someone, somewhere, someway out there that I've not found"
-Driving Song

Climb14er

Postby Climb14er » Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:11 am

Jared Workman wrote:Other than the issue of pitching on ledges or erecting while inside I prefer my Staika to the Biblers. I'd be hard pressed to believe that the Bibler will withstand weather any better. I can't speak for the ID tents as I have no experience but I'd put the quality and craftmanship of the Hillebergs above Biblers. My only real issue with the Staika is its size which has been an issue and at times when this poses a problem I'd prefer a Bibler.

This forum has a good comparison http://www.nwhikers.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=7961763

I'm referencing the dome Hillebergs I think the tubes would be impractical to set up in the high alpine in many situations.

Climb14er wrote:For serious alpine mountaineering, can the Hilleberg and get yourself either a Bibler or an Integral Designs single wall!

The extra pound or two is the added security of walls shedding both snow and wind and the ability to erect one and get into it in an emergency if you need to. The single wall has a smaller footprint as well which can be important on ledges and snow shelfs.

Hilleys are fine tents but up high, IMHO, they don't come close to a high quality single wall.

I've had both Biblers and Integral designs, in various sizes and still have my ID.

I wouldn't substitute the ID for a Hilley at fifty cents on the dollar at high altitude conditions. My life is worth a lot more than either saving some weight or money. :wink:


I've been in Hilleys and single walls and in 'real mountaineeriing' situations, you're usually erecting a tent in a narrow, sometimes confined space and not on a valley floor or on a platform in the trees. This is where the single wall shines due to its small footprint. Plus, a single wall excels in cold weather as the transfer of condensation is improved there than in a conventional tent.

Have you been in a tent up high for three to five consecutive days where the walls are being continually snow loaded and/or the fly has been constantly flapping about? It's enough to make you go crazy.

Granted, Hilleys have a good reputation. But most of the Hilleys I've seen pitched are at lower elevations, and not in a true much higher altitude alpine mountaineering setting.

BTW, I prefer an ID over a Bibler due to the better quality construction and that it's made in Canada vs I believe Biblers now made in China.

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Postby SarahT » Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:29 am

panicneil wrote:SarahT -- did you get any additional info re the Hilleberg tent? I am strongly considering one as well for use in similar conditions as you discuss (high Andes, Alps, winter CO, and Pacific NW). I have been through Neptune Mountaineering's selection a few times and the sales crew there loves these things. Despite my faith in Neptune as a knowledgable (if sometimes a little cocky!) shop, I would definitely like additional info and independent verification. I couldn't find much on Summit Post or other sites with equipment reviews. Anything on your end? Thanks...


I know somebody who has both the Nammatj and Nallo. They have used the Nammatj in the conditions you mention and have great things to say about it. They love the Nallo too, but don't think it would be suited for big mountains. It would be great for Colorado. They recommended considering using double poles high up on big mountains for extra strength without much weight increase. The Nammatj is made so that two poles can be inserted into each sleeve. I have decided to buy the Nammatj 3 so that the two of us will have more wiggle room and can fit all of our stuff in it for the long expedition.

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Postby SarahT » Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:37 am

Climb14er wrote:For serious alpine mountaineering, can the Hilleberg and get yourself either a Bibler or an Integral Designs single wall!


I did my research about 6 months ago and people had great things to say about Biblers so I forked over the cash to get their I-tent. A few weeks ago I finally got around to using it and wasn't very happy with it. Sure, it is an absolutely bomber tent, no doubt about that. But the thing is so darn small that me and my boyfriend hate sleeping in it. We can't even sit up! I'm sure its ideal for serious alpine climbing, but for a long expedition, I'm going with something else! The Hilleberg's just look so much more comfortable, especially if the weather sucks and we're trapped inside all day.

Climb14er

Postby Climb14er » Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:49 am

SarahT wrote:
Climb14er wrote:For serious alpine mountaineering, can the Hilleberg and get yourself either a Bibler or an Integral Designs single wall!


I did my research about 6 months ago and people had great things to say about Biblers so I forked over the cash to get their I-tent. A few weeks ago I finally got around to using it and wasn't very happy with it. Sure, it is an absolutely bomber tent, no doubt about that. But the thing is so darn small that me and my boyfriend hate sleeping in it. We can't even sit up! I'm sure its ideal for serious alpine climbing, but for a long expedition, I'm going with something else! The Hilleberg's just look so much more comfortable, especially if the weather sucks and we're trapped inside all day.


You got a single to 1.5 person tent, that's why you were cramped. Bibler makes two other models that you can ride out a storm in for days. ID makes two tents, one which I have, the other I had which is more than enough room for two and you can sit up in.

Enjoy your Hilley and report back when the SHTF and you can relate how it performed. :wink:

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Postby SarahT » Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:53 am

Climb14er wrote:Enjoy your Hilley and report back when the SHTF and you can relate how it performed. :wink:


We're just trying to get opinions and hear about other's experiences with various tents here, no need to be a jackass.

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