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Suggestions on trail running shoes

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Suggestions on trail running shoes

Postby HylianHero » Sun Nov 25, 2007 9:16 pm

So I've been a boot-wearer since I started hiking, but recently, I think that I would rather hike and climb in trail running shoes. Does anyone have any suggestions on good trail running shoes?
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Postby MtHurd » Sun Nov 25, 2007 9:33 pm

Whatever you get, make sure they have Gore-Tex. I've used them in summer and winter, even with crampons. I hate boots.

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Postby summitrunner » Sun Nov 25, 2007 9:37 pm

I can't suggest a trail runner for you but I will tell you I have only hiked mountains in running shoes. The only drawback I would say is the plastic on the bottom can slip on rocks (regular running shoes). I feel a lot more comfortable in my Nike Air Max Motos than probably any other boot or shoe (running thousands of miles in them with dozens of pairs). They have greatly reduced the plastic on the bottom so they are even better on the mountains. They made a Clima-Fit version that I use when I snowshoe run and have worn them on the mountains too.

Good choice on switching to trail running shoes...others on here will hopefully agree.
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Postby roozers42 » Sun Nov 25, 2007 10:11 pm

I am in love with my Five-10 Insights. They are a summer scrambling shoe, I'm female, and I need a bigger toe box. I like them because they perform great on rock. I had a pair of Merrel trail shoes that were also good. I suggest trying on as many brands as you can - you'll be able to narrow it down quite a bit by that and then can choose the features you want in your shoe.
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Postby thebeave7 » Sun Nov 25, 2007 10:18 pm

First off, I am going to disagree with first posts. Gore-tex is way overrated, especially for trail runners. First, they have reduced breathability, second cost more, third trail runners are too low to offer full weather protection, thus almost defeating the purpose of Gore-tex. For snow it may be useful, but I never wear Gore-tex in the summer.

Shoes are such a personal thing that all we can do is suggest models/brands, after that you'll have to try them on to see how they fit. My favorites are the Brooks Adrenaline, Salomon XA, and Brooks Cascadia. Unfortunately up here in Fort Collins there aren't any really good trail running stores. Runners Roost, REI, and Foot of the Rockies are alright. The people are Runners Roost and Foot of the Rockies have better shoe knowledge. I still haven't found any places in town that do running gate analysis(probably a podiatrist somewhere who does).

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Postby Tory Wells » Sun Nov 25, 2007 11:41 pm

Once again I must agree with TheBeave07, he must be a smart guy. Trail running shoes are such a personal thing, I can only suggest you go to a good running store and try 'em all on. The good ones, like Boulder Running Company, Runner's Roost, and Road Runner Sports, can do a stride analysis on you and help you find the right shoe (REI is great but no stride analysis).

I also agree that Gore-tex is not really necessary in summer; just extra weight and much hotter. I disagree about Nike being a good choice for the mts, but as I said, shoes are so personal.

Seems to me, the companies that make good mountain boots also make good mountain shoes. I personally like the Vasque Velocity (and their newer models are nice too). Montrail, La Sportiva, North Face, Salomon, and Brooks all make shoes that will last a really long time and protect your piggies, which is the name of the game. :)
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Postby Tory Wells » Sun Nov 25, 2007 11:50 pm

Look for a shoe with good toe protection and a sole thick enough to protect the bottoms of your feet from rocks. Some models have a rock plate in there to make you not even notice those smaller rocks you step on.
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Trail shoes

Postby mattsmithva » Mon Nov 26, 2007 2:32 am

I run extensively on a variety of trail shoes on very rocky routes that are frequently wet (also known as the Blue Ridge). . . . so here's my two cents:

I use Goretex SCR shoes ONLY when it is very cold and/or very wet. My feet run a bit hot, and the XCR lining is just too warm for other conditions. In any event, if you don't use a good tight gaiter, water is going to get inside the shoe, and you are more concerned with quick drying that impermeability. Non-XCR works better across the board for me.

As for models, the best I've used (and repurchased) are both Montrails: the Hard Rock (non-XCR) and the Moountain Mist (XCR). Basically the same model with and without the XCR. A conservative choice, not the lightest, but great support and rock protection, and very durable. I go 5'11" , 190 lbs, so I generally do not want a "lightweight" shoe.
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Postby coloradokevin » Mon Nov 26, 2007 3:27 am

Assuming these trail running shoes are being used for trail hiking in this instance, as opposed to running, then I'd say Goretex is quite useful.

My wife and I both hike in trail runners most of the time... Mine are Goretex, her shoes are not. Almost without fail she ends up with wet feet (and therefore pissed off) while my feet remain dry and comfortable. In fact, she is currently planning to buy another pair of her shoes again, this time in the Goretex version!

While I'll fully agree that trail runners don't provide the ultimate in weather protection, they have served me well through boggy spring season hikes, snowfield crossings (when equiped with gaiters), and shallow rock-hop stream crossings! On the other hand, my wife ends up with wet feet in any of those instances.

The other side of the coin, of course, is to actually use these types of shoes for actual trail running. In those cases many people seem to agree that their feet sweat too much to be comfortable in Goretex footwear for most of these ventures! After all, goretex is maybe one step more breathable than a plastic bag... It is still a step, but it isn't perfect!

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Postby summitrunner » Mon Nov 26, 2007 8:10 am

Jared Workman wrote:In general skip Nike, Reebok, Asics, Adidas, etc unless you don't mind buying new shoes frequently. Every single pair of those I've gotten falls apart in a couple months (even from walking only). Good brands are Vasque, Montrail, Asolo, Merrel, LaSportiva, Salomon, Brooks, and Ecco.

You should be changing out shoes every few months. Shoes are only designed to last between 200-450 miles (that equates out to 10 weekends/2.5 months at 20 miles per weekend minimum...we all know that serious hikers/runners will be putting in twice that amount or more in a typical week)...even a high end trail runner will have that shoe life. Changing shoes out frequently and often promotes good joint health and your body will love you for it. Letting a shoe go too long leads to stress fractures, ankle issues, knee problems, hip worries, and back troubles. When I was running 60 miles per week in college on the roads of Greeley I changed my shoes out every month and a half. I can now go two and a half months on the trails in Summit County. Surfaces play a huge impact on shoe life. Soft trails mean longer shoe life. Rocky trails or paved paths will result in a shorter shoe life.

I know a lot of people are anti-Nike but they put out a quality product that has never failed me. Again...everyone's foot is different and finding the perfect running shoe is purely a personal choice. I only said Nike because that is what I use.
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Postby summitrunner » Mon Nov 26, 2007 9:07 am

I have very narrow feet with a high arch. I have found my Motos at the Nike outlet for $55 (originally $90) so every payday I buy a pair or two and have been stockpiling for the worst...when they stop making them! I understand that HH was not asking for a trail runner to run in. A long day of slogging and boulder hopping and stopping yourself every step down hill on a 14er is almost like running 10 miles on I-25.

I just want all of you to take care of your feet so I can hike with you some day!
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Postby Holy Schist » Mon Nov 26, 2007 9:49 am

Hello,

Here is a thread I started a while back just as an FYI that I found a great shoe for me and it worked wonderfully on the first hike and has continued to perform in both hiking and trail running in the local mountains, (no 14ers since the post though).

Plus they are on sale at Kohl's now for $38 (Down from $80). It is the same shoe offered in the specialty running stores, so don't be afraid that they are also at Kohl's.

http://www.14ers.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=9873

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