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Winter Mountaineering Boots

Info on gear, conditioning, and preparation for hiking/climbing. Gear Classifieds
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Postby thebeave7 » Wed Oct 31, 2007 4:31 pm

Just to get the ball rolling and throw a few thoughts out there. I think(and I know many others will agree) that plastics are way overkill for most stuff in Colorado. I have Asolo AFS8000 plastics and have only really worn them while ice climbing in temps around 0, just cause I wasn't moving(they were still warm). Myself and most people I climb with use insulated leathers for most trips. A favorite of many seems to be the La Sportiva Trango Evo series tends to be popular. What it really comes down to is what fits your foot.

Rather than worry about Koflach being out of business, just make that the retailer who sells you the boots has a good return policy.

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Postby Andy » Wed Oct 31, 2007 4:39 pm

All the cool kids seem to be getting the La Sportiva Nepal EVO GTX's - at least that's what most of my partners have.
Last edited by Andy on Wed Oct 31, 2007 4:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby doumall » Wed Oct 31, 2007 4:46 pm

I will echo...

summer boots = winter boots in colorado. I just use my La Sportiva water proof leathers on non-ski trips. Dont buy plastics unless your getting into ice, you will despise them for long hikes.

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Postby summitridge » Wed Oct 31, 2007 4:59 pm

I do like my double plastics for those steep couloir snow climbs. Going up the hourglass on Little Bear this spring with my light hikers and crampons strapped to them was not ideal.

It is well said that long hikes in double plastics are unpleasant at best. When we climbed the southeast couloir of Maroon this past spring, we carried our plastics on our packs and at the base of the garbage chute we cached our light hikers and donned the double plastics and then switched back on the return.

It is all about having a system that works for you. Unfortunately, this can be an expensive trial and error endeavor.
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Postby Cruiser » Wed Oct 31, 2007 5:02 pm

Whatever boot you decide to go with you should really consider having a custom insole made. Review the various options on the web and make some calls to find out which one of the various manufacturers will be best for you, and then buy some. I have Superfeet and I love them. I switch them between my AT boots, summer hikers, and winter hikers. Have them made before you buy your new boots so that you can use them when you are out trying on all of the different boots that you're considering buying.
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Postby wasclywabbit » Wed Oct 31, 2007 5:33 pm

I bought a pair of the La Sportiva Nepal Evo GTX last year and love them. They seem to be built on a somewhat narrow last although your "B" width is probably narrower still. I use orthotics because I too have very flat feet and am a serious over pronator.

I only had a chance to use them twice last winter, once on Quandary and once on Sherman but my feet were never cold.

I started out looking at plastics but nothing I found was even close to the comfort level of the these boots. Additionally every plastic boot I tried on was VERY wide and left my feet swimming.

I bought them at Bent Gate in Golden. It was my first experience with that store and I left very impressed. They took the time to go over available options and they were very patient with all of my questions.
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Postby Cruiser » Wed Oct 31, 2007 6:09 pm

ScottieB wrote:I've gone through several pairs of Superfeet and they are OK. I've been using the the Sole Viesturs for a while now and they work well for me. I'll be sticking with those unless I feel the need to get orthotics.


I might not have been clear about that. I meant the Superfeet full cork custom molded insoles. Not the off the rack trim to fit ones. I hope that you haven't gone through several pairs of those considering that they run ~$100 a set. Great product though!
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Postby E-dorvs » Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:34 pm

I know a ton of people love the LaSportiva brand. I figured I would throw out another idea to check out. I have a pair of Raichle's and have used them on a number of winter climbs and on Rainier. They have been extremely warm even when not moving around. I have pretty small and narrow feet and I find they fit great. I have a discontinued style, but they are similar to these:

http://www.raichle.ch/raichle/katalog.asp?view=detail&did=62&dart=4&tid=53119&sid=2

I actually just recently notice a pair of Raichle's on Sierra Trading Post I included the link below. Not sure your shoe size but they are offering smaller sizes. These specifically may be a little overkill but they sure will be warm.

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/8572,75005_Raichle-EXP-Mountaineering-Boots-Insulated-All-Degree-For-Men-and-Women.html

Just throwing out some other ideas.
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Postby nstutzke » Thu Nov 01, 2007 7:38 am

Check out Kayland boots. I've got a pair of M11s that are excellent for ice climbing and are pretty comfortable for walking in as well. I've got a fairly narrow foot and they fit me well. They've got a bomber heel pocket...zero heel lift. Boulder Mountaineering and Bent Gate both carry Kayland boots.

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Boots

Postby kiliclimber7_17_02 » Thu Nov 01, 2007 7:39 am

I really like my Koflach Arctis Expedition plastic boots. Yes they are heavy but they have kept the feet toasty on winter 14er climbs and we did hike from base camp on Aconcagua in plastics. I did not have any problem with them on that long slog. You can pull the liners and put them in your bag to keep them dry and warm.

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Postby CO Native » Thu Nov 01, 2007 8:24 am

I can't imagine using plastics on a 14er.

Part of your problem may be your waterproofing. Most waterproof treatments take away all breathability of the boot. A boot waterproofed with a gore-tex lining still allows moisture from your feet to evaporate out. I just use leather boots that have gore-tex and then for cold conditions I will use a liner sock inside a good thick pair of wool socks. This keeps my feet dry and warm.

Not to offend, but runners also frequently make the mistake of tying boots wrong (too tightly). A good mountaineering boot will have lace lock offs just below the ankle so you can tie them tight around the ankles for support but leave them a little loose on your foot. This helps allow good blood flow throughout your foot still.
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Postby doumall » Thu Nov 01, 2007 8:48 am

summitridge wrote:I do like my double plastics for those steep couloir snow climbs. Going up the hourglass on Little Bear this spring with my light hikers and crampons strapped to them was not ideal.

It is well said that long hikes in double plastics are unpleasant at best. When we climbed the southeast couloir of Maroon this past spring, we carried our plastics on our packs and at the base of the garbage chute we cached our light hikers and donned the double plastics and then switched back on the return.

It is all about having a system that works for you. Unfortunately, this can be an expensive trial and error endeavor.


I should be clear about using the summer boots year round, mine have a half shank. I wouldnt want to use crampons with anything less. If you hike in the summer with an unsupported boot your going to need a second pair for the winter, duhhh!

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