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Telemark Gear Questions

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Telemark Gear Questions

Postby GlueBoy » Fri Oct 26, 2007 11:46 am

After about 10 years away from Tele skiing I can finally get back into it again. My problem is the gear has changed dramatically since I last went. My last set up was heavy leather boots (Asolo Snowfields) and my skis were long by todays standards (205cm) and unshaped, just to give you an idea of what I remember.

My questions are: Does any one have any tips/tricks for boot fiting? I haven't bought a pair of plastic ski boots since I wa 14. And any advice on brand and model of skis? Being this is my first season I am looking at doing mostly in bounds skiing for at least the first part of the season, but I would like something that could be used in the back country either late this season or next season, depending on how quickly I re-learn how to do this. I just don't want to shell out a bunch of cash this year only to find out that what I bought was totally inappropriate for a more adventurous second or third season. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks

steve

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Postby climber with a k » Fri Oct 26, 2007 1:21 pm

My advice is this: The short cuff boots (T2) Suck. The cuff is too short to generate enough lever force to bend the toe of the boot to easily place the ball of the foot on the ski. The result is smaller boots are actually more difficult to ski on making the taller boots sort of the minimum you would want in performance. The intermediate boots like the T2x did go a long way towards solving this dillemma.
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Postby jrsummit » Fri Oct 26, 2007 3:55 pm

climber with a k wrote:My advice is this: The short cuff boots (T2) Suck. The cuff is too short to generate enough lever force to bend the toe of the boot to easily place the ball of the foot on the ski. The result is smaller boots are actually more difficult to ski on making the taller boots sort of the minimum you would want in performance. The intermediate boots like the T2x did go a long way towards solving this dillemma.


I'll probably get ripped a new one on this site for posting this but I completely enjoy my T2's much more than any other tele boot I have owned (T1s and some junk Crispi's). But everyone has their own preferences and I am a pretty big guy so I never have problems getting anything to flex. Make sure you buy the most comfortable boot for your foot, price and brand never seem to matter as much as comfort on the hill.

As for skis, I hate to say it but I like my K2 Super stinks for cruising around the resorts. Easy to cruise around on and they are a pretty good entry level ski (not to mention you can get a pair new for about $150 online). I kinda like the Rossi Sickbirds and the G3 skis but those are a bit more than you need at the family resort.

Wish I could help more

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Postby jrsummit » Fri Oct 26, 2007 4:15 pm

As a little correction to my post...The T2s have taken a little longer to break in than my other boots, and I am sure that its due to the fact that the shorter cuff does take away some of the leverage when it come to flexing the boot (plus I am hardly a tele skier...I'm more of a guy who likes to tele and I'm probably pretty comical to watch).

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Postby cheeseburglar » Fri Oct 26, 2007 4:51 pm

If you still have the old gear I recommend using it for at least a month.
I still use my 12 year old Asolo Extreme Plus boots and a lot of people get a kick out of it.
Nothing gets respect on the slopes like old school tele gear.
And it would be a shame to hit a rock with brand new gear.
And you can pick peoples brains as to their equipment.
But the 205's might have to go, that is a little crazy!

Postby Bean » Fri Oct 26, 2007 6:31 pm

Go to a good bootfitter.

Get big, fat skis.
gdthomas wrote:Bean, you're an idiot.

http://throughpolarizedeyes.com

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Postby GlueBoy » Fri Oct 26, 2007 8:05 pm

Thanks for the help. jrsummit, that actually helped a lot as I am a big guy too. 5'10" and 250, and have always thought that boots were the most important part of any gear set.

Unfortunately the 205's are long gone. I still have a pair of the old school leather boots, and still use them for touring. I am however really jazzed about buying new gear and appreciate the advice.

Thanks
steve

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Postby telehead » Fri Oct 26, 2007 9:23 pm

Go check out http://www.telemarktips.com and read some reviews on boots for some ideas.

I've been skiing Garmont Veloce for years but have had my eyes on some Garmont Syner-Gs.
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Postby peterparkerw » Fri Oct 26, 2007 11:34 pm

I rent T2's from mountain chalet in the springs all the time and I've never had a problem with them. They're already broken in pretty well. I really can't complain too much because I'm too poor to afford anything else though.

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Re: Telemark Gear Questions

Postby scotthsu » Sat Oct 27, 2007 10:18 am

GlueBoy wrote:My questions are: Does any one have any tips/tricks for boot fiting? I haven't bought a pair of plastic ski boots since I wa 14. And any advice on brand and model of skis? Being this is my first season I am looking at doing mostly in bounds skiing for at least the first part of the season, but I would like something that could be used in the back country either late this season or next season, depending on how quickly I re-learn how to do this. I just don't want to shell out a bunch of cash this year only to find out that what I bought was totally inappropriate for a more adventurous second or third season. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks

steve


hey steve,

i think the best thing to do for getting good-fitting boots is to go to a store with a good selection and try on as many different brands as you can. Most of the brands use slightly different lasts to create their boots, and thus different brands are better suited to different people. It is very difficult to determine which brand fits the best for you unless you try them on. I use the Garmont Energ-G (4 buckle). These are on the stiffer end of tele boots, and I chose them because I ski on them inbounds a lot. I also ski on them in the backcountry, and I think they work fine (although to be sure there are lighter tele boots out there).

The new tele gear is truly amazing, dramatically reducing the gap between alpine and tele in terms of what terrain you can access and absolutely rip up.

For both inbounds and backcountry versatility, I'd recommend tele skis with decent width underfoot (80-90mm) and a good sidecut (>120mm at the shovel and <20m turning radius). Tele skis are lighter than alpine skis, and tele turns allow you to get away with less stiffness in the skis. The width underfoot gives you the flotation you'd want for powder and bc corn, while the sidecut and lower turning radius allows you to have more fun carving on the groomers when you ski inbounds. The lower turning radius also helps you properly learn how to carve effectively on the modern shaped skis. I just got the Atomic RT86's last spring, and they were a blast in the backcountry. I can't wait to ski on them inbounds in the upcoming season. As for tele bindings, I use the Karhu 7TM Power, mostly because they are releasable (important in my opinion for the backcountry).

One final issue, before you purchase anything, you should at least look into the new NTN binding/boot system. People rave about this and many believe it to be the future of telemark. If you need to invest in both bindings and boots, it may make sense to go with the new system (although it will cost you a pretty penny). The new system has superior edge control, is releasable, has easier entry/exit, and boots that are compatible with AT bindings.

Have fun!

Scott

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