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Pack Winterizing

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Pack Winterizing

Postby rlw49 » Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:05 pm

I'd like to get suggestions for preventing liquids freezing during winter. This would include both camelbacks and nalgene bottles and thermoses.
I still want to try the shot of vodka in the camelback.
Thanks in advance for any info.

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Postby CO Native » Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:13 pm

Hydration packs don't work in the winter, even with those tube insulators. If you feel the need to try the only hint I can give is everytime after you finish drinking, blow all the water back down the tube into the bladder.

OR makes a great insulator for nalgenes that does a good job. Don't fill the bottle all the way so the sloshing around will prevent icing. Also pack the bottle upside down so any ice that does form will be on the bottom and not prevent you from drinking.
Remember what your knees are for.
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Postby CO Native » Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:15 pm

And anything you add to the water (like gatorade mix) will lower the freezing point of the liquid so that can help too, but I think the negative effects of the vodka on you at altitude in the winter might not be worth it.
Remember what your knees are for.
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Postby rlw49 » Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:17 pm

co native
Any luck with the handwarmers to keep things in the pack liquid? Say minimum of 4 hrs outside.
Thanks

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Postby Holy Schist » Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:19 pm

For the Nalgene's, mine have not frozen when they are in their Handy little insulated carrying pouch.

http://www.rei.com/product/717325?vcat=REI_SEARCH

However, do store them upside down, as the free space at the top is quicker to freeze, and can freeze the lid shut.

When camping, store them in your sleeping bag, but make sure they are closed tight.

CamelBack, good luck. For skiing, you can put it under your coat.

Hope that made sense.

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Postby Holy Schist » Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:21 pm

Damn, COnative types faster than I do.

Maybe smarter too

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Postby rlw49 » Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:42 pm

holy schist
that's only a 1/2 liter. do you have a bunch of those insulated pouches??
does anyone insulate their pack with a foam mat? I can't imagine people
melting smow on a day hike.

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Postby Gossnath » Wed Oct 10, 2007 10:05 pm

No need for anything extra to insulate. just wrap in whatever extra cloths you have. Camelbaks have always worked alright for me, unless really really cold. Just drink frequently, good idea anyway. Always have some extra Nalgenes with you just in case your line freezes.

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Postby Holy Schist » Wed Oct 10, 2007 10:07 pm

rlw49 wrote:holy schist
that's only a 1/2 liter. do you have a bunch of those insulated pouches??
does anyone insulate their pack with a foam mat? I can't imagine people
melting smow on a day hike.


oops, we have the 1 liter size, but it looks like the same thing.

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Postby thebeave7 » Wed Oct 10, 2007 10:33 pm

Another option I've used is to slide a half liter/liter(whatever fits) bottle into a pocket inside your jacket. I use platapus bags, as they collapse and conform nicely. This also keeps a water bottle right in hand, so one is more prone to drinking.
Eric
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Postby firsttracks » Thu Oct 11, 2007 7:12 am

Here are my favorites:

OR Water Bottle Parka

40 Below 1.5 L Bottle Cover

I've used both of these on Denali, and I never had a bottle freeze down to -40.

Here are several tricks:
1. Fill your bottles with warm water.
2. Sleep with your bottles in your sleeping bag to keep them warm.
3. Keep your bottles inside your jacket if at all possible (most down jackets have water bottle pockets inside).

Hope that helps!

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Postby gc » Thu Oct 11, 2007 7:18 am

I just use gatorade bottles in my jacket or a parka designed for bottles. Gatorade bottles are lighter than nalgenes, practically indestructable and you can put boiling water in them. Just my preference but there's a lot of methods that would work.

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