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3,000 foot rule in question

Trailhead conditions, directions, roads, parking, camping, etc. Trailhead Info/Status
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Postby skier25 » Tue Sep 05, 2006 7:49 pm

I did NOT hike Belford via the Oxford route. Instead, I climbed Missouri Mountain (from Missouri Gulch), backtracked Northwest along the standard Missouri Mountain route, and glissaded down into Missouri Gulch again. I crossed the gulch and proceeded up the grassy slopes on Belford's SouthWest side. I descended the NorthWest ridge of Belford back down into Missouri Gulch, and had a hell of a problem with my boots that were one size too small. It was a damn big hike to say the least (two 14ers in one day following the 3,000 foot rule). ](*,)
Carry an ice axe and a clear mentality; they can both save your life.
I get acute mountain sickness when I am away from the mountains.

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Close enough....

Postby bdavis » Tue Sep 05, 2006 8:43 pm

According to my Topo maps and GPS, I gained about 5694 cumulative feet while doing Belford and Oxford(between the initial ascent, the ascent of Oxford, and the reascent of Belford). The way I figure it, that's nearly 3000 feet for each peak - so that practically counts.

Then again, I'm only a partial believer of the 3000' rule. It's a reasonable place to start tackling a peak, but when bagging two in a row, I ignore it. Of course, it is convenient to distinguish those that hike Mt. Evans from the parking lot at the top vs. an actual trailhead...

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Postby paully » Fri Sep 08, 2006 8:44 am

I personally love the 3000' rule. Yeah, it's just a guideline but you have to have some kind of guideline, otherwise you'd have a lot of people claiming to have climbed such-and-such mountain without breaking a sweat. 2000' seems reasonable to me if it works for you, 1000' does not. However, I believe the Belford/Oxford combo gives you approximately 5900', so what's the big deal? That's close enough in my book.

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Evans

Postby ColoMtnHiker » Fri Sep 08, 2006 12:16 pm

Have climbed to the summit from Chicago Lakes on one trip and down and back from the Sawtooth on another but don't think either trip qualified for the 3000 ft rule but I still am claiming Evans on my list. Purists be damned.
There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."

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Postby TravelingMatt » Tue Sep 12, 2006 10:15 am

3,000 feet? You mean you're starting way up at 11,000? Come on, real hikers start at sea level. For Colorado the preferable trailhead is the Gulf of Mexico, because starting at the Atlantic or Pacific requires crossing other mountains and thus losing elevation.

If you start near New Orleans, you can get to the Sawatch peaks by hiking along the Mississippi and turning left up the Arkansas. Just make sure you start on the west bank. :twisted:

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Postby sanjuanmtneer » Tue Sep 12, 2006 1:09 pm

After 575 summits in Colorado:
Some were 3000+ ft. climbs, some weren't.
Some were boring walk-ups, some were technical ascents.
Some were leisurely strolls, some left me beaten and bruised.
Some took less than 1/2 a day, some took from pre-dawn til after dark.
I don't really care about what anyone else thinks.
I think I'll call myself a mountaineer.

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Postby elkheart22 » Tue Sep 12, 2006 2:13 pm

Jeeez,

I have never kept track of all the summits I've done, let alone how many feet in elevation I've gained.
But, I DO have some really cool pictures of wild flowers and a nice shot of the Holy Cross, and a really awesome photo of my wife on Humbolt with the Needle in the background.

If I did it for speed records, then yes, you need rules.
I think it has been stated before on other threads,
do whatever feels comfortable to you.....
Lakes below the mountains
Flow into the sea
Like oils applied to canvas,
They permeate through me. --- Jimmy Buffett

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Postby jfox » Tue Sep 12, 2006 3:41 pm

Andy wrote:
Former Michigander wrote:Excuse my ignorance, and maybe I missed it somewhere in the thread, but is there really a trophy for climbing all the 14ers? If so, let me just say that I can't wait to get my hands on one. I mean, what better motivation to climb 56 (or whatever the official number is) 14ers than a hunk of plastic (if in fact that's what it's made out of. Now, if it were made of duct tape, they might be on to something) that proclaims, "this dude is a totally awesome climbing guy!" :lol:

We're not talkin' some cheezy plastic deal like you got for getting 27th place in t-ball. This baby is solid gold and jewel encrusted!


Awesome!!! 14er Bling! 8)

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Postby paully » Thu Sep 14, 2006 7:08 am

I think people are reading WAY too much into this 3000' rule thing. Many seem to be put off by the whole thing. The fact is, it's just an arbitrary number. But in my mind, there should be a guideline of some kind and 3000' seems like a great choice to me. If I climb 2500', you'd better believe that I consider it a climb. But there has to be some distinction between climbing a mountain and being on the summit of a mountain, because they are truly separate phenomena, with the former requiring far more effort, stamina, planning, and gear. Yes, driving up Mt Evans road and making the last little push to the summit block on foot can be exhilirating for some, but I don't care how exhilirating it is, it isn't a climb of Mt Evans. People on this site are generally experienced and tend to understand what climbing a mountain feels like, so the rule may seem somewhat meaningless to some, but for the general populace, there needs to be a guideline by which you can determine bragging rights for truly climbing a mountain. Believe me, there are people out there who would consider a drive/short hike to a summit to be a mountain climb. Many of you may say 'more power to them', but if you insist that no part of your ego/pride would rise up against such a claim, I think you're kidding yourself.

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Postby Marmotus varmitus » Thu Sep 14, 2006 7:50 am

Former Michigander wrote:Excuse my ignorance, and maybe I missed it somewhere in the thread, but is there really a trophy for climbing all the 14ers? If so, let me just say that I can't wait to get my hands on one. I mean, what better motivation to climb 56 (or whatever the official number is) 14ers than a hunk of plastic (if in fact that's what it's made out of. Now, if it were made of duct tape, they might be on to something) that proclaims, "this dude is a totally awesome climbing guy!" :lol:


Have you ever seen Monty Python and the Holy Grail? Well, here in Colorado its almost the same in that there are a bunch of Sir Robins and Sir Galahads and Sir Lancelots and even the Knights of Neep (?) up there in them thar hills. The only thing missing is a shrubury.

Somewhere, hidden on one of the 14ers is the grail, the trophy you seek. I thought I found it on Windom but it turned out to be a bottle of Scotch that someone stashed. :)

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Postby jfox » Thu Sep 14, 2006 11:51 am

I think we should change the rule to 914.4m instead of 3,000'

Gaining 914.4m makes you way more of a bad-a*s than only gaining a paltry 3,000' in my opinion! :wink:

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Belford & Oxford

Postby seannunn » Fri Jun 08, 2007 6:31 pm

"There isn't a practical way to climb Oxford without climbing virtually all of Belford anyway is there without some serious bushwacking. The standard Missouri Gulch approach and even the Pine Creek approach both pretty much take within a few feet of Belford no matter what you do."

This is a very good point to remember when climbing Oxford. You want to allow more time to retreat during a storm on Oxford, because you have to go back over Belford. Spoken from experience: the thunder rolled in around 10:30am. There was nowhere to go but up in order to get back down. Pretty scary.

Sean Nunn
Raytown MO

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