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3,000 foot rule in question

Trailhead conditions, directions, roads, parking, camping, etc. Trailhead Info/Status
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Location: Castle Rock, CO

Postby Meteor » Tue Aug 29, 2006 9:15 pm

MN teleMARKer wrote:Since I hiked Pikes Peak yesterday via Barr Trail and gained 7400 feet in elevation, can I use half of that to make up for hiking Belford and Oxford together :?: :-k :)


Tparker wrote:Yeah kind of like cellphone roll-over minutes...has potential!


Oh I'm sorry, sir, but our records here show that that hike was made on a Monday, rather than on the weekend. Oh... I'm also sorry to bring this up, sir, but I also notice that that hike would definitely fall under on-peak coverage time... and since you've already pointed out that you put in 4400 feet more than you were allotted, I'm afraid that means you're into overage at this point. But don't worry, sir, we'll have a forklift (equipped with a reverse warning beeper) to drop the bill off at your door! Thank you for choosing 14er wireless, sir! Have a GREAT DAY!! :lol:

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Postby deagle02 » Tue Aug 29, 2006 11:54 pm

[quote="kiddrockies"]
2999's not a climb, ya know??? [/quote]



if you're at 2999... just jump up the last foot and count the 3000 in mid-air. :P

I look at trying different approaches if available otherwise I could care less; the trophy is plastic anyway and I would put it in my garage in a box and forget about it for years to come like my pet rock. :?

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Postby CorduroyCalves » Tue Aug 29, 2006 11:58 pm

Dude, that is one creepy avatar! :shock:

:D

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Postby evilproofer » Wed Aug 30, 2006 1:06 am

Just thought I'd use this occasion to say that I'm living proof; you CAN summit Oxford without Belford. Oxford was officially my 1st 14er; my hiking partner had done Belford and refused to re-summit, so even though we made it above 14000 feet on Belford, she forced me on principle to walk around and avoid the summit of B until we went over to summit Oxford. So if I want to be a 3000-foot purist, someday I can just go re-summit Belford.

I started my Democrat and Bross hikes from a spot below Kite Lake at 11,200 feet. I did each mountain on separate days due to weather, so according to the 3000-ft rule, I fall 52 feet short for Democrat and 28 feet short for Bross. Are the trophy people really going to call me on this someday? If they make me re-summit, that dang trophy had better be bronze!

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Postby mtnview » Wed Aug 30, 2006 1:24 am

Anybody have the history of this rule? Up here in the Cdn Rockies there are many peaks that can be climbed that are only 2,300 feet to say 2,900 feet. You can't really make them any higher so no rules such as this were ever even contemplated.

I can see the point on driveup peaks like Bross, Antero, Castle, Evans, Pikes etc. 1,000+ feet doesn't seem like it should qualify as scrambling the mountain.

When I hiked Bierstadt, Sherman and other combos like Belford/Oxford a rule such as this seemed well not all that relevant to my enjoying the outdoor experience.

I vote for 2,000 feet before you can sign the summit register on singles and combo's. :wink:

Mtnview

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Postby GW Duncan » Wed Aug 30, 2006 7:00 am

Anybody have the history of this rule?


I have that in large part its just because that's about where treeline is in most of Colorado = 11,000 ft.
"At first, nothing happened, then after a moment, nothing continued to happen." Douglas Adams

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Postby Andy » Wed Aug 30, 2006 7:40 am

evilproofer wrote:I started my Democrat and Bross hikes from a spot below Kite Lake at 11,200 feet. I did each mountain on separate days due to weather, so according to the 3000-ft rule, I fall 52 feet short for Democrat and 28 feet short for Bross. Are the trophy people really going to call me on this someday?

You better believe it! Not only is your trophy in jeopardy, but if anyone finds out, just think about all the endorsement you'll miss out on and the speaking engagements you won't be asked to attend. You stand to lose a lot my friend. You better take Democrat and Bross of your list of accomplishments - they don't count.
"What a day, eh, Milhouse? The sun is out, birds are singing,
bees are trying to have sex with them - as is my understanding..."

- Bart Simpson

"You are not Steve F-ing House."
- Best RockClimbing.com Rant Ever

www.AndyInTheRockies.com

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Postby jfox » Wed Aug 30, 2006 8:23 am

Hey, I got ~6,000' on Middle Teton. I'll give you some of my altitude to make up for your loss.

I'm storing those extra feet in a 14er altitude bank account to withdraw on the mountains where I don't get 3,000'. I can make small loans to those who really need them. My interest rates are reasonable.

:wink:

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3000 foot rule

Postby JimR » Wed Aug 30, 2006 8:31 am

What if you start less than 3000 ft below summit, but lose (& of course regain) enough elevation to make it 3000 vertical? Does that count, or do you have to drop below (summit - 3000 ft) somewhere along the route?

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Postby cftbq » Wed Aug 30, 2006 8:50 am

Andy wrote:You you have to ascend 3,000' for each 14er you climb. If don't then then you don't get a trophy when you finish the 14ers.


I beg to differ. One need only climb 3,000 ft. to the first summit from the trailhead. After that, traverses are allowed to adjacent peaks.
I have been to the mountaintop, and I have seen the force
and the power that animates the universe. That may not
match up with your anthropomorphic or teleological idea of
what "god" is, but it's good enough for me.

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Postby Andy » Wed Aug 30, 2006 9:44 am

cftbq wrote:
Andy wrote:You you have to ascend 3,000' for each 14er you climb. If don't then then you don't get a trophy when you finish the 14ers.


I beg to differ. One need only climb 3,000 ft. to the first summit from the trailhead. After that, traverses are allowed to adjacent peaks.

Hmmmm. That's not my understanding. We'll have to consult the official "rule book." Who has a copy?
"What a day, eh, Milhouse? The sun is out, birds are singing,
bees are trying to have sex with them - as is my understanding..."

- Bart Simpson

"You are not Steve F-ing House."
- Best RockClimbing.com Rant Ever

www.AndyInTheRockies.com

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Postby Andy » Wed Aug 30, 2006 9:50 am

cftbq wrote:
Andy wrote:You you have to ascend 3,000' for each 14er you climb. If don't then then you don't get a trophy when you finish the 14ers.


I beg to differ. One need only climb 3,000 ft. to the first summit from the trailhead. After that, traverses are allowed to adjacent peaks.


Bill wrote:The 3,000-foot "rule" is just a guideline that some use to define when a peak has been climbed. It's a goal. If you hike to a 14er summit without gaining 3,000', you still hiked the peak. If you decide to adopt this goal, that's fine. If not, no worries - you are like most. Climbing these peaks with or without gaining 3k on every peak is a big accomplishment. The 3k thing is no different than having a goal to climb 20 peaks a year, or 100,000' of gain, or climbing at least once a week. It's just something to shoot for.

If you don't care about this "rule", you will have a much easier time climbing many of the 14ers. For example, if you climb Grays and then hike over and summit Torreys, you have gained about 3,600 feet and bagged both peaks. If you are intent on gaining 3,000 feet on every peak, Grays and Torreys becomes a completely different task. Hike to the Grays summit, return to the Stevens Gulch trailhead and then start back up to climb Torreys. This requires 6,000 feet of gain instead of 3,400 feet - and another 8 miles of hiking. Sticking to the 3,000-foot guideline can produce a ton of additional driving and climbing.

Uh oh... busted!!!!!! :shock: You're gonna have to go back to your list and make some big changes buddy! :( Otherwise you can kiss your trophy, prize money, and endorsements goodbye! :lol:
"What a day, eh, Milhouse? The sun is out, birds are singing,
bees are trying to have sex with them - as is my understanding..."

- Bart Simpson

"You are not Steve F-ing House."
- Best RockClimbing.com Rant Ever

www.AndyInTheRockies.com

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