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Ski Maintenance for Beer

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Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby COBuckeye » Mon Oct 31, 2011 3:35 pm

I am fairly new to skiing (4 seasons), but always take my skis to a shop for maintenance. I hate paying for a job that I know I could do myself with a little instruction and the right tools. So...I would gladly buy someone a case of their favorite brew for a few hours of instruction regarding waxing, base repair, tuning, etc.

Thanks,
Jason
"...cause I got changed by what I've been shown, more glory than the world has known, keeps me ramblin' on..." - Josh Garrels (Farther Along)

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Re: Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby BenfromtheEast » Mon Oct 31, 2011 4:36 pm

Jason,
I'll PM you for details.

Anyone else,
I like beer and know how to tune skis. 8) Feel free to ask!

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Re: Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby dehrlich101 » Mon Oct 31, 2011 4:39 pm

REI puts on a free class for Ski Waxing Basics, here is a link to the Englewood Store class on 11/10 6:30 - 8:00 pm. All you have to do is sign up!

http://www.rei.com/event/229/session/38690
I am glad I shall never be young without wild country to be young in - Aldo Leopold

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Re: Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby BenfromtheEast » Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:03 pm

dehrlich101 wrote:REI puts on a free class for Ski Waxing Basics, here is a link to the Englewood Store class on 11/10 6:30 - 8:00 pm. All you have to do is sign up!

http://www.rei.com/event/229/session/38690


Well that's no good for my new job. :?

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Re: Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby dehrlich101 » Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:31 pm

BenfromtheEast wrote:
dehrlich101 wrote:REI puts on a free class for Ski Waxing Basics, here is a link to the Englewood Store class on 11/10 6:30 - 8:00 pm. All you have to do is sign up!

http://www.rei.com/event/229/session/38690


Well that's no good for my new job. :?


On the other hand.. you will most likely get a better education from a one on one lesson, with our good buddy BenfromtheEast.
I am glad I shall never be young without wild country to be young in - Aldo Leopold

Support Colorado Search and Rescue - CORSAR Card

LOJ

Re: Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby lordhelmut » Mon Oct 31, 2011 10:27 pm

BenfromtheEast wrote:Jason,
I'll PM you for details.

Anyone else,
I like beer and know how to tune skis. 8) Feel free to ask!


I will be calling upon your services in the near future. 2 questions. How is your edging ability and where do you live?

REI and ski tuning are two entities that don't go well together.

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Re: Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby tommyboy360 » Mon Oct 31, 2011 11:36 pm

1) Start with and learn to wax and do it regularly. Buy the basics, read up and then experiment. Take mental notes on what worked for you and what didn't. What type of wax, how much, how often... learning how much to scrape and buff... blending different types of wax... it all takes experience. Go to home depot and get a pair of work horses to setup a basic station to wax/tune your gear at home.

2) Get a couple of basic stones to deburr your edges and keep them sharp. A good brush to open up the base. Lots of options for a hot iron. Plastic scrapers are cheap too. No need to buy an expensive BURTON or other mersh scraper. It's just a piece of plastic and it's more about how you use it. Be careful with steel brushes, metal scrapers and other sharpening devices as you could do more damage than good. Start with some simple basics and build from there. Best to pay for a pro tune and then learn to maintain to it. A pack of beer and one sitting is not going to teach you everything. It's the art of speed and the ones that are good at it are worth the price.

3) Be careful with base repair, especially if your damage is deep or along the edges. It's worth the price to have a professional lab do the work. Get to know the local tune guys at the place you ski. They all work on trade. Learning to p-tex and do quick and easy repairs is a good skill but will take time and experience as every dinger is a different animal.

4) A professional stone grind is all that and a bag of chips. You can buy tons of crap, waste a lot time and never get that kind of structure put back into your base like a good stone grind. Worth every penny. Wax and tune at home after that.

5) Baby your gear. No clamp style roof racks. Inside the car, stored at the resort or use a roof top box. Put a cheap light weight bag over it if you're going to put it on a typical clamp down rack or you're wasting your money on a tune. Store your gear at home on the proper racks or work horses.

6) Skip experimenting with local colorado wax and use SAUCER WAX. I live by it.
“It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

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Re: Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby COBuckeye » Tue Nov 01, 2011 7:24 am

Tommyboy,
Thanks for the info. I guess I thought that the maintenance was a straightforward DYI job, but I may have to be careful how much I try on my own. Then again, my gear is really old and better to experiment on than newer/more expensive stuff.

Ben,
Thanks for the offer, PM replied to.

Brian,
I fully agree with your REI statement (although I am sure they have a few good techs). Plus I thought that offering beer for education would be a good way to meet a few more skiers, and I seem to always get smarter when I drink...
"...cause I got changed by what I've been shown, more glory than the world has known, keeps me ramblin' on..." - Josh Garrels (Farther Along)

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Re: Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby Presto » Tue Nov 01, 2011 9:49 am

... and I seem to always get smarter when I drink...


:-" Gosh, that makes me think of a wonderfully poetic song by Lonesome Bob ... :wink:

http://www.reverbnation.com/play_now/song_3397218
As if none of us have ever come back with a cool, quasi-epic story instead of being victim to tragic rockfall, a fatal stumble, a heart attack, an embolism, a lightning strike, a bear attack, collapsing cornice, some psycho with an axe, a falling tree, carbon monoxide, even falling asleep at the wheel getting to a mountain. If you can't accept the fact that sometimes "s**t happens", then you live with the illusion that your epic genius and profound wilderness intelligence has put you in total and complete control of yourself, your partners, and the mountain. How mystified you'll be when "s**t happens" to you! - FM

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Re: Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby fleetmack » Tue Nov 01, 2011 10:03 am

5) Baby your gear. No clamp style roof racks.


I've never heard this before. Not arguing it at all, but don't understand. Can you explain what this does?
"Cynicism and ill-humored opinion have built a stronghold called the message board. Sweet mother of God, see a f***ing shrink, people."
--Corey Taylor

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Re: Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby tommyboy360 » Tue Nov 01, 2011 11:01 am

COBuckeye wrote:Thanks for the info. I guess I thought that the maintenance was a straightforward DYI job, but I may have to be careful how much I try on my own. Then again, my gear is really old and better to experiment on than newer/more expensive stuff.
A lot of the maintenance stuff is straightforward DYI and it will make a huge difference in your performance but it will take time to get really good at it. Watch youtube, search for many of the great articles and take up the offer you got for tuning tips for beer. The complete tune at home is tough for major base repair, stone grinds, etc. A stone grind is a once year thing but it's a great way to start the season. But learning basic tuning/maintenance skills on some old gear is a great idea since you can easily damage your equipment with a hot iron and metal/steel tools.


fleetmack wrote:I've never heard this before. Not arguing it at all, but don't understand. Can you explain what this does?
If you spend the time polishing and getting that base speedy fast, it will pain you to see your base, edges, bindings exposed to a regular high powered speed rinse of highway grime, dirt, oil, mag chloride, etc... A roof top box is perfect. If not, buy a cheap $20 unpadded plastic cover/bag. Speed/glide is your friend... the outdoor highway finishing rinse will work against the time/money you invested in a tune before you even take run #1.
“It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

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Re: Ski Maintenance for Beer

Postby nkan02 » Tue Nov 01, 2011 11:13 am

COBuckeye wrote:Brian,
I fully agree with your REI statement (although I am sure they have a few good techs). Plus I thought that offering beer for education would be a good way to meet a few more skiers, and I seem to always get smarter when I drink...

Well, I know a couple of people who are thinking of getting into AT this year. Maybe we could put a group together to go up Sherman sometime in November?
It has frequently been noticed that all mountains appear doomed to pass through the three stages: An inaccessible peak - The most difficult ascent in the Alps - An easy day for a lady. Albert Frederick Mummery, My Climbs in the Alps and Caucasus

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