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Skinning technique

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Skinning technique

Postby Ski4Fun » Sun Dec 16, 2007 1:52 pm

I was trying out my new ATS skins today on some fresh snow here in the Midwest. I didn't have any problems getting the skins set up and it was relatively easy to take them off after my short tour today. My only problem was with the lack of glide that I would get. I was expecting to have some glide but there really wasn't any at all. I'm not sure if it's my inexperience on them or if that's just the way they are supposed to work? I figured someone on here might be able to provide some insight on my problem.
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Re: Skinning technique

Postby Kojones » Sun Dec 16, 2007 2:33 pm

To start - my own experience is with telemark skis. I have been on trips with people using AT equipment. While the step movement is slightly different, essentially the advise will be the same.

Try to keep the skis on the top of the snow and glide them during each step. This is easier with telemark skis than AT from what I saw and what I have heard from my fellow AT friends. It will prevent the snow from freezing to the skins and will allow better glide. Also, follow through with your step and try to glide a little further than your step. This will help prevent the snow from making that bond with the skins. Unlike with climbing wax which you rely on that bond being made, the skins will catch on the snow even with the follow-through step.

Enjoy!
Kojones
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Re: Skinning technique

Postby thebeave7 » Sun Dec 16, 2007 2:37 pm

Well, the amount of glide depends on the type of snow. Wet and sticky snow tends to greatly reduce glide. Another thing that helps the glide is skin wax. I always rub some on my skins if I anticipate a little bit sticky snow. Costs around $10 and can usually be found at any mountaineering store that sells AT gear, or online.
Eric
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Re: Skinning technique

Postby jdsiro » Sun Dec 16, 2007 3:38 pm

I was hoping this was a thread on skinning animals... I'm sorely disappointed. :(
"Even youths shall faint and be weary, and young men shall fall exhausted; but they who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint." ~Isaiah 40:30-31 (ESV)

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Re: Skinning technique

Postby Ski4Fun » Sun Dec 16, 2007 3:58 pm

thebeave7 wrote:Well, the amount of glide depends on the type of snow. Wet and sticky snow tends to greatly reduce glide. Another thing that helps the glide is skin wax. I always rub some on my skins if I anticipate a little bit sticky snow. Costs around $10 and can usually be found at any mountaineering store that sells AT gear, or online.
Eric

I didn't have a problem with snow building up on the skins. It was pretty dry for what we usually get here in IL. I'll have to try some skin wax and see if that helps. I was hoping to get more glide with the skins, especially on the downhills and flats.
Ski now, work later.
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Re: Skinning technique

Postby doumall » Sun Dec 16, 2007 5:41 pm

Definitely snow dependent. Dry cold snow can be really grippy.

A tip to energy efficient skinning: Try to focus on keeping your core (head body and hips) moving at a steady consistent pace while your arms and legs do what they need to do to realize this. Slow skinners always seem to stop their core with each step which requires movement without the aid of momentum. Slow skinners also seem to pick nearly the entire ski off the ground with each step. Try to focus on keeping the length of the ski base in contact with the snow throughout a step cycle. You can do this with AT.

Sometimes its not feasible to actually glide with each step (uphill or grippy snow) in which case it takes a some serious practice to figure out how to maintain a steady core movement.

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