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Sherman, Quandrey or something else in the Fairplay area?

FAQ and threads for those just starting to hike the Colorado 14ers.
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Sherman, Quandrey or something else in the Fairplay area?

Postby Warthog » Thu Jun 07, 2007 1:50 pm

I'll be staying maybe 20 miles east of Fairplay in late June. I'm trying to determine the best peak for a group of 9 guys that vary from never having climbed a peak to having climbed 2 or 3 peaks. All of us will be flatlanders but have been getting in shape over the spring-or have claimed to be!

From what I can tell two good ones that are fairly close would be Sherman and Quandary. I was curious if one stood out to folks as a better climb and why that peak would seem better. Heck for all I know maybe the ideal close peak is a different one in which case please toss that idea out! I'm excited about the idea of climbing a peak but not sure which one to set my mind to.

Thanks for your help

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Postby Jim Davies » Thu Jun 07, 2007 2:06 pm

Sherman is easier, and has interesting mine ruins. Quandary is nice also, so you can't go too wrong with this choice. Mind you, you might still be dealing with snow at that time...
Some people are afraid of heights. Not me, I'm afraid of widths. -- Steven Wright

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Postby Piker » Thu Jun 07, 2007 2:27 pm

Both are easy climbs, but Quandary is closer to the Breckenridge Brewery. :D
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Postby Warthog » Thu Jun 07, 2007 3:04 pm

"Both are easy climbs, but Quandary is closer to the Breckenridge Brewery"

Man you sound like part of my group... Would either of these be hikes that would demand a pair of hiking boots? I see that listed as required gear, but I'm not sure at what sort of level the "required" kicks in and stops being a suggestion. Did that make sense?

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Postby Jim Davies » Thu Jun 07, 2007 3:33 pm

You could do either one in tennis shoes, except that your feet might get wet from the snow (depending the the amount of melting between now and your hike). Wear thick non-cotton socks if you can, though.
Some people are afraid of heights. Not me, I'm afraid of widths. -- Steven Wright

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Postby telekelley » Thu Jun 07, 2007 3:40 pm

You could certainly do it in running shoes, but your feet would probably pay for it. The advantage of hiking boots is the firm support for your arches and ankles (if a full boot). But I would go with a hiking shoe over tennis shoes. There are a lot of rocks above 13,000 and your feet will pay the price without a firm sole. Just something to think about.
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