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FAQ and threads for those just starting to hike the Colorado 14ers.
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Postby Inky6900 » Thu May 31, 2007 3:58 pm

The wildlife issue is definitely another concern and I agree with people's comments on this. Dog's shouldn't be running rampant all over the mountain terrorizing nature. If your dog doesn't listen to you to leave the wildlife alone you'll be angering a lot of people...and disrespecting nature too. A bad dog is not made good by placing a leash on him either. Disobedient dogs make mountain experiences bad all around even for those of us that love seeing dogs up there.

About 2 summers ago I climbed San Luis Peak from the continental divide side (can't remember the trailhead). Anyway a guy climbed from the opposite side (Stewart Creek) the same day. When we met on the top his dog wanted to bite me and my dog. Because the owner was so tired he did little to pull his dog back. I was quite upset. I was polite but it did ruin the summit experience and his dog simply didn't deserve to be up there.
With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.

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Postby cheeseburglar » Thu May 31, 2007 4:41 pm

Maybe I need to read the posts on the dog forum.
What was the verdict on chasing marmots?
Before we killed the wolves off, I imagine they spent a good part of the day playing chase with marmots. If my dog helps the marmots relive those good old days, is that harrassing wildlife?
In defense of my dog, she has been within 25 yards of mountain goats and stood behind me, scared to death.
She is also terribly frightened of cows even though she is a supposed to be a cattle dog.

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Postby Inky6900 » Thu May 31, 2007 4:53 pm

No offense to you personally. I just think dogs shouldn't chase wildlife. But then I don't leash my dog and people have got mad about that. So in the end we're all just lucky to be up there and have fun experiences.
With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.

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Postby cheeseburglar » Thu May 31, 2007 4:59 pm

None taken.
I just try not to offend all the people all the time.

I also find it annoying when other peoples dogs harrass my dog.

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Postby Inky6900 » Thu May 31, 2007 5:04 pm

Cool. Last thing I want to do is make enemies here. Good luck with your climbs this year!!! Good luck to your dog too!!!
With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.

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Postby tomcat67 » Thu May 31, 2007 6:50 pm

our 5 yr old weimeraner lab mix climbs anything we can X10. She will leap up short 4th class moves with ease. I even had her chase me up to the 3rd bolt on a slab climb near Seattle last year. I think most working class dogs or retreivers should fair pretty well on most climbs(long hikes). The smaller breeds, as said before, it's a dog to dog basis. I think most dogs would rather not be left at home.

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Postby cheeseburglar » Thu May 31, 2007 8:19 pm

Depending on the dog, leaving it at home could be abuse.

A class 4 climb for a lot of dogs is easy, the downclimb can be trickier!
Out bouldering, my dog has scampered up class 5 pitches as high as 15 feet, but not down.
I've found that usually getting up is the hard part and getting down is the dangerous part.

Anyone know of climbing companies that manufacture slings for dogs to belay them on the way down?

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Postby Inky6900 » Fri Jun 01, 2007 8:42 am

There are some companies that do make hoisting harnesses or slings for dogs but they are typically pretty expensive. Most being several hundred dollars. If you search google you'll find companies that sell them for SAR dogs or the canines associated with SWAT teams. Many are custom made based on your dog's measurements.

The bigger problem in hoisting or lowering your dog is how dangerous that is. I once experimented with a rope on Crestone Peak with my dog and found out it was disaster for both of us. It hindered his natural movements by me holding him back and it hindered my movement and balance with him tugging and squirming. After almost getting pulled off the mountain I unhooked him and let him take care of himself. For me it was too scary and unsafe.

Maybe a smaller dog would be easier and safer to hoist or lower though, so that could be considered too.
With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.

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It's on...

Postby vikingquest7 » Fri Jun 01, 2007 11:08 am

Thank you for all the replies. Both of my dogs have been on tons of hikes just not 14ers. They're both young, so they do get excited when they see other dogs, but they get over it quick, they're just curious. With repetition I'm sure it won't be a big deal being in these situations with other dogs, people, and wildlife. They're already pretty well behaved. At any rate, judging by all comments made, they'll be coming with for Shavano and Tab this weekend. Thank you again for all the information, good luck with the climbs this year and hopefully I'll run into some of you out there.

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