Forum
Buying gear? Please use these links to help 14ers.com:

More info...

Other ways to help...

When do you use what gear?

FAQ and threads for those just starting to hike the Colorado 14ers.
Posts: 22
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 5:31 am
Location: broomfield

Postby SOD » Thu Jun 07, 2007 6:20 am

Kojones summed it all up pretty good.

Just keep in mind that even in snowshoes, you will still sink into the snow if you are traveling where there is no path and the snow is soft. It's not as bad as postholing, but it can still get very tiring.

Seems like most people think that snowshoes will keep them on top of the snow and that is not always the case. I can remember a couple of winters back, I was attempting to climb Mummy Mt. in RMNP.
I got off the trail, and I found myself sinking up to my waist while wearing my snowshoes. Talk about breaking a sweat. I've never had such a hard workout.
So you run and you run to catch up with the sun but it's sinking
Racing around to come up behind you again.
The sun is the same in a relative way but you're older,
Shorter of breath and one day closer to death.

User avatar
Posts: 704
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2005 8:24 pm
Location: Brighton, CO

Re: When do you use what gear?

Postby Layne Bracy » Thu Jun 07, 2007 8:48 am

RockFarmer wrote:...Thus I would think that I should grab the snow shoes before I grabbed the ax....


I'd put this the other way. I will almost always have an axe when there is significant snow from fall to spring. Uses include self-arrest, facilitating travel on a snowslope, and braking for glissading. I may leave the snowshoes in the car in fall when snow is not too deep or spring when snow is well consolidated. I also may not take snowshoes for a high windswept ridge(above Loveland Pass, Berthoud Pass, Hoosier Pass for example) where the snow may not get deep all winter long.

The consequence of not having snowshoes when needed is moving slower whereas the consequence of not having an axe(or crampons) could be immediate injury or death. It's more important to back off a route when you don't have axe/crampons when needed - I've been in places where I pushed a little without the proper gear and then felt fortunate to return safely.

User avatar
Posts: 569
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 8:53 pm
Location: Denver, CO

Postby krz2fer » Thu Jun 07, 2007 8:54 am

Kojones wrote:I see you are in CS, but I'm always willing to go to REI with someone to check out gear. I prefer the Denver Flagship store, just because selection is a bit more than the others.


I can attest to his REI meetings that he's got some great suggestions! I took the Kojones "camping tour" a few weeks back. :) Thanks again!
Chris

User avatar
Posts: 97
Joined: Mon May 21, 2007 4:33 pm
Location: Colo Springs

Postby RockParkour » Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:19 am

I'll be attending the following course at the Colorado Springs REI.

See you there?!


Colorado Springs Clinics and Events

How to Climb a 14er
6/14/2007 7:00 PM

You'll learn about food, equipment, training, weather, and safety considerations. A colorado Fourteeners Initiative (CFI) representative may be available for additional information.
Location: 1376 E Woodmen Road
Contact: Customer Service, 260-1455
Cost: Free
Registration Required? No.

User avatar
Posts: 567
Joined: Thu Apr 20, 2006 1:03 pm
Location: Littleton, CO

Postby Spam » Thu Jun 07, 2007 11:05 am

On Freedom of the Hills, look on Amazon. You can get it used for less than 1/2 the price retail including the shipping. the book (depending on hard or soft cover) runs $40. You can get it as low as $15 on Amazon!
"Getting to the top is optional, getting down is mandatory." -- Ed Viesturs

User avatar
Posts: 600
Joined: Tue May 08, 2007 5:06 pm
Location: Galt's Gulch

Postby Ken Gross » Thu Jun 07, 2007 12:44 pm

SOD wrote:Kojones summed it all up pretty good.

Just keep in mind that even in snowshoes, you will still sink into the snow if you are traveling where there is no path and the snow is soft. It's not as bad as postholing, but it can still get very tiring.

Seems like most people think that snowshoes will keep them on top of the snow and that is not always the case. I can remember a couple of winters back, I was attempting to climb Mummy Mt. in RMNP.
I got off the trail, and I found myself sinking up to my waist while wearing my snowshoes. Talk about breaking a sweat. I've never had such a hard workout.


Skis on the other hand provide excelant floatation in Deep unconsolidated snow, the mid winter snowpack in Colorado is far too powdery for snow shoes to work well... Why walk on tennis rackets when you can ski!! :D
Last edited by Ken Gross on Thu Jun 07, 2007 12:52 pm, edited 2 times in total.
"Democracy is 2 wolves and a lamb discussing what's for dinner. Liberty is a well armed lamb willing to contest the majority decision." Benjamin Franklin 1755

Moderator
User avatar
Posts: 4884
Joined: Mon Jul 26, 2004 9:54 am
Location: Woodland Park, Colorado

Postby CO Native » Thu Jun 07, 2007 12:48 pm

I recommend you begin using technical gear sooner than you think you need to. It's a good idea to put on the crampons and pull out the ice axe on terrain that doesn't merit their use, and then put them to use. Practicing on safe slopes will not only give you skills you need, it will also give you an idea of when you'd want to use this equipment. After getting used to using crampons you may find you just like wearing them for the extra comfort level and therefore begin wearing them on any large snowfield no matter the slope. Same goes for the axe.
Remember what your knees are for.
http://www.hikingintherockies.com

Previous

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests