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Climbing in Peru

Discussion area for peaks outside of the USA.
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Re: Climbing in Peru

Postby mtnmaneric » Thu Jan 06, 2011 4:22 pm

Both of the above statements are correct, but my advice would be to get the heck out of Lima as fast as you can! What a disgusting place, we were sick while there, the whole team was, and as soon as we got to the mountains above Huaraz - everything was bueno!

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Re: Climbing in Peru

Postby MountainHiker » Thu Jan 06, 2011 4:58 pm

Cuzco can be a base for cultural site seeing along with doing the Inca trail. The 4 day Inca trail is classic. You can finish up with a hike of Machu Picchu Mountain.

Lake Titicaca 12,500’ has some islands where native people are still hanging on to some of their traditional ways. We hiked to the top of a couple thirteeners – Pachamama 13579’ & Pachatata 13532’ on Amantani island.

Near Arequipa are Chachani & El Misti. We climbed Chanchani 19,872’ from where we were driven to and set up camp. Chachani is basically not technical but mostly loose finer than sand. We only crossed a little snow near the top.

I have been to Peru twice, in 1998 & 2010. There has been a lot of modernization. Not as many people are living as they used to. They seem interested in preserving their traditions but that’s what it is becoming. I saw a traditionally dressed woman sitting on her blanket selling souvenirs texting. Don’t put off going there for too long.
Red, Rugged, and Rotten: The Elk Range - Borneman & Lampert

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Re: Climbing in Peru

Postby Bullwinkle » Thu Jan 06, 2011 7:09 pm

brett.t.burch wrote:
bif wrote:As an aside, and hopefully not hijacking the thread, if anybody has some suggestions (what to skip or what to definitely do) for a 7 - 10 day trip in May that I'm planning in Peru, feel free to shoot me a message. There's way too much to do (high peaks, amazon jungle, lima, machu picchu, etc), so any help would be appreciated.


I used to live in, and travel extensively in Peru. To maximize enjoyment I would recommend at least 10 days RT from your front door, then focus on just one or two areas in Peru. Seasons are opposite in Peru, so you will be entering what is a cool, overcast climate along the coastal plains. Conversely, the mountains (Cordillera Negra, Cordillera Blanca, and the altiplano) are generally sunny and dry. If you can give me a little more information on the things you like to do I can help you put together an itinerary.
As a mountain more fully reveals itself to a man, so the true nature of the man will be more fully revealed

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Re: Climbing in Peru

Postby sunny1 » Fri Jan 07, 2011 7:05 pm

Agree with what other posters have said, if you only have 7-10 days, focus on one area in Peru.
I did the Inca trail in 2006.
It may seem like common sense, but just a reminder, particularly to women, stick with your group, or at least with one buddy.
Don't hike if you don't feel well that day.
One of my friends was sexually assaulted by one of our guides. We found Peru to be quite patriarchal, it is economically depressed and third world.
It is not recommended for folks to wander around Lima alone.
Please be safe.
The older you get, the better you get, unless you're a banana.

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